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Richard C Reid

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NATIONAL
June 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
An emergency medical technician testified Tuesday that Richard C. Reid had slurred speech and appeared sluggish as he was questioned by the FBI for allegedly trying to blow up a jetliner with explosives hidden in his shoes. The testimony came during a hearing on Reid's request to suppress statements made after his arrest. Reid's lawyers claim he was still feeling the effects of Valium and sedatives that passengers forcibly injected into him while trying to restrain him.
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NATIONAL
October 5, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Federal authorities Monday accused a 25-year-old student already in custody in Britain of conspiring with attempted "shoe bomber" Richard Reid to bring down a Paris-to-Miami flight, saying he may have had designs on destroying other aircraft and targets. The seven-count indictment, unsealed in Boston, accuses Sajid Mohammed Badat of attempted murder, trying to destroy an aircraft and aiding and abetting Reid.
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NATIONAL
January 31, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
BOSTON -- Richard Reid was given three life sentences plus 110 additional years in prison Thursday as a federal judge here extolled the virtues of American freedom and justice, and the angry terrorist warned the United States that Allah "will give victory to his religion."
NATIONAL
January 31, 2003 | Richard A. Serrano, Times Staff Writer
BOSTON -- Richard Reid was given three life sentences plus 110 additional years in prison Thursday as a federal judge here extolled the virtues of American freedom and justice, and the angry terrorist warned the United States that Allah "will give victory to his religion."
NATIONAL
October 5, 2004 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
Federal authorities Monday accused a 25-year-old student already in custody in Britain of conspiring with attempted "shoe bomber" Richard Reid to bring down a Paris-to-Miami flight, saying he may have had designs on destroying other aircraft and targets. The seven-count indictment, unsealed in Boston, accuses Sajid Mohammed Badat of attempted murder, trying to destroy an aircraft and aiding and abetting Reid.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Escalating their courtroom offensive against suspected terrorists, authorities brought nine criminal counts Wednesday against alleged shoe bomber Richard C. Reid, alleging that he was an Al Qaeda-trained operative who plotted to blow a Miami-bound flight out of the sky last month. Reid was overwhelmed by passengers and flight attendants aboard American Airlines Flight 63 after he was seen trying to light a wire in his shoe.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | JOSH MEYER and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge on Monday ordered a man suspected of trying to detonate explosives aboard a Paris-to-Miami flight held without bail, as authorities on both sides of the Atlantic struggled to learn more about the mysterious passenger and his motives. A bedraggled Richard C. Reid gave only a few one-word answers during his brief court appearance, where federal prosecutors urged that the 28-year-old British citizen be held until a detention hearing Friday. They told U.S.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
A judge threw out one of nine charges against a man accused of trying to blow up a jetliner with explosives in his shoes, ruling Tuesday that an airplane is not a vehicle under a new anti-terrorism law. The charge, attempting to wreck a mass transportation vehicle, was filed under the USA Patriot Act, which was passed by Congress after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. U.S.
NEWS
December 29, 2001 | GREG MILLER and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
British bombing suspect Richard C. Reid had a potentially catastrophic mix of explosives in his shoes that, if ignited, could have blown a hole in the fuselage of the Miami-bound jet he boarded in Paris last week, authorities said Friday. An FBI agent testified at a U.S. District Court hearing here that government scientists concluded that the shoes contained triacetone triperoxide, or TATP, a highly volatile material that has been used in previous terrorist bombing plots.
NATIONAL
June 19, 2002 | From Associated Press
An emergency medical technician testified Tuesday that Richard C. Reid had slurred speech and appeared sluggish as he was questioned by the FBI for allegedly trying to blow up a jetliner with explosives hidden in his shoes. The testimony came during a hearing on Reid's request to suppress statements made after his arrest. Reid's lawyers claim he was still feeling the effects of Valium and sedatives that passengers forcibly injected into him while trying to restrain him.
NATIONAL
June 12, 2002 | From Associated Press
A judge threw out one of nine charges against a man accused of trying to blow up a jetliner with explosives in his shoes, ruling Tuesday that an airplane is not a vehicle under a new anti-terrorism law. The charge, attempting to wreck a mass transportation vehicle, was filed under the USA Patriot Act, which was passed by Congress after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. U.S.
NEWS
January 17, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Escalating their courtroom offensive against suspected terrorists, authorities brought nine criminal counts Wednesday against alleged shoe bomber Richard C. Reid, alleging that he was an Al Qaeda-trained operative who plotted to blow a Miami-bound flight out of the sky last month. Reid was overwhelmed by passengers and flight attendants aboard American Airlines Flight 63 after he was seen trying to light a wire in his shoe.
NEWS
December 29, 2001 | GREG MILLER and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
British bombing suspect Richard C. Reid had a potentially catastrophic mix of explosives in his shoes that, if ignited, could have blown a hole in the fuselage of the Miami-bound jet he boarded in Paris last week, authorities said Friday. An FBI agent testified at a U.S. District Court hearing here that government scientists concluded that the shoes contained triacetone triperoxide, or TATP, a highly volatile material that has been used in previous terrorist bombing plots.
NEWS
December 25, 2001 | JOSH MEYER and SEBASTIAN ROTELLA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A federal judge on Monday ordered a man suspected of trying to detonate explosives aboard a Paris-to-Miami flight held without bail, as authorities on both sides of the Atlantic struggled to learn more about the mysterious passenger and his motives. A bedraggled Richard C. Reid gave only a few one-word answers during his brief court appearance, where federal prosecutors urged that the 28-year-old British citizen be held until a detention hearing Friday. They told U.S.
WORLD
July 20, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
DNA tests have confirmed that a body found in a shallow grave in Pakistan is that of Wall Street Journal reporter Daniel Pearl, a U.S. official said on condition of anonymity. Pakistani police have been informed of the results, the official said in Washington. Pearl disappeared Jan. 23 in Karachi while researching links between Pakistani extremists and Richard C. Reid, arrested in December on a flight from Paris to Miami with explosives in his shoes. Pearl's body was found in May.
WORLD
August 27, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Radical Muslim cleric Abu Hamza al Masri was arrested on suspicion of preparing or instigating unspecified "acts of terrorism," a move that could delay U.S. attempts to extradite him on charges that include trying to establish a terrorist training camp in Oregon. Abu Hamza already was being held on the U.S. warrant. The cleric's London mosque has been linked to several terrorist suspects, including Sept. 11 suspect Zacarias Moussaoui and "shoe bomber" Richard C. Reid.
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