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Richard D Colburn

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up on a San Diego farm, Richard D. Colburn and his brothers were given two choices: doing chores or studying a musical instrument. Richard chose the latter. Had he better instruction, he could have "out-Heifetzed Heifetz," the 86-year-old businessman says, his piercing blue eyes evidencing a hint of a twinkle. Instead, Colburn went on to become the Heifetz of music patronage--one of the most generous benefactors on the Los Angeles arts scene.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before conducting the Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Sunday night, across the street from the newly renamed Colburn Way (one block of 2nd Street), the renowned British conductor Neville Marriner was handed the Richard D. Colburn Award in a small ceremony on stage. Marriner was the first music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, which Richard D. Colburn, Los Angeles' legendary music benefactor, helped bankroll. The concert was presented by the Colburn School in honor of the centenary of its founder, who died at 92 in 2004.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
A crowd of construction workers, some sporting T-shirts reading "I Built the Colburn School of Performing Arts 1997-1998," sat on the dust-filled steps of the facility's new 416-seat auditorium a month before seats--and students--were scheduled to arrive. Munching on chicken-and-pesto sandwiches provided by their hosts, they peered intently at the stage. Out walked 12-year-old Cynthia Gong, Timothy Braun, also 12, and 11-year-old Eugenia Chang, wearing hard hats of their own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Richard D. Colburn, a wealthy businessman whose own dreams of being a professional musician fueled his generous and lifelong commitment to music and music education, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 92. "He'd been very tired the last few days," said his daughter, Carol Colburn Hogel. "But, still, this was unexpected."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2004 | Claudia Luther, Times Staff Writer
Richard D. Colburn, a wealthy businessman whose own dreams of being a professional musician fueled his generous and lifelong commitment to music and music education, died Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 92. "He'd been very tired the last few days," said his daughter, Carol Colburn Hogel. "But, still, this was unexpected."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2012 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Before conducting the Colburn Orchestra at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Sunday night, across the street from the newly renamed Colburn Way (one block of 2nd Street), the renowned British conductor Neville Marriner was handed the Richard D. Colburn Award in a small ceremony on stage. Marriner was the first music director of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra, which Richard D. Colburn, Los Angeles' legendary music benefactor, helped bankroll. The concert was presented by the Colburn School in honor of the centenary of its founder, who died at 92 in 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
As announced Wednesday, the Community School of Performing Arts--a conservatory for pre-college age students--will henceforth be named the R.D. Colburn School of Performing Arts, honoring arts patron Richard D. Colburn. Colburn, 77, a businessman and amateur violist, was one of the founders of the Los Angeles Chamber Orchestra (and president of its board, 1979-81), and now serves on the board of directors of the Los Angeles Philharmonic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 27, 2003 | From a Times Staff Writer
Tara Glynn Colburn, major benefactor and founding board member of the Los Angeles Opera at its inception in 1986, has died at the age of 61. Colburn died Friday of cancer in Geneva, Los Angeles Opera officials said. As a part of her philanthropy, Colburn underwrote the recent production of "The Barber of Seville" at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion and was a co-sponsor of the production of "Madama Butterfly" planned for next season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 1998
Racist architecture? Students ogling pedestrians from a balcony? A self-conscious parody of nearby MOCA? Is this a review of the beautiful new Colburn School for Performing Arts or the poison-pen ramblings of a jealous architect ("Just Off-Key," by Nicolai Ouroussoff, Oct. 5). I worked on Bunker Hill for more than 10 years, and I've toured the new Colburn School. It does more to bring life to Grand Avenue than any other structure. The school brings a large, culturally diverse student body to an area that heretofore has been relegated to bankers, consultants, lawyers, and accountants by day and the cultural elite by night.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 30, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One month before the Colburn School of Performing Arts is scheduled to move from a 7,000-square-foot former warehouse near USC into its new $25-million, 55,000-square-foot Bunker Hill home, discussion of even more dramatic expansion is underway. The institution, which provides afternoon and weekend music education to students ranging in age from 2 1/2 to 18, is making plans to create a tuition-free college-level conservatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1998 | Elaine Dutka, Elaine Dutka is a Times staff writer
A crowd of construction workers, some sporting T-shirts reading "I Built the Colburn School of Performing Arts 1997-1998," sat on the dust-filled steps of the facility's new 416-seat auditorium a month before seats--and students--were scheduled to arrive. Munching on chicken-and-pesto sandwiches provided by their hosts, they peered intently at the stage. Out walked 12-year-old Cynthia Gong, Timothy Braun, also 12, and 11-year-old Eugenia Chang, wearing hard hats of their own.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 1998 | ELAINE DUTKA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Growing up on a San Diego farm, Richard D. Colburn and his brothers were given two choices: doing chores or studying a musical instrument. Richard chose the latter. Had he better instruction, he could have "out-Heifetzed Heifetz," the 86-year-old businessman says, his piercing blue eyes evidencing a hint of a twinkle. Instead, Colburn went on to become the Heifetz of music patronage--one of the most generous benefactors on the Los Angeles arts scene.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1998 | Daniel Cariaga, Daniel Cariaga is The Times' music writer
It started as a practical solution to an academic problem, but it has become an opportunity to honor one of the important musical icons of our century. In forming a scholarship fund for pianists at Cal State Fullerton, where he teaches, Eduardo Delgado, the Argentine-born mid-career pianist, decided to name the effort after the legendary Alicia de Larrocha.
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