Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Butler
IN THE NEWS

Richard Butler

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 26, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
In the band's seminal days early this decade, the Psychedelic Furs seemed strongly influenced by David Bowie's avant-garde side, in their own unique post-punk way. With their last and most successful album, 1987's commercial breakthrough "Midnight to Midnight," some early fans thought the band had followed Bowie's lead once more--by selling out. The new album "Book of Days" should assuage those fears.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 9, 2004 | Elaine Woo, Times Staff Writer
Richard Butler, the rural Idaho pastor who was called "the elder statesman of hate" for the racist campaigns he led as the founder of the Aryan Nations, has died at the age of 86, authorities said Wednesday. Butler, who was living in a modest house in Hayden, Idaho, after losing the longtime headquarters of the Aryan Nations in a lawsuit three years ago, was found dead Wednesday by Kootenai County sheriff's deputies who were summoned to Butler's home by house guests. Capt.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 31, 1991 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ever seen "Midnight Cowboy"? Or "Taxi Driver"? Or "Escape From New York"? Now, who would want to move there, of all places? Wouldn't you rather go to jail? Or eat dirt? Not the Psychedelic Furs, that veteran British alternative rock outfit, who apparently number themselves among the few and the proud who actually love New York. Stranger things have happened, although I can't think of any just now. Maybe the London scene is worse.
NEWS
May 24, 2001 | From Associated Press
For 27 years, Norm Gissel never could have made it past the guard shack at the Aryan Nations headquarters. Now he and other human-rights activists roam the 20-acre compound as if they own the place. That's because they do own it--the result of a lawsuit that bankrupted Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler--and this week they are savoring the demolition of what they call "the campus of hate."
NEWS
February 27, 1998 | ROBIN WRIGHT and NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Breaking his silence on the deal, U.N. chief weapons inspector Richard Butler on Thursday welcomed the new inspections accord reached with Iraq and described clarifications worked out with U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan over the past three days as "entirely satisfactory." But behind the scenes, U.S. and U.N. officials said they still have grave reservations about how the deal will be implemented.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to hate groups that have made the Northwest their clubhouse, the founder of the Aryan Nations has agreed to give up his Idaho compound to satisfy a $6.3-million verdict against the white supremacist organization. Richard Butler, 82, has agreed to hand over the 20-acre property no later than Oct. 25. Under the agreement, he must also give up the property's contents--Nazi and Confederate flags, Third Reich posters, a silver bust of Adolf Hitler and stained glass swastikas.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 5, 2000 | ROGER CATLIN, HARTFORD COURANT
One of the most low-key rock reunions this summer comes from the Psychedelic Furs, a band that was one of rock's most heralded arrivals of the early '80s. The British band behind "Love My Way," "Heaven," "The Ghost in You" and "Pretty in Pink" quietly reunited a few weeks ago without the requisite comeback album, VH1 special or attendant hype. Booked to open a 21-date joint tour by the Go-Go's and B-52's (including Aug. 3 at the Greek Theatre and Aug.
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedraggled but defiant under a light rain, Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler and two dozen supporters carried banners and swastika flags through the streets Saturday, vowing that northern Idaho will remain a haven for the white race. Facing a $6.
NEWS
February 5, 1999 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Butler, the controversial head of the U.N. weapons inspection program in Iraq, said Thursday that he will leave his post when his contract ends in five months. "My contract finishes at the end of June . . . and I don't think that I'll be seeking an extension," he told reporters. Butler's decision is sure to bring joy to Baghdad, which sought to label him as a spy. Two Security Council members--China and Russia--have sharply condemned his blunt style of leadership.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler vowed Saturday that he will not leave northern Idaho, despite a $6.3-million judgment against his organization. At a news conference on the 20-acre Aryan Nations compound, Butler said he did not have the $960,000 cash bond that would be required for him to appeal the judgment issued Thursday by a civil jury. But he said his neo-Nazi sect would continue, even if, as he expects, the compound is seized to pay the judgment.
NEWS
October 29, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bedraggled but defiant under a light rain, Aryan Nations founder Richard Butler and two dozen supporters carried banners and swastika flags through the streets Saturday, vowing that northern Idaho will remain a haven for the white race. Facing a $6.
NEWS
September 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In a blow to hate groups that have made the Northwest their clubhouse, the founder of the Aryan Nations has agreed to give up his Idaho compound to satisfy a $6.3-million verdict against the white supremacist organization. Richard Butler, 82, has agreed to hand over the 20-acre property no later than Oct. 25. Under the agreement, he must also give up the property's contents--Nazi and Confederate flags, Third Reich posters, a silver bust of Adolf Hitler and stained glass swastikas.
NEWS
September 10, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler vowed Saturday that he will not leave northern Idaho, despite a $6.3-million judgment against his organization. At a news conference on the 20-acre Aryan Nations compound, Butler said he did not have the $960,000 cash bond that would be required for him to appeal the judgment issued Thursday by a civil jury. But he said his neo-Nazi sect would continue, even if, as he expects, the compound is seized to pay the judgment.
NEWS
September 8, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a verdict likely to bankrupt one of the nation's most violent white supremacist organizations, an Idaho jury Thursday returned a $6.3-million civil judgment against the Aryan Nations and its founder, Richard Butler--the rural Idaho pastor who has been called "the elder statesman of American hate."
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler conceded Friday that he is the absolute authority at the white supremacist sect's headquarters but said he had no knowledge of his security guards' actions when they shot at and assaulted a woman and her son. Butler's testimony began the final day of plaintiffs' witnesses in Victoria and Jason Keenan's civil rights case against Butler and his Aryan Nations church. The defense is expected to begin laying out its case Tuesday.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | From Reuters
Seven undercover federal agents who posed as journalists to photograph protesters at a civil trial targeting the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations group were stripped of their media passes Thursday after a reporter complained. The FBI agents had obtained the media credentials earlier this week in the trial aimed at bankrupting one of the most potent forces in the U.S. white supremacist movement. On Thursday, Capt.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | From Associated Press
Aryan Nations leader Richard Butler conceded Friday that he is the absolute authority at the white supremacist sect's headquarters but said he had no knowledge of his security guards' actions when they shot at and assaulted a woman and her son. Butler's testimony began the final day of plaintiffs' witnesses in Victoria and Jason Keenan's civil rights case against Butler and his Aryan Nations church. The defense is expected to begin laying out its case Tuesday.
NEWS
September 1, 2000 | From Reuters
Seven undercover federal agents who posed as journalists to photograph protesters at a civil trial targeting the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations group were stripped of their media passes Thursday after a reporter complained. The FBI agents had obtained the media credentials earlier this week in the trial aimed at bankrupting one of the most potent forces in the U.S. white supremacist movement. On Thursday, Capt.
NEWS
August 30, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a landmark civil trial aimed at bankrupting the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations got underway Tuesday, a former lieutenant testified that leader Richard Butler once gave him a bottle to build a crude firebomb intended for the offices of a Jewish real estate broker.
NEWS
August 22, 2000 | KIM MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was an ugly incident on a lonely country road. Victoria Keenan and her teenage son, driving home through the summer twilight, were chased down and beaten outside the neo-Nazi Aryan Nations compound by a truckload of security guards. Two men were sentenced to prison in the 1998 attack. But civil rights groups want more.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|