Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Bona
IN THE NEWS

Richard Bona

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What would you have if you could combine, say, the virtuosic bass playing of Jaco Pastorius, the fluid vocal style of George Benson and the voice/instrument interplay of Joao Gilberto? Something pretty special, obviously. But take it a step further. Suppose all this was filtered through an African cultural consciousness.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What would you have if you could combine, say, the virtuosic bass playing of Jaco Pastorius, the fluid vocal style of George Benson and the voice/instrument interplay of Joao Gilberto? Something pretty special, obviously. But take it a step further. Suppose all this was filtered through an African cultural consciousness.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 14, 2007 | Don Heckman
The Phil Woods Quintet Alto saxophonist Woods is Charlie Parker's direct musical descendant, one of the true masters of the fiery complexities of roots bebop. Angelique Kidjo Singing with a passionate dedication to the traditions of her native Benin, Kidjo simultaneously reaches out to embrace any music that appeals to her constant creative curiosity.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 1998 | Don Heckman
* * * * JOE ZAWINUL AND THE ZAWINUL SYNDICATE "World Tour 1997" Zebra Nothing enhances a jazz artist's work more than the opportunity to work over an extended period of time with the same musicians. And nothing produces better jazz recordings than live performances by such ensembles. Here's a prime example.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1997 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz has so many implicit connections with the many ethnic musics of the world that it's surprising that--aside from the Brazilian and the Afro-Cuban connections--there haven't been more efforts at linkage. One of the few who have been trying is keyboardist Joe Zawinul. And the group he brought to Catalina Bar & Grill Tuesday night at the start of a six-day run brilliantly revealed the possibilities of coupling jazz, African music and--remarkably--contemporary music technology.
TRAVEL
August 20, 2006 | Blake Hennon
Clinton, Mont. Sept. 14-18: Adventurous gourmands are invited to consume that most unorthodox edible: ahem, prairie oysters. The Testicle Festival at Rock Creek Lodge serves up more than 2 tons of bull testicles. There's also plenty of alcohol to wash them down and help you forget what you're eating. There are also bull chip-throwing contests, live musicians and good-humored debauchery. Rock Creek Lodge, 7 Rock Creek Road. Exit 126 on Interstate 90, 22 miles east of Missoula. $15.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2002 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Popular music in France has always had more to do with blending and combining than with isolating into specific genres. From the early days, in which the boundaries between cabaret and jazz were constantly circumvented, to the present-day potpourri of world, jazz, pop and dance music streaming out of the Paris studios, there has always been a belief in universality rather than separateness.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 19, 2002 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Guitarist Pat Metheny has been a legendary road warrior. For a 15-year period in the 1970s and '80s, he spent most of his time on tour, totaling nearly 900,000 miles in his band's travel van. These days, still traveling almost incessantly, he journeys in considerably more luxurious comfort.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2007 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The magic arrived unannounced, unexpected and late Wednesday evening at the Hollywood Bowl. It came in the figure of pianist Herbie Hancock, casually strolling on stage for the closing number in a program devoted to jazz guitar, transforming it into a highlight of the summer jazz season. That's not to say that the concert -- which featured guitarists Lionel Loueke, John Scofield and Lee Ritenour -- was lacking in spirit, swing or imagination.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
USC's L.A. Jazz 2001 came to an unsettling close at Bovard Auditorium on Friday night with a performance titled "Cannonball Adderley Suite."
NEWS
May 8, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Violinist Regina Carter has been receiving a considerable promotional push lately for her encounter with Paganini's legendary Guarneri violin "the Cannon." Her performances with the remarkable instrument have tended to emphasize its unprecedented use by an African American female playing jazz, rather than the quality of the music itself.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|