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Richard Brooks

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NEWS
March 12, 1992 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Richard Brooks, a tough, muscular storyteller who won a screenwriting Oscar for "Elmer Gantry" and directed "The Blackboard Jungle" and "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at his Beverly Hills home. Brooks, 79, had been ill for a year, a spokesman said, adding that friends and family members were at his side when he died. He was a director who would only let those essential to his films read his scripts.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Those eager to see "Being Mary Jane," the film that serves as the launchpad for BET's first scripted series, which will premiere early next year, might have to take a nap. The film will premiere July 2 at the unusual hour of 10:30 p.m. following the midseason premiere of its signature comedy, "The Game. " "Being Mary Jane" -- the film and the series -- stars Gabrielle Union as a successful TV anchor juggling relationships, work and commitments. The series is the first original project developed for the network by Mara Brock Akil and Salim Akil, the husband-and-wife team behind "The Game," which started at the CW. The couple have an exclusive development deal with BET. The cast of the series includes Richard Roundtree, Omari Hardwick, Richard Brooks and Margaret Avery.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, FORMER TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Richard Brooks, who died on Wednesday at the age of 79, had the true storyteller's gift and it enriched not only his professional life but the lives of all his friends who listened to the anecdotes drawn (and shaped) from his own quite remarkable life. There was the Churchill business. When he was making "Something of Value," he learned that one of the best books about Kenya had been written in the early 1900s by Winston Churchill, a journalist not yet a politician.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By David Ng
The power of Christ has compelled Richard Chamberlain and Brooke Shields to take two of the lead roles in a new stage version of William Peter Blatty's "The Exorcist," which is scheduled to open at the Geffen Playhouse on July 11. Chamberlain will play Father Merrin, the priest who attempts to exorcise a little girl possessed by a demon. The role was played by Max von Sydow in the 1973 film version of Blatty's book. Shields will take on the role of Chris MacNeil, an actress and the girl's  mother, who was played by Ellen Burstyn in the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX
Writer-director Richard Brooks, whose Hollywood career spans five decades and includes "Elmer Gantry," "Key Largo," "The Blackboard Jungle," "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" and "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," will receive the first Life Achievement Award of the Writers Guild of America West and the Directors Guild of America on Sunday at 7 p.m., at DGA headquarters on Sunset Boulevard.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Those eager to see "Being Mary Jane," the film that serves as the launchpad for BET's first scripted series, which will premiere early next year, might have to take a nap. The film will premiere July 2 at the unusual hour of 10:30 p.m. following the midseason premiere of its signature comedy, "The Game. " "Being Mary Jane" -- the film and the series -- stars Gabrielle Union as a successful TV anchor juggling relationships, work and commitments. The series is the first original project developed for the network by Mara Brock Akil and Salim Akil, the husband-and-wife team behind "The Game," which started at the CW. The couple have an exclusive development deal with BET. The cast of the series includes Richard Roundtree, Omari Hardwick, Richard Brooks and Margaret Avery.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Actor Timothy Hutton has won a $9.75-million award against MGM after a Los Angeles Superior Court Jury found that the studio engaged in fraud and breached its contract when it canceled plans for the 1983 movie "Roadshow." Hutton had argued that MGM executives deceived him by telling him the picture was being terminated because the director, Richard Brooks, had suffered a heart attack.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best of the 36 films of writer-director Richard Brooks, who died Wednesday, are available on video. They include: "Key Largo" (MGM/UA, 1948). Brooks shares co-writing credit with director John Huston on this talky, stilted adaptation of Maxwell Anderson's play about a war vet (Humphrey Bogart) confronting a gangster (Edward G. Robinson) in a storm-torn Florida hotel. Film buffs love it because it's one of the few films in which Bogart worked with wife Lauren Bacall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
For more than two years during the Depression, Richard Brooks rode the rails across the country, looking for jobs. At a Hollywood gathering in his honor Sunday night, Brooks remembered waiting one freezing day for a southbound freight at a hobo camp in West Virginia, his clothes lined with newspapers against the bitter chill. He began talking with a laid-off railroad man who also was awaiting what a lyric of the time called a "side-door Pullman car."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011
'Looking for Richard Brooks: An Appreciation' Where: UCLA Film & Television Archive's Billy Wilder Theater, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. When: Friday through May 25 Price: $9 for general admission; $8 for students and seniors Contact: (310) 206-8012 or visit http://www.cinema.ucla.edu
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011
'Looking for Richard Brooks: An Appreciation' Where: UCLA Film & Television Archive's Billy Wilder Theater, 10899 Wilshire Blvd. When: Friday through May 25 Price: $9 for general admission; $8 for students and seniors Contact: (310) 206-8012 or visit http://www.cinema.ucla.edu
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 2011 | Susan King
It seems appropriate that the UCLA Film & Television Archive has called its retrospective on the Oscar-winning writer-director of such film classics as 1955's "Blackboard Jungle," 1960's "Elmer Gantry" and 1967's "In Cold Blood" "Looking for Richard Brooks: An Appreciation. " The title is a play on his last hit, 1977's "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," but it sums up Brooks' reputation in the 19 years since his death. Whereas other writer-directors such as Billy Wilder and John Huston have grown in stature since their demise, Brooks' legacy has been put on the back burner.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, FORMER TIMES ARTS EDITOR
Richard Brooks, who died on Wednesday at the age of 79, had the true storyteller's gift and it enriched not only his professional life but the lives of all his friends who listened to the anecdotes drawn (and shaped) from his own quite remarkable life. There was the Churchill business. When he was making "Something of Value," he learned that one of the best books about Kenya had been written in the early 1900s by Winston Churchill, a journalist not yet a politician.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1992 | DENNIS HUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The best of the 36 films of writer-director Richard Brooks, who died Wednesday, are available on video. They include: "Key Largo" (MGM/UA, 1948). Brooks shares co-writing credit with director John Huston on this talky, stilted adaptation of Maxwell Anderson's play about a war vet (Humphrey Bogart) confronting a gangster (Edward G. Robinson) in a storm-torn Florida hotel. Film buffs love it because it's one of the few films in which Bogart worked with wife Lauren Bacall.
NEWS
March 12, 1992 | EDWARD J. BOYER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Director Richard Brooks, a tough, muscular storyteller who won a screenwriting Oscar for "Elmer Gantry" and directed "The Blackboard Jungle" and "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," died of congestive heart failure Wednesday at his Beverly Hills home. Brooks, 79, had been ill for a year, a spokesman said, adding that friends and family members were at his side when he died. He was a director who would only let those essential to his films read his scripts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 1990 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, TIMES ARTS EDITOR
For more than two years during the Depression, Richard Brooks rode the rails across the country, looking for jobs. At a Hollywood gathering in his honor Sunday night, Brooks remembered waiting one freezing day for a southbound freight at a hobo camp in West Virginia, his clothes lined with newspapers against the bitter chill. He began talking with a laid-off railroad man who also was awaiting what a lyric of the time called a "side-door Pullman car."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 2012 | By David Ng
The power of Christ has compelled Richard Chamberlain and Brooke Shields to take two of the lead roles in a new stage version of William Peter Blatty's "The Exorcist," which is scheduled to open at the Geffen Playhouse on July 11. Chamberlain will play Father Merrin, the priest who attempts to exorcise a little girl possessed by a demon. The role was played by Max von Sydow in the 1973 film version of Blatty's book. Shields will take on the role of Chris MacNeil, an actress and the girl's  mother, who was played by Ellen Burstyn in the movie.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1985
Veteran character actor Rafael Campos, who got his start in the role of a juvenile delinquent in "Blackboard Jungle," has died at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital, a spokeswoman for the Woodland Hills facility confirmed Wednesday. He was 49. Campos, who died Tuesday, had been at the hospital since last December, when stomach cancer was diagnosed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1990 | DAVID J. FOX
Writer-director Richard Brooks, whose Hollywood career spans five decades and includes "Elmer Gantry," "Key Largo," "The Blackboard Jungle," "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof" and "Looking for Mr. Goodbar," will receive the first Life Achievement Award of the Writers Guild of America West and the Directors Guild of America on Sunday at 7 p.m., at DGA headquarters on Sunset Boulevard.
NEWS
February 26, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
Actor Timothy Hutton has won a $9.75-million award against MGM after a Los Angeles Superior Court Jury found that the studio engaged in fraud and breached its contract when it canceled plans for the 1983 movie "Roadshow." Hutton had argued that MGM executives deceived him by telling him the picture was being terminated because the director, Richard Brooks, had suffered a heart attack.
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