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Richard Chapleau

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | PETER ROBERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Roberson is a Washington-based reporter for States News Service
Richard Chapleau, 40, became a high school teacher only six years ago, after waiting tables and an assortment of odd jobs. Nothing that Chapleau, who now teaches chemistry at Palmdale High School, did during his pre-teacher years made him a likely candidate to be honored in the White House Rose Garden. But on Friday, he was there as California's Teacher of the Year, honored with his counterparts from around the country by President Clinton and Education Secretary Richard Riley.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life a mess, Dick Chapleau quit Cal State Northridge midway through a master's degree. His girlfriend had dumped him. He was smoking too much pot. He couldn't study and ended up waiting tables at a San Fernando Valley coffee shop. Two years later, his luck changed. He met his future wife, returned to school, quit drugs, became an electrician and, finally, a teacher at Lancaster High School.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life a mess, Dick Chapleau quit Cal State Northridge midway through a master's degree. His girlfriend had dumped him. He was smoking too much pot. He couldn't study and ended up waiting tables at a San Fernando Valley coffee shop. Two years later, his luck changed. He met his future wife, returned to school, quit drugs, became an electrician and, finally, a teacher at Lancaster High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life a mess, Dick Chapleau quit Cal State Northridge midway through a master's degree. His girlfriend had dumped him. He was smoking too much pot. He couldn't study and ended up as a waiter at a San Fernando Valley coffee shop. Two years later, his luck changed. He met his future wife, returned to school, quit drugs, became an electrician and, finally, a teacher at Lancaster High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1995 | BETH SHUSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His life a mess, Dick Chapleau quit Cal State Northridge midway through a master's degree. His girlfriend had dumped him. He was smoking too much pot. He couldn't study and ended up as a waiter at a San Fernando Valley coffee shop. Two years later, his luck changed. He met his future wife, returned to school, quit drugs, became an electrician and, finally, a teacher at Lancaster High School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After dropping out of college, Dick Chapleau drifted from job to job, waiting tables, punching a clock in a department store, desperately fearing that he had wasted his prospects. It was almost by accident that the 39-year-old Lancaster man fell into teaching. From the start, the guitar-playing, doggerel-spouting teacher knew that he had found a career, calling the classroom job "my one and only experience with love at first sight." Now, others are saying it shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Palmdale High School science teacher has been named a California Teacher of the Year for 1995, one of only two in Los Angeles County and five statewide to receive the distinction. Richard Chapleau, an enthusiastic man with just five years experience in public education, said the award was unexpected, to say the least. "Surprised is a remarkably understated term. I'm overwhelmed. I feel like Cinderella," said Chapleau, 39, who teaches in the Antelope Valley Union High School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2000
Each year, high school students who lead their classes in the San Fernando, Santa Clarita and Antelope valleys are honored as valedictorians. A variety of criteria are used to choose the students, but basically, they are the best and brightest at their schools. Several of them share their thoughts as they embark on their journeys into adulthood. Melissa Hwang, Chatsworth School: Bishop Alemany High GPA: 4.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 29, 1995 | PETER ROBERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Roberson is a Washington-based reporter for States News Service
Richard Chapleau, 40, became a high school teacher only six years ago, after waiting tables and an assortment of odd jobs. Nothing that Chapleau, who now teaches chemistry at Palmdale High School, did during his pre-teacher years made him a likely candidate to be honored in the White House Rose Garden. But on Friday, he was there as California's Teacher of the Year, honored with his counterparts from around the country by President Clinton and Education Secretary Richard Riley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After dropping out of college, Dick Chapleau drifted from job to job, waiting tables, punching a clock in a department store, desperately fearing that he had wasted his prospects. It was almost by accident that the 39-year-old Lancaster man fell into teaching. From the start, the guitar-playing, doggerel-spouting teacher knew that he had found a career, calling the classroom job "my one and only experience with love at first sight." Now, others are saying it shows.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 1994 | DOUGLAS ALGER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A Palmdale High School science teacher has been named a California Teacher of the Year for 1995, one of only two in Los Angeles County and five statewide to receive the distinction. Richard Chapleau, an enthusiastic man with just five years experience in public education, said the award was unexpected, to say the least. "Surprised is a remarkably understated term. I'm overwhelmed. I feel like Cinderella," said Chapleau, 39, who teaches in the Antelope Valley Union High School District.
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