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Richard Brecher

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May 20, 1991 | George White, Times staff writer. President Bush last week said he is leaning toward seeking one-year renewal of China's most-favored-nation status, which would keep tariffs on Chinese products as low as those for most other U.S. trade partners. and The United States has a mounting trade deficit with China--the third largest after Japan and Taiwan. Contending that the trade imbalance is the result of unfair Chinese trade practices--while also citing human rights problems in China--some members of Congress plan to seek votes for legislation that would eliminate China's MFN status. Times staff writer George White sought the views of two analysts on the economic ramifications of the controversy
Richard Brecher, director of business advisory services for the U.S.-China Business Council, a Washington-based group representing American firms with financial interests in China: If the MFN is not extended, the (American) business community would be damaged in a myriad of ways. If you're an exporter and you're selling to China, it's most likely that China would retaliate against U.S. products.
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BUSINESS
May 20, 1991 | George White, Times staff writer. President Bush last week said he is leaning toward seeking one-year renewal of China's most-favored-nation status, which would keep tariffs on Chinese products as low as those for most other U.S. trade partners. and The United States has a mounting trade deficit with China--the third largest after Japan and Taiwan. Contending that the trade imbalance is the result of unfair Chinese trade practices--while also citing human rights problems in China--some members of Congress plan to seek votes for legislation that would eliminate China's MFN status. Times staff writer George White sought the views of two analysts on the economic ramifications of the controversy
Richard Brecher, director of business advisory services for the U.S.-China Business Council, a Washington-based group representing American firms with financial interests in China: If the MFN is not extended, the (American) business community would be damaged in a myriad of ways. If you're an exporter and you're selling to China, it's most likely that China would retaliate against U.S. products.
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BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
James Spear, his wife Liang and their two children took off from Ontario International Airport at 9 a.m. Monday, bound for Beijing. Spear was returning to his job as manager of an international subsidiary of Unison Group, a San Bruno, Calif., company that advises foreign firms about doing business in China. "He felt the Japanese hadn't pulled out many of their businessmen," said his father, James Spear Sr. "He felt for the long term he should be there." The decision has his parents, who live in Covina, worried.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1989 | NANCY YOSHIHARA and GREGORY CROUCH, Times Staff Writers
James Spear, his wife Liang and their two children took off from Ontario International Airport at 9 a.m. Monday, bound for Beijing. Spear was returning to his job as manager of an international subsidiary of Unison Group, a San Bruno, Calif., company that advises foreign firms about doing business in China. "He felt the Japanese hadn't pulled out many of their businessmen," said his father, James Spear Sr. "He felt for the long term he should be there." The decision has his parents, who live in Covina, worried.
NEWS
June 5, 1989 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., Times Staff Writer
Just days after expressing confidence that conditions for U.S. companies in China would not worsen as a result of unrest there, some observers predicted Sunday--after a weekend of violence--that American firms could find their Chinese operations impaired for a year or more. "I don't think any of us expect a quick end to the hostilities," said Eric T. Kalkhurst, a business consultant in neighboring Hong Kong whose clients include small and medium-size American and European investment groups.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1995 | From Bloomberg Business News
A U.S.-China diplomatic feud may have spilled over into the efforts of U.S auto makers to build cars in China, with German auto maker Mercedes-Benz emerging instead as the front-runner for the proposed $1-billion joint venture. A Hong Kong newspaper reported Thursday that China has selected the European auto maker in retaliation for the recent U.S. visit of Taiwanese President Lee Teng-hui. Richard Brecher, director of business services at the U.S.
BUSINESS
May 26, 1989 | BILL SING, Times Staff Writer
Recent unrest in China has disrupted some Chinese operations of major California-based companies, as firms report slowdowns in Beijing and Shanghai but few problems anywhere else in that nation or in neighboring Hong Kong. A few California firms surveyed this week reported that their Beijing offices had been temporarily shut down because of traffic jams or other problems. Some firms also have suffered slowdowns in sales in Beijing and Shanghai or in worker productivity, as employees take breaks to discuss or participate in the political upheaval.
BUSINESS
May 27, 1994 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
California companies, selling everything from $10 Fred Flintstone dolls to $100-million jetliners, avoided a major setback Thursday as President Clinton renewed preferential trade status for China. "It's very good news," said Robert Solomon, chairman of Dakin Inc., a Woodland Hills-based marketer of the Flintstone dolls and other toys, half of which are made in China. "I only see the potential there becoming greater." Mark Schlansky, manager of commercial aircraft at Douglas Aircraft Co.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1993 | DONNA K. H. WALTERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
U.S. companies doing business in China say they won't be scared away from the world's fastest-growing and largest future marketplace, despite conditions imposed for the renewal next year of Beijing's "most favored nation" trading status. They also--for the most part--reject suggestions by U.S. officials and human rights groups that businesses should be actively lobbying the Chinese government for improvements in its human rights record.
NEWS
November 1, 1997 | NORMAN KEMPSTER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When Chinese President Jiang Zemin rang the bell to open trading at the New York Stock Exchange on Friday morning, there was a brief smattering of boos from the trading floor--quickly drowned out by a much larger wave of applause. That may well describe the larger message Jiang has heard so far on his weeklong journey across America: a few defiant notes of protest, but many more professions of praise and cooperation.
BUSINESS
December 1, 1990 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seventeen months after the Chinese government put a bloody halt to pro-democracy demonstrations at Tian An Men Square, chilling that country's business climate, U.S. companies are ending their unofficial moratorium on new investment in China. U.S. firms in the first six months of 1990 struck joint venture deals at a pace roughly half that before the crackdown, according to Chinese government figures--a trend confirmed independently by Americans familiar with U.S.-China trade.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1994 | KARL SCHOENBERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Not many people were thinking economics on June 3, 1989, the day Chinese troops mounted their brutal assault on peaceful pro-democracy demonstrators in Tian An Men Square. But five years later, business and trade are the watchwords for the anniversary of an event that horrified the world. China's economy is going gangbusters now, expanding 13% a year and emerging as a major engine for global trade. The Tian An Men blood bath is fading in memory, and persistent human rights abuses don't seem to rouse the public or spook the American business community anymore.
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