Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard C Jones
IN THE NEWS

Richard C Jones

MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
A cryonics laboratory and the family of an award-winning television writer whose remains were frozen at the lab are locked in a dispute over millions of dollars in residuals from hit television shows, attorneys said. The body of Richard C. Jones, a three-time Emmy Award-winning writer-producer who worked under the name Dick Clair, was frozen at Alcor Life Extension Laboratory in Riverside this week after he died of an AIDS-related illness, The San Bernardino Sun newspaper reported Friday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
While Richard C. Jones' body lay suspended in a tank of liquid nitrogen at a warehouse in Riverside on Tuesday, a bitter tug-of-war commenced in Los Angeles Superior Court over the Emmy-winning television producer's deathbed decision to change his will, cutting by half the $10-million legacy he had previously left to a cryonics laboratory. In 1987, Jones, who worked under the name of Dick Clair, set up a will and trust to give his $1-million Toluca Lake estate and residuals from hit televisions shows, including "It's a Living," to the Alcor Life Extension Foundation of Riverside, which freezes bodies in hopes of reviving them at some future date.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1989 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, Times Staff Writer
While Richard C. Jones' body lay suspended in a tank of liquid nitrogen at a warehouse in Riverside on Tuesday, a bitter tug-of-war commenced in Los Angeles Superior Court over the Emmy-winning television producer's deathbed decision to change his will, cutting by half the $10-million legacy he had previously left to a cryonics laboratory. In 1987, Jones, who worked under the name of Dick Clair, set up a will and trust to give his $1-million Toluca Lake estate and residuals from hit televisions shows, including "It's a Living," to the Alcor Life Extension Foundation of Riverside, which freezes bodies in hopes of reviving them at some future date.
NEWS
December 17, 1988 | Associated Press
A cryonics laboratory and the family of an award-winning television writer whose remains were frozen at the lab are locked in a dispute over millions of dollars in residuals from hit television shows, attorneys said. The body of Richard C. Jones, a three-time Emmy Award-winning writer-producer who worked under the name Dick Clair, was frozen at Alcor Life Extension Laboratory in Riverside this week after he died of an AIDS-related illness, The San Bernardino Sun newspaper reported Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1991 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Grants for Black Filmmakers: Daresha Kyi's 23-minute "Land Where My Fathers Died," a 23-minute narrative about African-American women and love, took the $3,000 top prize among 26 entries in the ninth annual Black Filmmakers' Grants competition held Saturday at the community center of the Baldwin Hills Mall at Crenshaw Center. The second-place award of $2,000 went to Ronald K. Armstrong's 17-minute allegory on racism, "Cuny Island." The third-place, $1,000 winner was Richard C.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1991 | KEVIN THOMAS
Deresha Kyi took the top prize of $3,000 in the ninth annual Black Filmmakers' Grants Program with her "Lands Where My Fathers Died," a brief, beautifully acted vignette in which a young, ambitious couple are awkwardly confronted with a heritage of defeat during a family reunion. Second prize of $2,000 went to Ronald Armstrong for "Cuny Island," a sly, witty allegory on racism, and Richard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 1999 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He was a quiet man, the kind of person who keeps his business and his problems to himself. So homicide investigators had their work cut out for them Wednesday as they searched for clues into the murder of surgeon and businessman Dr. Jagjit Singh Sehdeva in his hilltop home overlooking the ocean in Playa del Rey. Sehdeva, 60, was shot to death about 9:20 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has given renewed life to a group that freezes the dead in hopes they may be revived someday. Judge Aurelio Munoz ruled Tuesday that it is illegal for the state Department of Health Services to refuse to provide death certificates and body disposition permits for those who want their bodies frozen after death. Until now, those who had chosen to have their bodies frozen after death have been left in legal limbo.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1990 | CAROL McGRAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Los Angeles Superior Court judge has given renewed life to a group that freezes the dead in hopes they may be revived someday. Judge Aurelio Munoz ruled Tuesday that it is illegal for the state Department of Health Services to refuse to provide death certificates and body disposition permits for those who want their bodies frozen after death. Until now, those who had chosen to have their bodies frozen after death have been left in legal limbo.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|