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Richard C Atkinson

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NEWS
October 3, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
On his first day as president of the University of California, Richard C. Atkinson said Monday that he is seeking the input of corporate "downsizing" experts to help guide a likely trimming of administrative staff at the nine-campus system.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 2003 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A judge Wednesday set bail and a Nov. 10 trial date for a man charged with the stabbing death of a Kern County assistant district attorney. Chris Hillis is charged with first-degree murder in the death of Stephen Tauzer, found in his garage in a pool of blood, a knife sticking out of his head, the weekend of Sept. 13, 2002. Hillis has pleaded not guilty. Judge Robert D. Randall ordered Hillis held in lieu of $2.5-million bail. Defense attorney Kyle J. Humphrey had asked for $1-million bond.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
University of California President Richard C. Atkinson acknowledged Monday that U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham has "reason to be unhappy" with his institution's management of the Los Alamos nuclear weapons facility but pledged to go forward with reforms. Atkinson, who visited employees at the lab near Santa Fe, N.M., on Monday, along with George P. "Pete" Nanos, the facility's new interim director, said that like Abraham, he had been "stunned" to learn of the extent of the problems there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998
Your July 19 editorial ("UC Regents' Many Faces") leaves readers with the impression that at its meeting earlier this month the University of California's Board of Regents endorsed the use of political or financial considerations in decisions about who is admitted to UC. This is not the case. The regents reaffirmed the university's traditional admission criteria--academic achievement, special talents and life experience--and established a policy that financial and political considerations will play no part in admission to UC. No policy can cover every conceivable future circumstance, however, and to allow for a limited measure of flexibility, as the regents did, is not hypocrisy but common sense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
Your May 7 editorial, "Our Ailing Education Master Plan," accurately portrayed the challenges California educators face in trying to fulfill the promises of the Master Plan for Higher Education. Despite the difficulties of continuing to providing low-cost, high-quality college education for all high school graduates, the basic premises upon which the plan is based are as sound today as they were three decades ago when it was conceived. Unfortunately, though, your editorial gave readers a false picture of enrollment trends at the University of California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2003 | Rebecca Trounson, Times Staff Writer
University of California President Richard C. Atkinson acknowledged Monday that U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham has "reason to be unhappy" with his institution's management of the Los Alamos nuclear weapons facility but pledged to go forward with reforms. Atkinson, who visited employees at the lab near Santa Fe, N.M., on Monday, along with George P. "Pete" Nanos, the facility's new interim director, said that like Abraham, he had been "stunned" to learn of the extent of the problems there.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1996
In the aftermath of the passage of Proposition 209 by California voters, the University of California remains firmly committed to diversity. We are working harder than ever to ensure that our doors remain open to students, faculty and staff from throughout California's increasingly diverse society. It would be a tragedy if the public concludes that UC is now closed to students of color. The fact remains that the university will continue to accept every qualified student who seeks admission.
OPINION
September 1, 1985
The Times published an editorial (Aug. 1) about the federal government's efforts to restrict access to four NSF-funded supercomputer centers at the University of Illinois, Cornell University, Princeton University and the University of California, San Diego. Your editorial stated that only the San Diego center agreed to control access to its supercomputer. In fact, the National Science Foundation has acknowledged that the contracts for the four supercomputer centers contain variations in the clause that addresses access by foreign nationals.
NEWS
August 16, 1995 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
A few weeks before a committee of the University of California Board of Regents nominated Richard C. Atkinson to become the next UC president, it voted 7 to 1 against him, sources said Tuesday. That earlier rejection of Atkinson, the 66-year-old chancellor of UC San Diego, came after he performed poorly in his interview with the eight-member presidential search committee, several regents said Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2002 | Rebecca Trounson and Stuart Silverstein, Times Staff Writers
University of California President Richard C. Atkinson, whose criticisms of the widely used SAT exam helped produce major reforms in the test and who steered the university through painful debates about affirmative action, announced Wednesday that he will step down from his post in October.
NEWS
February 20, 2001 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The distinguished, white-haired gentleman who wants to scrap the venerable SAT as an admissions requirement has not made bold action the hallmark of his presidency of the University of California. Richard C. Atkinson usually proceeds with deliberative caution. He grows quickly uncomfortable at the first stirrings of discord. He works hard at keeping a lid on controversy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 19, 2001 | AARON ZITNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
College and university presidents from across the country Sunday defended the SAT as a possibly flawed yet important tool in evaluating students. And many said they were hesitant to follow UC President Richard C. Atkinson in calling for elimination of the test as an admissions requirement. "At present, it's the best measure we have for determining the level of preparedness of students and their potential for success," said Freeman A.
NEWS
September 14, 2000 | From Associated Press
The issue of which students are admitted to the University of California resurfaced Wednesday as UC President Richard Atkinson told regents he wants to evaluate new approaches to admissions in light of developments since the school scrapped affirmative action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1998
Your July 19 editorial ("UC Regents' Many Faces") leaves readers with the impression that at its meeting earlier this month the University of California's Board of Regents endorsed the use of political or financial considerations in decisions about who is admitted to UC. This is not the case. The regents reaffirmed the university's traditional admission criteria--academic achievement, special talents and life experience--and established a policy that financial and political considerations will play no part in admission to UC. No policy can cover every conceivable future circumstance, however, and to allow for a limited measure of flexibility, as the regents did, is not hypocrisy but common sense.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a judge having suspending enforcement of Proposition 209, the University of California will use race, gender and ethnicity to evaluate the 70,000 high school and community college students who have applied for admission, UC President Richard C. Atkinson has confirmed.
NEWS
January 9, 1988 | PHILIP HAGER, Times Staff Writer
The state Supreme Court has rejected a bid by a former Harvard professor to sue UC San Diego Chancellor Richard C. Atkinson for allegedly tricking her into an abortion with a fraudulent promise to father another child. The justices, in a brief order issued late Thursday, refused to hear an appeal by Lee Perry of a state appellate court decision in September barring her from suing for deceitful failure to impregnate.
NEWS
December 28, 1996 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With a judge having suspending enforcement of Proposition 209, the University of California will use race, gender and ethnicity to evaluate the 70,000 high school and community college students who have applied for admission, UC President Richard C. Atkinson has confirmed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1996
In the aftermath of the passage of Proposition 209 by California voters, the University of California remains firmly committed to diversity. We are working harder than ever to ensure that our doors remain open to students, faculty and staff from throughout California's increasingly diverse society. It would be a tragedy if the public concludes that UC is now closed to students of color. The fact remains that the university will continue to accept every qualified student who seeks admission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1996
Your May 7 editorial, "Our Ailing Education Master Plan," accurately portrayed the challenges California educators face in trying to fulfill the promises of the Master Plan for Higher Education. Despite the difficulties of continuing to providing low-cost, high-quality college education for all high school graduates, the basic premises upon which the plan is based are as sound today as they were three decades ago when it was conceived. Unfortunately, though, your editorial gave readers a false picture of enrollment trends at the University of California.
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