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Richard Carmona

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NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Richard Carmona, who served as U.S. surgeon general in George W. Bush's administration, announced Thursday that he will run as a Democrat for Arizona's open U.S. Senate seat. Carmona, who turns 62 this month, said in a statement that Washington is broken and that it was time "for honest people with real world experience to step forward. " "As a Special Forces medic in Vietnam, a trauma surgeon, and deputy sheriff in Arizona - we never had time for petty squabbles or gamesmanship - we had to work together to get results," he said in a statement.
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NEWS
November 10, 2011 | By Michael A. Memoli
Richard Carmona, who served as U.S. surgeon general in George W. Bush's administration, announced Thursday that he will run as a Democrat for Arizona's open U.S. Senate seat. Carmona, who turns 62 this month, said in a statement that Washington is broken and that it was time "for honest people with real world experience to step forward. " "As a Special Forces medic in Vietnam, a trauma surgeon, and deputy sheriff in Arizona - we never had time for petty squabbles or gamesmanship - we had to work together to get results," he said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
May 4, 2005 | From Reuters
More needs to be done to combat smoking and the disease burden it inflicts on society, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona testified Tuesday in the government's racketeering case against cigarette makers. "There is clearly work that needs to be done in the future," Carmona told U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler in Washington as the government laid out a case for changes in the tobacco industry if the judge concludes that it violated racketeering law.
BUSINESS
May 4, 2005 | From Reuters
More needs to be done to combat smoking and the disease burden it inflicts on society, U.S. Surgeon General Richard H. Carmona testified Tuesday in the government's racketeering case against cigarette makers. "There is clearly work that needs to be done in the future," Carmona told U.S. District Judge Gladys Kessler in Washington as the government laid out a case for changes in the tobacco industry if the judge concludes that it violated racketeering law.
NATIONAL
July 8, 2002 | ANN-EVE PEDERSEN and MEGAN GARVEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson first sat down to talk with Richard Carmona about becoming surgeon general, the candidate seemed almost too good to be true. An up-from-nothing New York City street kid from Harlem. A high school dropout turned decorated Vietnam War veteran turned trauma surgeon. A moonlighting SWAT team member who shot a suspect dead to protect others and dangled from a helicopter in a daring mountain-side rescue.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 17 years in this desert city, Richard Carmona, President Bush's choice for U.S. surgeon general, has become one of Tucson's most visible and sometimes controversial figures. As a doctor and SWAT team member, his swashbuckling persona has made him a cult figure in law enforcement. But he also hasn't shied from controversy, which may well come up during his confirmation hearings. Carmona, for his part, is taking it one step at a time.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY and ANN-EVE PEDERSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Carmona, President Bush's candidate for surgeon general, described himself Tuesday as a "people's doctor" who ably managed a trauma center, a hospital and a public health system in Tucson and still had time to moonlight on the sheriff's SWAT team. Carmona, 52, testifying at his confirmation hearing before a Senate committee, said his nomination as one of the nation's top doctors was the culmination of "my apparently disjointed career paths."
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Arizonans will soon see the end of a U.S. Senate race that's recently tightened between Republican U.S. Rep. Jeff Flake and his Democratic opponent, Richard Carmona, who is seeking to become the state's first Latino senator. Carmona's campaign recently complained about Flake campaign robocalls that gave some Democratic voters incorrect information about their polling places. FULL COVERAGE: Election 2012
NEWS
November 6, 2012 | By Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON - Former Surgeon General Richard Carmona, a Democrat, was unable to overcome Republican Rep. Jeff Flake, keeping the Senate seat from Arizona in the GOP column. Carmona enjoyed a late surge in the historically Republican state as a moderate, and Latino, candidate, with the state showing signs of an emerging Democratic tilt. But funding from Democrats nationally and a visit from former President Clinton were not enough to outpace Flake, a six-term congressman from Mesa who isĀ  a conservative leader in the House.
NATIONAL
July 18, 2002 | From Associated Press
A Senate committee unanimously approved the nomination of Dr. Richard Carmona as surgeon general Wednesday, despite questions about his medical record and work history. The vote by the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee was conducted quickly at an informal meeting just off the Senate floor. The nomination now goes to the full Senate, which must confirm Carmona to the post, which has been vacant since Dr. David Satcher's term expired in February.
NATIONAL
July 10, 2002 | MEGAN GARVEY and ANN-EVE PEDERSEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Carmona, President Bush's candidate for surgeon general, described himself Tuesday as a "people's doctor" who ably managed a trauma center, a hospital and a public health system in Tucson and still had time to moonlight on the sheriff's SWAT team. Carmona, 52, testifying at his confirmation hearing before a Senate committee, said his nomination as one of the nation's top doctors was the culmination of "my apparently disjointed career paths."
NATIONAL
July 8, 2002 | ANN-EVE PEDERSEN and MEGAN GARVEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy G. Thompson first sat down to talk with Richard Carmona about becoming surgeon general, the candidate seemed almost too good to be true. An up-from-nothing New York City street kid from Harlem. A high school dropout turned decorated Vietnam War veteran turned trauma surgeon. A moonlighting SWAT team member who shot a suspect dead to protect others and dangled from a helicopter in a daring mountain-side rescue.
NEWS
March 29, 2002 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In his 17 years in this desert city, Richard Carmona, President Bush's choice for U.S. surgeon general, has become one of Tucson's most visible and sometimes controversial figures. As a doctor and SWAT team member, his swashbuckling persona has made him a cult figure in law enforcement. But he also hasn't shied from controversy, which may well come up during his confirmation hearings. Carmona, for his part, is taking it one step at a time.
NATIONAL
March 2, 2006 | From Times Wire Reports
America's obesity epidemic will dwarf the threat of terrorism if the nation does not reduce the number of people who are severely overweight, the surgeon general said in Columbia. "Obesity is the terror within," Richard H. Carmona said in a University of South Carolina lecture. "Unless we do something about it, the magnitude of the dilemma will dwarf 9/11 or any other terrorist attempt. "Where will our soldiers and sailors and airmen come from?" he said.
NEWS
November 11, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
When former U.S. Surgeon General Richard Carmona declared Thursday that he was running for the Senate from Arizona, it was a surprise to almost no one, except, it seems, Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta. Only two days earlier, Panetta had announced that Carmona would head a special panel to examine operations at the military's Dover mortuary, which has been rocked in recent days by the disclosures that it mishandled remains of troops killed in Iraq and Afghanistan. Panetta was even touting the appointment at a Pentagon press conference Thursday afternoon, more than two hours after Carmona announced his candidacy for the Senate.
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