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Richard Boucher

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NEWS
May 15, 1989 | From Times wire services
The State Department today denounced as "outlandish" a Soviet threat to consider retaining some nuclear missiles outlawed in a 1987 treaty if NATO proceeded with a program to upgrade short-range weapons. A department spokesman, Richard Boucher, also dismissed reports that the United States was working out a compromise with West Germany, which opposes the modernization program for the 88 Lance launchers and their 700 or so missiles. "I don't see any sort of compromise shaping up, but we are certainly continuing discussions," the U.S. official said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. embassies in Bulgaria and Romania were closed to the public Thursday after they received information about possible terrorist attacks, the State Department announced. "There is information about possible threats against these embassies that made them . . . close for public operations while they reviewed the status of their security posture," department spokesman Richard Boucher said. He would not say when they would reopen. Most recent embassy closures have lasted a day or two.
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NEWS
April 21, 1989
The United States said Panama has sharply curbed visits by Americans in order to obstruct monitoring of the May 7 presidential election. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said the move by the regime of Gen. Manuel A. Noriega "is an effort to insulate Panama's electoral process from any credible degree of public scrutiny." The department also said that Panama is printing false voter lists, changing data in voting registries, providing insufficient ballots for opposition candidates and using military personnel to campaign illegally.
NEWS
July 12, 1989
The State Department accused Nicaragua's Sandinista government of harassing reporters, opposition figures and election observers, and it called for a halt to such activity so that balloting set for next February can be credible. Department spokesman Richard Boucher said Washington is "very concerned about the way things are going in Nicaragua. Sandinista harassment . . . whether done through brute force or through the use of transparent legalisms, must cease."
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The United States today criticized as offensive and undemocratic a system requiring Palestinians in a West Bank settlement to wear identification badges. The State Department used strong language in response to reports that the Israeli settlement of Ariel has ordered Arab workers to wear white identification badges bearing the words "foreign worker" in Hebrew. "We would find this practice offensive and in our view . . . incompatible with democratic values," State Department spokesman Richard Boucher told a news briefing.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
The just-departed spokesman at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz called Bolivians "trolls . . . short and dark and strange" in a fictional story, prompting a State Department review. The story by Mark Jacobs, called "Stone Cowboy on the High Plains," was published in the June editions of the Atlantic. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher, asked about the story Monday, said he was unaware of it but added, "I can assure you we'll go out and buy a copy of the Atlantic . . . " The hero of Jacobs' fictional story, Roger, is a character who has spent time in a Bolivian jail and is eager to leave the country.
NEWS
August 31, 2001 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The U.S. embassies in Bulgaria and Romania were closed to the public Thursday after they received information about possible terrorist attacks, the State Department announced. "There is information about possible threats against these embassies that made them . . . close for public operations while they reviewed the status of their security posture," department spokesman Richard Boucher said. He would not say when they would reopen. Most recent embassy closures have lasted a day or two.
OPINION
February 29, 2004
How laughable that State Department spokesman Richard Boucher would criticize Israel for seizing terrorist funds held in Palestinian banks without first coordinating the raids with Palestinian authorities (Feb. 26). Does our State Department also expect the FBI to give Osama bin Laden a call before seizing Al Qaeda bank accounts? Lorin M. Fife Valley Village
WORLD
August 20, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. State Department credited Syria with "limited progress" in restraining terrorists from crossing the border with Iraq and in expelling some extremists. But President Bashar Assad's government has not gone far enough, particularly in closing offices of extremist groups in Damascus, department spokesman Richard Boucher said. The State Department lists Syria as a sponsor of terrorism.
WORLD
January 31, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.S. Embassy in Berlin closed its consular section after city police tightened security because of a warning of a possible terrorist attack against American and Israeli targets, a spokeswoman said. In Washington, State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said the U.S. Defense Liaison Office in Bonn had also been closed to the public. Police said they had "general information about a concrete attack" from unidentified foreign intelligence services.
NEWS
June 29, 1989 | From Associated Press
The just-departed spokesman at the U.S. Embassy in La Paz called Bolivians "trolls . . . short and dark and strange" in a fictional story, prompting a State Department review. The story by Mark Jacobs, called "Stone Cowboy on the High Plains," was published in the June editions of the Atlantic. State Department spokesman Richard Boucher, asked about the story Monday, said he was unaware of it but added, "I can assure you we'll go out and buy a copy of the Atlantic . . . " The hero of Jacobs' fictional story, Roger, is a character who has spent time in a Bolivian jail and is eager to leave the country.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | From Times wire services
The United States today criticized as offensive and undemocratic a system requiring Palestinians in a West Bank settlement to wear identification badges. The State Department used strong language in response to reports that the Israeli settlement of Ariel has ordered Arab workers to wear white identification badges bearing the words "foreign worker" in Hebrew. "We would find this practice offensive and in our view . . . incompatible with democratic values," State Department spokesman Richard Boucher told a news briefing.
NEWS
May 15, 1989 | From Times wire services
The State Department today denounced as "outlandish" a Soviet threat to consider retaining some nuclear missiles outlawed in a 1987 treaty if NATO proceeded with a program to upgrade short-range weapons. A department spokesman, Richard Boucher, also dismissed reports that the United States was working out a compromise with West Germany, which opposes the modernization program for the 88 Lance launchers and their 700 or so missiles. "I don't see any sort of compromise shaping up, but we are certainly continuing discussions," the U.S. official said.
WORLD
October 1, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
The State Department is notifying Congress that it plans no immediate reductions in loan guarantees for Israel, despite settlement construction on the West Bank, spokesman Richard Boucher said. Boucher said reductions were likely at some point. He also did not rule out reductions because of Israel's construction of a security fence. The administration is opposed to the ongoing construction, at least where it interferes with Palestinians' lives.
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