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Richard Breeden

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BUSINESS
January 22, 2008 | Dane Hamilton, Reuters
Richard Breeden, founder of activist investment fund Breeden Capital Management, has one goal this year: no proxy battles. But he acknowledges achieving this is unlikely, given his record. Since founding his $1-billion-plus firm 18 months ago, he has launched two major proxy battles that have won him seats on the boards of H&R Block Inc. and Applebee's International Inc. And last Friday, jewelry chain Zale Corp. gave up without a fight, giving Breeden two seats on its board.
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BUSINESS
January 22, 2008 | Dane Hamilton, Reuters
Richard Breeden, founder of activist investment fund Breeden Capital Management, has one goal this year: no proxy battles. But he acknowledges achieving this is unlikely, given his record. Since founding his $1-billion-plus firm 18 months ago, he has launched two major proxy battles that have won him seats on the boards of H&R Block Inc. and Applebee's International Inc. And last Friday, jewelry chain Zale Corp. gave up without a fight, giving Breeden two seats on its board.
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BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Securities and Exchange Commission member Charles C. Cox said Tuesday that he would leave the federal regulatory agency at the end of this month to join a consulting firm. Cox, an SEC commissioner since 1983 and a former chief economist of the agency, said in a brief letter to President Bush that his resignation would take effect Sept. 30, unless his replacement, Richard Breeden, assumes office before that date.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1999 | MILES WEISS, BLOOMBERG NEWS
When he was the top U.S. securities regulator, Richard Breeden busted the biggest scandal to hit the market for U.S. Treasury debt. Now he's joining the board of ESpeed Inc., which operates the largest electronic marketplace for government bonds. Breeden, a former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, isn't alone.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
You might say that Richard Breeden holds the hot seat in the White House. As President Bush's assistant for issue analysis, the 39-year-old Manhattan Beach native is going to be the White House's leading trouble shooter, responsible for pulling together a plan for rescuing the troubled savings and loan industry.
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Bush, filling the final slot in his Cabinet, plans today to name as his secretary of energy retired Adm. James D. Watkins, former chief of naval operations and chairman of the highly regarded presidential commission on AIDS, sources close to Bush said Wednesday. Watkins, 61, fits one of the prime criteria that Bush has laid out for the energy post--knowledge of the nation's nuclear industry and the problems of the country's troubled nuclear weapons plants.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission plans to propose new rules next month to make it easier for stockholders to understand how much corporate executives are being paid, SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said Saturday. U.S. executives are among the most highly paid in the world, and some executives have come under fire for taking huge salaries during an economic slump.
BUSINESS
December 28, 1999 | MILES WEISS, BLOOMBERG NEWS
When he was the top U.S. securities regulator, Richard Breeden busted the biggest scandal to hit the market for U.S. Treasury debt. Now he's joining the board of ESpeed Inc., which operates the largest electronic marketplace for government bonds. Breeden, a former chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, isn't alone.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President Bush Monday named Richard C. Breeden, a key White House aide who played a critical role in crafting the Administration's plan for bailing out the savings and loan industry, to be chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Breeden, 39, a native of Manhattan Beach, will succeed David S. Ruder, a securities expert who announced in May that he would step down to return to Northwestern University. The SEC, an independent agency, regulates the nation's securities markets.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1990 | DAVID A. VISE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The new chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission pulls up to work each day in a red Porsche with a vanity license plate, "1RCB1," and a bumper sticker that says, "Nuke the Duke." A beeper on his belt and a fax machine in his Virginia home keep him in touch with his staff. Six clocks, newly mounted on his office wall, remind him of the trading hours of stock exchanges in London, Chicago, New York, Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong. Richard C.
BUSINESS
May 11, 1992 | From Reuters
The Securities and Exchange Commission plans to propose new rules next month to make it easier for stockholders to understand how much corporate executives are being paid, SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden said Saturday. U.S. executives are among the most highly paid in the world, and some executives have come under fire for taking huge salaries during an economic slump.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's top securities regulator unveiled a broad package of proposals Tuesday intended to make it easier and less costly for cash-hungry small businesses to raise money. Many of the nation's nearly 20 million small businesses--which employ more than half the private-sector work force and produce 50% of the nation's goods and services--have been caught in the "credit crunch" that has made it tough for companies to obtain bank loans.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1990 | DAVID A. VISE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The new chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission pulls up to work each day in a red Porsche with a vanity license plate, "1RCB1," and a bumper sticker that says, "Nuke the Duke." A beeper on his belt and a fax machine in his Virginia home keep him in touch with his staff. Six clocks, newly mounted on his office wall, remind him of the trading hours of stock exchanges in London, Chicago, New York, Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong. Richard C.
BUSINESS
September 13, 1989 | ASSOCIATED PRESS
Securities and Exchange Commission member Charles C. Cox said Tuesday that he would leave the federal regulatory agency at the end of this month to join a consulting firm. Cox, an SEC commissioner since 1983 and a former chief economist of the agency, said in a brief letter to President Bush that his resignation would take effect Sept. 30, unless his replacement, Richard Breeden, assumes office before that date.
BUSINESS
August 15, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President Bush Monday named Richard C. Breeden, a key White House aide who played a critical role in crafting the Administration's plan for bailing out the savings and loan industry, to be chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Breeden, 39, a native of Manhattan Beach, will succeed David S. Ruder, a securities expert who announced in May that he would step down to return to Northwestern University. The SEC, an independent agency, regulates the nation's securities markets.
BUSINESS
January 27, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
You might say that Richard Breeden holds the hot seat in the White House. As President Bush's assistant for issue analysis, the 39-year-old Manhattan Beach native is going to be the White House's leading trouble shooter, responsible for pulling together a plan for rescuing the troubled savings and loan industry.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's top securities regulator unveiled a broad package of proposals Tuesday intended to make it easier and less costly for cash-hungry small businesses to raise money. Many of the nation's nearly 20 million small businesses--which employ more than half the private-sector work force and produce 50% of the nation's goods and services--have been caught in the "credit crunch" that has made it tough for companies to obtain bank loans.
BUSINESS
June 11, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Breeden Urges Controls on Financial Advisers: Rather than make it easier for investors to sue financial planners, the government should watch advisers more closely before clients get cheated, the head of the Securities and Exchange Commission told Congress. SEC Chairman Richard Breeden said more fraud suits against financial planners would be "misguided and counterproductive."
NEWS
January 12, 1989 | DAVID LAUTER, Times Staff Writer
President-elect Bush, filling the final slot in his Cabinet, plans today to name as his secretary of energy retired Adm. James D. Watkins, former chief of naval operations and chairman of the highly regarded presidential commission on AIDS, sources close to Bush said Wednesday. Watkins, 61, fits one of the prime criteria that Bush has laid out for the energy post--knowledge of the nation's nuclear industry and the problems of the country's troubled nuclear weapons plants.
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