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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002
From a Times Staff Writer Richard Boeken, a lung cancer victim who won a record $100-million damage award against cigarette maker Philip Morris last year, died Wednesday at his home in Topanga. He was 57. The cause of death was cancer. Boeken began to smoke as a teenager more than 40 years ago, when warning labels on cigarette packages were not common practice and TV ads portrayed smokers as virile and cool.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002
From a Times Staff Writer Richard Boeken, a lung cancer victim who won a record $100-million damage award against cigarette maker Philip Morris last year, died Wednesday at his home in Topanga. He was 57. The cause of death was cancer. Boeken began to smoke as a teenager more than 40 years ago, when warning labels on cigarette packages were not common practice and TV ads portrayed smokers as virile and cool.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Re "Smoker Agrees to $100-Million Award," Aug. 22: Let me get this straight. Richard Boeken chooses to take up cigarette smoking, becomes addicted to cigarettes, subsequently develops lung cancer as a result of his decision to smoke cigarettes and now the cigarette company owes him $100 million? Whatever happened to personal responsibility? Boeken is yet another example of the pathetic nature of the irresponsibility plaguing our nation. Rod Guyton Torrance If Boeken, a smoker, can get $100 million for his addiction, which led to lung cancer, what should my family get?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001
Re "Smoker Agrees to $100-Million Award," Aug. 22: Let me get this straight. Richard Boeken chooses to take up cigarette smoking, becomes addicted to cigarettes, subsequently develops lung cancer as a result of his decision to smoke cigarettes and now the cigarette company owes him $100 million? Whatever happened to personal responsibility? Boeken is yet another example of the pathetic nature of the irresponsibility plaguing our nation. Rod Guyton Torrance If Boeken, a smoker, can get $100 million for his addiction, which led to lung cancer, what should my family get?
OPINION
June 10, 2001
Re "L.A. Jury Awards $3 Billion to Smoker," June 7: If we are a government by and for the people, why did we choose for generations to ally ourselves with the tobacco industry and profit through taxation of its products? We could have outlawed tobacco, or at least not turned a buck from it. If smokers are now to be compensated, then we the people, through our federal and state governments, should be paying our share. Maybe it would teach Americans a lesson about greed, influence peddling and politics and encourage them to elect representatives who are not tied to special industry interests.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its bid to reverse a $3-billion courtroom defeat in Los Angeles, tobacco giant Philip Morris Cos. is mining the colorful past of the plaintiff, Richard Boeken, and arguing that the judge erred in excluding evidence of his three criminal convictions. Boeken, 56, is a Marlboro smoker and lung cancer victim who last month won the largest punitive damages award for an individual smoker. The Los Angeles County Superior Court jury ordered Philip Morris to pay $5.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Boeken started smoking at the age of 13, and now is 56 and gravely ill with cancer--a sad but familiar tale. Unlike thousands of others who have suffered in silence, Boeken's story is about to be told to a jury, in the first smoking and health case ever tried in Los Angeles County. Opening arguments are expected today in Los Angeles Superior Court in Boeken's fraud and negligence suit against Philip Morris Inc.
BUSINESS
April 5, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
A California appeals court reaffirmed its decision that ordered Altria Group Inc.'s Philip Morris USA to pay $50 million to the family of a smoker who died of lung cancer. In September, the California Court of Appeal in Los Angeles reduced a trial award to $50 million from $100 million. Both sides asked the court for a rehearing. On Friday the court reiterated its decision, provided that Richard Boeken's family agreed to accept the $50-million award.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 2001
Re "L.A. Jury Awards $3 Billion to Smoker," June 7: While I sympathize with cancer victim Richard Boeken in his illness, I wonder where the concept of personal responsibility for our actions has gone. It has been known for many years that smoking is hazardous to one's health, and a person does so at his (or her) own risk. Charles G. Blakelock Jr. Oak Park I lost my darling husband in September last year to lung cancer. He had had three cancer surgeries plus radiation and chemotherapy over a 15-year period.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2001 | PHILIP MORRIS COMPANIES INC, Reuters
A Los Angeles judge may decide today whether to overturn a jury's order that tobacco company Philip Morris Cos. pay a record $3 billion to longtime smoker and cancer victim Richard Boeken. The cigarette maker claims the verdict amount is far too high relative to similar cases and that Boeken's testimony was tainted by past criminal convictions the Los Angeles County Superior Court jury was not allowed to hear about.
BUSINESS
July 29, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In its bid to reverse a $3-billion courtroom defeat in Los Angeles, tobacco giant Philip Morris Cos. is mining the colorful past of the plaintiff, Richard Boeken, and arguing that the judge erred in excluding evidence of his three criminal convictions. Boeken, 56, is a Marlboro smoker and lung cancer victim who last month won the largest punitive damages award for an individual smoker. The Los Angeles County Superior Court jury ordered Philip Morris to pay $5.
OPINION
June 10, 2001
Re "L.A. Jury Awards $3 Billion to Smoker," June 7: If we are a government by and for the people, why did we choose for generations to ally ourselves with the tobacco industry and profit through taxation of its products? We could have outlawed tobacco, or at least not turned a buck from it. If smokers are now to be compensated, then we the people, through our federal and state governments, should be paying our share. Maybe it would teach Americans a lesson about greed, influence peddling and politics and encourage them to elect representatives who are not tied to special industry interests.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2001 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Boeken started smoking at the age of 13, and now is 56 and gravely ill with cancer--a sad but familiar tale. Unlike thousands of others who have suffered in silence, Boeken's story is about to be told to a jury, in the first smoking and health case ever tried in Los Angeles County. Opening arguments are expected today in Los Angeles Superior Court in Boeken's fraud and negligence suit against Philip Morris Inc.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2003 | From Reuters
A Los Angeles jury said Wednesday that it had reached some verdicts but had deadlocked over several allegations in the case of a cancer-stricken ex-smoker who sued Philip Morris USA, claiming that the cigarette maker should take responsibility for his illness. Court officials said the panel notified Superior Court Judge Victoria Chaney of its difficulties in concluding deliberations in the case brought by Fredric Reller, who has inoperable lung cancer.
BUSINESS
August 7, 2001 | From Reuters
Tobacco company Philip Morris asked a California state judge Monday to set aside a record $3-billion judgment awarded against it to an ex-smoker dying of cancer, saying that the man should get no more than $25 million. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge Charles McCoy said he would issue a decision by the end of business Thursday, after hearing more than three hours of oral arguments on whether the judgment rendered by a jury last June should be retried, reduced or left in place.
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