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Richard C Eastman

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NATIONAL
December 7, 2003 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
"Subject No. 4" died at 1:44 a.m. on June 14, 1999, in the immense federal research clinic of the National Institutes of Health. The cause of death was clear: a complication from an experimental treatment for kidney inflammation using a drug made by a German company, Schering AG. Among the first to be notified was Dr. Stephen I. Katz, the senior NIH official whose institute conducted the study. Unbeknown to the participants, Katz also was a paid consultant to Schering AG.
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NATIONAL
December 7, 2003 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
"Subject No. 4" died at 1:44 a.m. on June 14, 1999, in the immense federal research clinic of the National Institutes of Health. The cause of death was clear: a complication from an experimental treatment for kidney inflammation using a drug made by a German company, Schering AG. Among the first to be notified was Dr. Stephen I. Katz, the senior NIH official whose institute conducted the study. Unbeknown to the participants, Katz also was a paid consultant to Schering AG.
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NEWS
December 16, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the National Institutes of Health said Tuesday that he has requested an internal review of the financial ties between the federal government's top diabetes researcher and a major pharmaceutical company. Dr. Harold E. Varmus, the NIH director, said he wants the institutes' office of inspector general to examine "whether any violation of law and/or regulations occurred."
NEWS
December 16, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of the National Institutes of Health said Tuesday that he has requested an internal review of the financial ties between the federal government's top diabetes researcher and a major pharmaceutical company. Dr. Harold E. Varmus, the NIH director, said he wants the institutes' office of inspector general to examine "whether any violation of law and/or regulations occurred."
NEWS
December 7, 1998
'The medication [Rezulin] is something that really does add value to patients. We've tried to be very highly responsible in everything that we've done.' --Dr. Robert L. Zerbe Warner-Lambert official * 'They [government officials] are not supposed to be consultants to drug companies.' --Dr. George J. Galasso Retired NIH official * 'To not deal honestly and candidly is a recipe for disaster. I think to a man, everybody in this organization has taken the issue very seriously.'
NEWS
June 4, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The suffering persisted for more than two years. Initially, there were four known victims. Then 21. Then 33. Finally, 63 confirmed fatalities. All the while, federal authorities watched, waited and hoped the deaths would stop. It was not until a disparate collection of physicians inside the U.S. Food and Drug Administration waged a remarkable revolt that the agency was forced to reverse course.
NEWS
December 23, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saying that the issues "go to the heart of the public's confidence" in the Food and Drug Administration, three senior House Democrats are seeking answers to extensive questions about the agency's approval of the diabetes pill Rezulin. In a four-page letter to Dr. Jane E. Henney, the newly installed FDA commissioner, Reps. John D. Dingell of Michigan, Sherrod Brown of Ohio and Henry A.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2004 | David Willman, Times Staff Writer
The National Institutes of Health has not yet reported to Congress how much money its scientists have made consulting for drug companies despite a request made more than two months ago, a subcommittee chairman complained Wednesday. Rep. James C. Greenwood (R-Pa.), chairman of the House Oversight and Investigations Subcommittee, asked Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson for his assistance in forcing disclosure.
NEWS
August 16, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal prosecutors are examining aspects of the government's rapid approval and delayed withdrawal of Rezulin, the blockbuster diabetes drug linked to 63 liver-failure deaths. According to people familiar with the matter, several Food and Drug Administration officials have been questioned in the last month by prosecutors assigned to the office of the U.S. attorney in Greenbelt, Md.
NEWS
December 9, 1998 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling the issues "serious," Rep. Henry A. Waxman (D-Los Angeles) has posed detailed questions to the head of the National Institutes of Health concerning the financial ties between the government's top diabetes researcher and a major pharmaceutical company. In a letter to Dr. Harold E.
NEWS
September 4, 1999 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Federal investigators examining whether the top diabetes researcher at the National Institutes of Health had a conflict of interest while overseeing a $150-million government study of diabetes will be asked to review a second scientist's financial ties to the drug Rezulin. A spokeswoman for NIH Director Harold E. Varmus said that officials want to determine whether proper procedures were followed in the government study of Rezulin concerning the role of Dr. Jerrold M.
NEWS
March 23, 2000 | DAVID WILLMAN and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In December 1997, the diabetes pill Rezulin was taken off pharmacy shelves in Britain because of concern about liver damage to patients in the United States. Within a year, the Food and Drug Administration had learned of a torrent of additional cases. And by March 1999, agency specialists found the problem had grown far larger: More than 400 Rezulin patients, they estimated, had suffered liver failure.
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