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Richard Boren

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989
On March 1, 1988, I was kidnaped by the Contra rebels in Nicaragua (while working with Witness for Peace) and held captive for eight terrifying days. My name was added to a list of over 6,000 civilians who have been kidnaped by the Contras. Thousands more have been killed in Contra attacks. Now it appears that the U.S.-financed Contra war may finally end. On Feb. 14, the five Central American presidents signed an agreement that calls for the Contra bases in Honduras to be dismantled and the Contras to be repatriated to Nicaragua or sent to third countries.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1989
On March 1, 1988, I was kidnaped by the Contra rebels in Nicaragua (while working with Witness for Peace) and held captive for eight terrifying days. My name was added to a list of over 6,000 civilians who have been kidnaped by the Contras. Thousands more have been killed in Contra attacks. Now it appears that the U.S.-financed Contra war may finally end. On Feb. 14, the five Central American presidents signed an agreement that calls for the Contra bases in Honduras to be dismantled and the Contras to be repatriated to Nicaragua or sent to third countries.
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NEWS
March 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Contras attacked a village in northern Nicaragua and seized 13 people, including an American volunteer for the Witness for Peace organization, group officials said Friday. Edward Griffin, local director of the U.S.-based Witness for Peace, said Richard Boren of Elkin, N.C., was abducted during the guerrilla attack Tuesday in the mountain village of Mancotal, about 75 miles north of Managua in an area where rebels operate regularly.
NEWS
March 5, 1988 | Associated Press
Contras attacked a village in northern Nicaragua and seized 13 people, including an American volunteer for the Witness for Peace organization, group officials said Friday. Edward Griffin, local director of the U.S.-based Witness for Peace, said Richard Boren of Elkin, N.C., was abducted during the guerrilla attack Tuesday in the mountain village of Mancotal, about 75 miles north of Managua in an area where rebels operate regularly.
NEWS
March 10, 1988 | Associated Press
Contra rebels have released an American volunteer worker for Witness for Peace after holding him for 10 days in northern Nicaragua, a spokesman for the organization said today. Dennis Marker, Washington director for the group, said Richard Boren, 30, was released to other Witness for Peace volunteers Wednesday evening near the remote town of Quilali. Witness for Peace opposes Contra military aid and documents human rights abuses in Nicaragua.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
The Border Patrol said Thursday that it picked up nearly 600,000 illegal immigrants coming into Arizona in the last year, a drastic increase that is due in large part to an aggressive enforcement effort launched in March. The increased enforcement involves helicopters, ground sensors, two unmanned surveillance aircraft and dozens more border agents in Arizona -- the busiest illegal entry point on the U.S.-Mexico border.
NEWS
March 11, 1988 | United Press International
A human rights organization said Thursday that U.S.-backed Contras have released one of its American members who had been kidnaped and held for nine days. Spokesmen for Witness for Peace announced in Managua and Washington that Richard Boren, 30, of Elkin, N.C., was released unharmed Wednesday night in the village of Quilali, 145 miles north of the capital.
NEWS
March 4, 1988 | Associated Press
Contra rebels kidnaped 13 people in northern Nicaragua, including an American volunteer for the Witness for Peace organization, its local director said today. Edward Griffin, the local director for the organization, identified the kidnaped American as Richard Boren, 29, of Elkin, N.C. Organization officials said Boren was a Witness for Peace volunteer in the Jinotega province of Nicaragua and had been documenting Contra activities, including human rights abuses.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 23, 1985 | DENNIS HUNT, Times Staff Writer
With a few exceptions--the Jane Fonda workout programs for instance--video store owners aren't too keen on exercise cassettes. Most of them are reluctant to stock them because their space is so limited and they would rather use the space for movies. So when it comes to exercise cassettes, retailers, looking for sales pegs, are inclined to stock those with celebrity status. So a $39.
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