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Richard C Miller

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ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Even behind the dignified fringe of white beard, Richard C. Miller seems astonished about all the fuss. In his spacious living room in Calabasas overlooking a sweep of hills, fragrant scrub and what's left of wild L.A., friends and visiting family members buzz about. There's a digital audio recorder placed on the dining room table that runs continuously, and so too does a video camera, recording the 95-year-old's slightest gesture, hoping to catch one more unearthed thought or anecdote.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson
As photographer Richard C. Miller documented the construction of the four-level freeway interchange in mid-20th century downtown Los Angeles, he was overwhelmed by its man-made beauty. "I saw it and just went out of my mind," he later wrote. "I thought, 'My God, this is how people must have felt when they first saw the cathedrals in Europe.'" Miller forged a career in the 1940s and 1950s photographing celebrities. But the images Miller took for his own pleasure, especially of the unfolding of the Hollywood Freeway, showcase an independent vision, said Craig Krull, whose Santa Monica gallery this year staged a show of Miller's work.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 2010 | Valerie J. Nelson
As photographer Richard C. Miller documented the construction of the four-level freeway interchange in mid-20th century downtown Los Angeles, he was overwhelmed by its man-made beauty. "I saw it and just went out of my mind," he later wrote. "I thought, 'My God, this is how people must have felt when they first saw the cathedrals in Europe.'" Miller forged a career in the 1940s and 1950s photographing celebrities. But the images Miller took for his own pleasure, especially of the unfolding of the Hollywood Freeway, showcase an independent vision, said Craig Krull, whose Santa Monica gallery this year staged a show of Miller's work.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Lynell George
Imagine Los Angeles as an unfinished sentence: big, open fields; no homes or other clutter hugging the Pacific; dirt roads from downtown to Pasadena. To see Los Angeles, before its superstructure of freeways and sweeping transition roads, summons up a different sort of narrative. Richard C. Miller was there to watch L.A. transform, and lucky for us he carried his camera with him -- either a 35-millimeter or a 4-by-5. He took long drives at night to clear his head, wandered out to the edge of settled L.A. and brought back tens of thousands of images of street corners, stop signs, old traffic lights, parking lots, gas stations, dirt roads, open fields -- unfolding, rolling space where now a grown-up city crowds together.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 2010 | By Lynell George
Imagine Los Angeles as an unfinished sentence: big, open fields; no homes or other clutter hugging the Pacific; dirt roads from downtown to Pasadena. To see Los Angeles, before its superstructure of freeways and sweeping transition roads, summons up a different sort of narrative. Richard C. Miller was there to watch L.A. transform, and lucky for us he carried his camera with him -- either a 35-millimeter or a 4-by-5. He took long drives at night to clear his head, wandered out to the edge of settled L.A. and brought back tens of thousands of images of street corners, stop signs, old traffic lights, parking lots, gas stations, dirt roads, open fields -- unfolding, rolling space where now a grown-up city crowds together.
BUSINESS
September 4, 1986
Sun-Diamond Growers of California named William R. Nelson and Richard C. Miller senior vice presidents and management board members of the Pleasanton-based agricultural cooperative, with Nelson also directing sales and Miller directing business management and marketing. Both were executives with CPC International, a food service company based in New Jersey. Sun-Diamond markets Sun-Maid Raisins, Diamond Walnuts, Sunsweet Prunes and Blue Ribbon Figs.
NEWS
August 1, 1987 | JACK NELSON and JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writers
After almost 11 weeks of congressional hearings on the Iran- contra scandal and voluminous testimony of document shredding and attempts to cover up the diversion of U.S. funds to the Nicaraguan rebels, President Reagan said Friday that he has heard nothing indicating that any laws were broken.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2007 | Lynell George, Times Staff Writer
Even behind the dignified fringe of white beard, Richard C. Miller seems astonished about all the fuss. In his spacious living room in Calabasas overlooking a sweep of hills, fragrant scrub and what's left of wild L.A., friends and visiting family members buzz about. There's a digital audio recorder placed on the dining room table that runs continuously, and so too does a video camera, recording the 95-year-old's slightest gesture, hoping to catch one more unearthed thought or anecdote.
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