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Richard Curtis

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1997 | Steve Hochman
Rowan Atkinson's bumbling Mr. Bean character didn't just fall from a tree--well, he probably has a few times, but his antics in the "Bean" film (opening in the U.S. on Nov. 7) are indeed scripted. London writer Richard Curtis, 40, has matched wits with Atkinson for the British "Mr. Bean" and "Black Adder" TV series and earned an Oscar nomination for his "Four Weddings and a Funeral" screenplay. FUNNY BUSINESS: "People talk about the dumbing down of comedy, where everything gets more stupid.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Michael Phillips
And now for a wildly improbable romantic comedy recommendation. Already a hit in its native England, "About Time" presents all sorts of small- and medium-sized problems threatening to upset writer-director Richard Curtis' film from within, beginning with the premise (Only men in this family can time travel? Are the women at least allowed to vote?) and including the clanking interpolation of near-death experiences designed to make us care. The charm of the script comes in three fabrics: genuine, artificial and what you might call a cotton/poly blend.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
Richard Curtis: saint or sinner? Richard Curtis: savior of modern romantic comedy or dispenser of treacly, farfetched fantasy? Richard Curtis: the best thing to hit the British film industry in decades? Or one who panders to American tastes? Bet you didn't realize there was such a hot debate. In truth, there isn't unless you live in Britain. Here, the arguments about Curtis' virtues and weaknesses have exercised the minds of London's chattering classes for the last few weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Richard Curtis is indisputably one of the good ones. A British screenwriter who helped give the world the comic genius of "Black Adder" and delivered a string of smart rom-com hits including "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Bridget Jones's Diary" and "Love Actually" while writing for television shows as varied as "Mr. Bean," "The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" and "Dr. Who," Curtis is also a founding member of Comic Relief, which, since 1985, has...
ENTERTAINMENT
April 20, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Richard Curtis is indisputably one of the good ones. A British screenwriter who helped give the world the comic genius of "Black Adder" and delivered a string of smart rom-com hits including "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Bridget Jones's Diary" and "Love Actually" while writing for television shows as varied as "Mr. Bean," "The No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency" and "Dr. Who," Curtis is also a founding member of Comic Relief, which, since 1985, has...
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Girl in the Cafe" (premiering Saturday on HBO) is a somewhat schizophrenic, mostly satisfying romantic comedy from Richard Curtis, the author of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love Actually" (and also the director of the last).
OPINION
June 15, 2005
Romantic comedies are not known for conveying powerful humanitarian messages, but that might all change once the Hollywood community sees "The Girl in the Cafe," the latest offering from writer-director Richard Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Given its status as an elaborate holiday confection, it's simplest to think of "Love Actually" as a box of fine chocolates filled with a variety of centers. All are tasty, no small thing, but some are tastier than others. And while some quickly become cherished favorites, others make you wonder: "What were they thinking with that one?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2013 | By Michael Phillips
And now for a wildly improbable romantic comedy recommendation. Already a hit in its native England, "About Time" presents all sorts of small- and medium-sized problems threatening to upset writer-director Richard Curtis' film from within, beginning with the premise (Only men in this family can time travel? Are the women at least allowed to vote?) and including the clanking interpolation of near-death experiences designed to make us care. The charm of the script comes in three fabrics: genuine, artificial and what you might call a cotton/poly blend.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Toronto As the author of a series of wildly successful British film comedies and sitcoms, including "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Bean," "Notting Hill" and "Bridget Jones's Diary," you'd imagine Richard Curtis might've conquered his fear of failure by now.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 2005 | Robert Lloyd, Times Staff Writer
"The Girl in the Cafe" (premiering Saturday on HBO) is a somewhat schizophrenic, mostly satisfying romantic comedy from Richard Curtis, the author of "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Notting Hill" and "Love Actually" (and also the director of the last).
OPINION
June 15, 2005
Romantic comedies are not known for conveying powerful humanitarian messages, but that might all change once the Hollywood community sees "The Girl in the Cafe," the latest offering from writer-director Richard Curtis.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2005 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
There is no short supply, whether in Los Angeles or London, of filmmakers and actors, playwrights and theatricals who harbor serious political beliefs. Where most have faltered, or not bothered to try at all, is in using their art (and their commerce) in service of their civics. This is why chat show hosts lambaste actors who speak out on elections or global goings-on: The disconnect between the sitcom or the horror flick and global statesmanship is clearly mockable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
Richard Curtis: saint or sinner? Richard Curtis: savior of modern romantic comedy or dispenser of treacly, farfetched fantasy? Richard Curtis: the best thing to hit the British film industry in decades? Or one who panders to American tastes? Bet you didn't realize there was such a hot debate. In truth, there isn't unless you live in Britain. Here, the arguments about Curtis' virtues and weaknesses have exercised the minds of London's chattering classes for the last few weeks.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 7, 2003 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Given its status as an elaborate holiday confection, it's simplest to think of "Love Actually" as a box of fine chocolates filled with a variety of centers. All are tasty, no small thing, but some are tastier than others. And while some quickly become cherished favorites, others make you wonder: "What were they thinking with that one?"
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2003 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
"The bad granddad of rock 'n' roll? Yeah, that's me, I guess," Bill Nighy says, laughing at the thought of his late-blooming screen persona. In Richard Curtis' romantic comedy "Love Actually," Nighy's Billy Mack -- a devil-may-care, foulmouthed aging British rock star -- is given the "bad granddad" moniker by a DJ. He has recorded and is promoting a loathsome (to him) version of the 1960s hit "Love Is All Around," with lyrics altered for Christmas. (The film opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2003 | Steven Rosen, Special to The Times
"The bad granddad of rock 'n' roll? Yeah, that's me, I guess," Bill Nighy says, laughing at the thought of his late-blooming screen persona. In Richard Curtis' romantic comedy "Love Actually," Nighy's Billy Mack -- a devil-may-care, foulmouthed aging British rock star -- is given the "bad granddad" moniker by a DJ. He has recorded and is promoting a loathsome (to him) version of the 1960s hit "Love Is All Around," with lyrics altered for Christmas. (The film opens Friday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2005 | Choire Sicha, Special to The Times
There is no short supply, whether in Los Angeles or London, of filmmakers and actors, playwrights and theatricals who harbor serious political beliefs. Where most have faltered, or not bothered to try at all, is in using their art (and their commerce) in service of their civics. This is why chat show hosts lambaste actors who speak out on elections or global goings-on: The disconnect between the sitcom or the horror flick and global statesmanship is clearly mockable.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2003 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Toronto As the author of a series of wildly successful British film comedies and sitcoms, including "Four Weddings and a Funeral," "Bean," "Notting Hill" and "Bridget Jones's Diary," you'd imagine Richard Curtis might've conquered his fear of failure by now.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1997 | Steve Hochman
Rowan Atkinson's bumbling Mr. Bean character didn't just fall from a tree--well, he probably has a few times, but his antics in the "Bean" film (opening in the U.S. on Nov. 7) are indeed scripted. London writer Richard Curtis, 40, has matched wits with Atkinson for the British "Mr. Bean" and "Black Adder" TV series and earned an Oscar nomination for his "Four Weddings and a Funeral" screenplay. FUNNY BUSINESS: "People talk about the dumbing down of comedy, where everything gets more stupid.
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