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June 4, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Activist investor Carl Icahn claimed two victories in his fight to place dissident shareholders on Biogen Idec Inc.'s board, but the biotechnology company has not yet finished tallying votes. Icahn wants to seat four shareholders on Biogen's 13-member board as part of a years-long dispute with the company's direction. The proxy fight culminated in Biogen's annual meeting in Cambridge, Mass., but the company recessed for most of the day, saying it needed to give shareholders more time to vote.
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BUSINESS
June 4, 2009 | TIMES WIRE REPORTS
Activist investor Carl Icahn claimed two victories in his fight to place dissident shareholders on Biogen Idec Inc.'s board, but the biotechnology company has not yet finished tallying votes. Icahn wants to seat four shareholders on Biogen's 13-member board as part of a years-long dispute with the company's direction. The proxy fight culminated in Biogen's annual meeting in Cambridge, Mass., but the company recessed for most of the day, saying it needed to give shareholders more time to vote.
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NEWS
December 14, 1987 | BARRY SIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
As the young microbiologist Richard C. Mulligan delivered a speech about human gene therapy before an Institute of Medicine conference here on Oct. 15 of last year, W. French Anderson sat in the audience, listening intently. Mulligan, after all, was talking about something Anderson had been feverishly pursuing for years. I want to win, I want to be the first to do human gene therapy, Anderson had often said.
NEWS
December 13, 1987 | BARRY SIEGEL, Times Staff Writer
Late in the morning last Monday, two scientists faced each other, one sitting, one standing, in a small conference room here at the National Institutes of Health. W. French Anderson, 50, director of the laboratory of molecular hematology at the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, had been explaining to an NIH advisory committee why he wanted to make the first authorized attempt to change a sick human being's genes.
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