Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard C Breeden
IN THE NEWS

Richard C Breeden

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
August 15, 1989 | ART PINE, Times Staff Writer
President Bush Monday named Richard C. Breeden, a key White House aide who played a critical role in crafting the Administration's plan for bailing out the savings and loan industry, to be chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission. Breeden, 39, a native of Manhattan Beach, will succeed David S. Ruder, a securities expert who announced in May that he would step down to return to Northwestern University. The SEC, an independent agency, regulates the nation's securities markets.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC Chief Will Leave by April 15: SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden, who presided over a three-year expansion of the Wall Street watchdog and its authority, said he plans to resign by April 15. After weeks of coyly deflecting questions about when he would be leaving, Breeden, 43, issued a statement saying he would return to the private sector "not later than April 15, unless a successor is in place sooner."
Advertisement
BUSINESS
January 8, 1990 | DAVID A. VISE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The new chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission pulls up to work each day in a red Porsche with a vanity license plate, "1RCB1," and a bumper sticker that says, "Nuke the Duke." A beeper on his belt and a fax machine in his Virginia home keep him in touch with his staff. Six clocks, newly mounted on his office wall, remind him of the trading hours of stock exchanges in London, Chicago, New York, Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong. Richard C.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Breeden Urges Capital Charge on Bank's Bonds: Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Richard C. Breeden said financial rules are partly to blame for the credit crunch because they give banks an incentive to invest in government bonds rather than lend out money. Speaking to a small-business conference, Breeden suggested that banks have been plowing money into government bonds rather than lending the funds out because they do not have to set aside funds when they buy Treasury securities.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's top securities regulator unveiled a broad package of proposals Tuesday intended to make it easier and less costly for cash-hungry small businesses to raise money. Many of the nation's nearly 20 million small businesses--which employ more than half the private-sector work force and produce 50% of the nation's goods and services--have been caught in the "credit crunch" that has made it tough for companies to obtain bank loans.
BUSINESS
October 6, 1989
The Senate has confirmed Richard C. Breeden as chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, the agency that polices the U.S. financial markets. Breeden, 39, an aide to President Bush who guided the savings and loan bailout package through Congress, was approved by a voice vote of the full Senate without debate. He replaces David S. Ruder, who held the job for two years before returning last week to Northwestern University in Chicago to teach securities law.
BUSINESS
February 12, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
SEC Chief Will Leave by April 15: SEC Chairman Richard C. Breeden, who presided over a three-year expansion of the Wall Street watchdog and its authority, said he plans to resign by April 15. After weeks of coyly deflecting questions about when he would be leaving, Breeden, 43, issued a statement saying he would return to the private sector "not later than April 15, unless a successor is in place sooner."
BUSINESS
March 3, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Breeden Urges Capital Charge on Bank's Bonds: Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Richard C. Breeden said financial rules are partly to blame for the credit crunch because they give banks an incentive to invest in government bonds rather than lend out money. Speaking to a small-business conference, Breeden suggested that banks have been plowing money into government bonds rather than lending the funds out because they do not have to set aside funds when they buy Treasury securities.
BUSINESS
February 19, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The nation's top securities regulator unveiled a broad package of proposals Tuesday intended to make it easier and less costly for cash-hungry small businesses to raise money. Many of the nation's nearly 20 million small businesses--which employ more than half the private-sector work force and produce 50% of the nation's goods and services--have been caught in the "credit crunch" that has made it tough for companies to obtain bank loans.
BUSINESS
February 17, 1992 | From Associated Press
Less than a week after stepping into the fray over big pay for corporate executives, the nation's top stock regulator is proposing ways to help small business raise money during the credit crunch. Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Richard Breeden was prepared to outline proposals to lift the regulatory burden on small companies that can't afford to "go public"--raising money through a public stock offering.
BUSINESS
March 3, 1990 | OSWALD JOHNSTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Securities and Exchange Commission managed the collapse of Drexel Burnham Lambert without any cost so far to taxpayers even though the regulatory agency was severely hampered by a lack of crucial information, the SEC chairman said Friday. In his first public comments on the Drexel debacle, Chairman Richard C. Breeden told the Senate Banking Committee that financial markets rode out the storm with only minor disruptions.
BUSINESS
January 8, 1990 | DAVID A. VISE, THE WASHINGTON POST
The new chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission pulls up to work each day in a red Porsche with a vanity license plate, "1RCB1," and a bumper sticker that says, "Nuke the Duke." A beeper on his belt and a fax machine in his Virginia home keep him in touch with his staff. Six clocks, newly mounted on his office wall, remind him of the trading hours of stock exchanges in London, Chicago, New York, Sydney, Tokyo and Hong Kong. Richard C.
BUSINESS
October 14, 1989
Securities and Exchange Commission Chairman Richard C. Breeden, sworn in only two days ago, was holed up in his office taking conference calls Friday and unavailable for comment on the steep market plunge. Telephone lines to his office were jammed. Assistants said they did not know whether the chairman would issue a statement. But the new chairman already is on record opposing SEC intervention to close markets in the event of a crash.
BUSINESS
March 1, 1989 | JAMES S. GRANELLI, Times Staff Writer
The architect of President Bush's plan to rescue struggling savings and loan associations urged bankers Tuesday at a convention in Anaheim to "play a major role" in supporting the industry overhaul. Richard C. Breeden, an assistant to the President, told members of the Independent Bankers Assn. of America that they should encourage "neighbors, customers and your local newspapers" to lobby for swift approval of the legislation, which was introduced in Congress last week.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|