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Richard Choi

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Choi, a Los Angeles radio journalist arrested Dec. 19 in South Korea, was released Wednesday from a Seoul jail but still faces criminal charges that he violated a Korean law prohibiting certain business news stories. Choi, 49, a popular news anchor and talk show host for radio station KBLA-AM (1580), better known as Radio Korea, was set free at midnight Wednesday local time. He was released on his own recognizance. Korean authorities retained his U.S. passport.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Los Angeles radio journalist Richard Choi went to Seoul in December to cover the South Korean presidential election, he planned on staying no more than a week. Two months later, after his arrest and conviction for slander--and the international controversy surrounding it--Choi returned home Friday, weary from his unforeseen extended stay. The popular Radio Korea talk show host was jailed Dec. 19 after he broadcast a story about the rumored financial problems of a rival media company.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles radio journalist Richard Choi, who was arrested in South Korea after broadcasting a report about the financial troubles of a South Korean company, was found guilty of slander Tuesday in a Seoul court and fined $1,800. "This has been unreal," Choi, 49, said in a telephone interview from Seoul. "Can you imagine this? I'm just a reporter doing a story and they arrested me and put me in jail. I'm very, very angry." He said he may appeal the verdict.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles radio journalist Richard Choi, who was arrested in South Korea after broadcasting a report about the financial troubles of a South Korean company, was found guilty of slander Tuesday in a Seoul court and fined $1,800. "This has been unreal," Choi, 49, said in a telephone interview from Seoul. "Can you imagine this? I'm just a reporter doing a story and they arrested me and put me in jail. I'm very, very angry." He said he may appeal the verdict.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare show of solidarity, Korean American and African American leaders in Los Angeles called Monday for the release of Richard Choi, a local journalist arrested in South Korea on Dec. 19. Choi, a popular news anchor and talk show host for Radio Korea, was arrested at his Seoul hotel and charged with malicious slander, days after broadcasting a story to Los Angeles about a reported business merger.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korea Times, whose suit against Los Angeles journalist Richard Choi led to his recent arrest in Seoul, said Choi intentionally broadcast a radio story that "caused irreparable damage" to the newspaper's parent company. Choi, a news anchor for Radio Korea, KBLA-AM (1580), was arrested Dec. 19 after he broadcast a story to Los Angeles about how South Korean media companies have been hurt by that country's recent economic crisis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Los Angeles radio journalist Richard Choi went to Seoul in December to cover the South Korean presidential election, he planned on staying no more than a week. Two months later, after his arrest and conviction for slander--and the international controversy surrounding it--Choi returned home Friday, weary from his unforeseen extended stay. The popular Radio Korea talk show host was jailed Dec. 19 after he broadcast a story about the rumored financial problems of a rival media company.
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
I turned on the Dodger radio broadcast before Wednesday night's game against the San Francisco Giants in time to hear the announcer talk about Chan Ho Park, but I confess I didn't understand a word he said. It wasn't Vin Scully. It was Richard Choi. He's the color announcer for the 35 Dodger games that KBLA 1580, also known as Radio Korea, is broadcasting to Southern California this season.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1998
A candlelight vigil scheduled tonight to pressure the Korean Government to release imprisoned journalist Richard Choi may not occur because the Los Angeles resident could be freed before the event begins, a Korean government spokesman said. Choi, a talk show host based in Los Angeles, was arrested Dec. 19, four days after he reported rumors that Hyundai Motor Co. and a multimedia giant were about to merge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 1998
A candlelight vigil designed to pressure the Korean government to release imprisoned journalist Richard Choi was held Tuesday night after the Los Angeles-based reporter was not set free as many in the Korean community had hoped. Choi, a radio talk show host based in Los Angeles, was arrested Dec. 19, four days after he reported rumors that Hyundai Motor Co. and multimedia giant Korea Times were about to merge.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1998 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Choi, a Los Angeles radio journalist arrested Dec. 19 in South Korea, was released Wednesday from a Seoul jail but still faces criminal charges that he violated a Korean law prohibiting certain business news stories. Choi, 49, a popular news anchor and talk show host for radio station KBLA-AM (1580), better known as Radio Korea, was set free at midnight Wednesday local time. He was released on his own recognizance. Korean authorities retained his U.S. passport.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 1, 1998 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Korea Times, whose suit against Los Angeles journalist Richard Choi led to his recent arrest in Seoul, said Choi intentionally broadcast a radio story that "caused irreparable damage" to the newspaper's parent company. Choi, a news anchor for Radio Korea, KBLA-AM (1580), was arrested Dec. 19 after he broadcast a story to Los Angeles about how South Korean media companies have been hurt by that country's recent economic crisis.
NEWS
December 30, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a rare show of solidarity, Korean American and African American leaders in Los Angeles called Monday for the release of Richard Choi, a local journalist arrested in South Korea on Dec. 19. Choi, a popular news anchor and talk show host for Radio Korea, was arrested at his Seoul hotel and charged with malicious slander, days after broadcasting a story to Los Angeles about a reported business merger.
SPORTS
September 18, 1997 | RANDY HARVEY
I turned on the Dodger radio broadcast before Wednesday night's game against the San Francisco Giants in time to hear the announcer talk about Chan Ho Park, but I confess I didn't understand a word he said. It wasn't Vin Scully. It was Richard Choi. He's the color announcer for the 35 Dodger games that KBLA 1580, also known as Radio Korea, is broadcasting to Southern California this season.
OPINION
January 8, 2005
It is with profound sadness that I read of the passing (Jan. 3) of Rep. Robert T. Matsui (D-Sacramento). Our country has lost a great leader, and the Asian Pacific Islander community in particular will miss him dearly. Matsui inspired us in many ways, especially in the area of public service, where his vision of good, honest and responsible government was simply every citizen receiving fair treatment. Be it a senior citizen living on limited income whose Social Security was the last straw of relief, or those aging internees whose only sin during World War II was being born of particular ethnicity, Rep. Matsui was damned indignant over unfair treatment of any Americans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2008 | H.G. Reza, Times Staff Writer
On New Year's Eve, La Habra police shot and killed Michael Cho in a strip mall parking lot when he allegedly threatened officers with a tire iron. The killing of the UCLA graduate and artist has set off criticism of police not heard in Southern California's Korean American community since the 1992 Los Angeles riots, when shop owners complained that officers never showed up to stop looters, and they picked up guns to defend their stores.
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