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Richard D Heffner

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | SEAN MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 22 years, the Motion Picture Assn. of America has weathered assaults leveled by filmmakers and critics against its movie ratings system. Today, the MPAA will meet one of its opponents face-to-face in a New York courtroom in a case that could determine the fate of the controversial adults-only X rating. Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler will appear before New York Supreme Court Judge Charles Ramos to argue that in assigning Pedro Almodovar's "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 21, 1990 | SEAN MITCHELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For 22 years, the Motion Picture Assn. of America has weathered assaults leveled by filmmakers and critics against its movie ratings system. Today, the MPAA will meet one of its opponents face-to-face in a New York courtroom in a case that could determine the fate of the controversial adults-only X rating. Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler will appear before New York Supreme Court Judge Charles Ramos to argue that in assigning Pedro Almodovar's "Tie Me Up! Tie Me Down!"
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BUSINESS
July 9, 1990
Richard D. Heffner makes an important point in his July 2 Counterpunch commentary ("Guidance to Parents, Not Profits, Governs Movie Rating System"): It will not work to have two ratings symbols that signify "adults only." How could Heffner's Code and Ratings Administration presume to decide that some "adults only" material is art and some porno? This would only create nightmarish legal problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1987 | Bill Steigerwald
Outtakes may dish the dirt at times--but do we deserve an X rating? No way. We're 99 and 44/100ths percent pure PG. In case anyone's confused, that was the new movie titled "Outtakes" (no relation, though it boasts that it's "raucous, raunchy and offends everybody") that just lost its appeal to the MPAA for an R rating instead of its original X.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 9, 1991 | DAVID J. FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The appeals board of the movie industry's Classification & Ratings Administration refused Friday to lift an adults-only, NC-17 rating for director Ken Russell's "Whore," his upcoming movie about prostitution. The distributor, Los Angeles-based Trimark Pictures, which had filed an appeal last week, said "Whore" is an unglamorous, realistic depiction of the world's oldest profession. Trimark officials said young people should see it as a lesson in the realities of street life.
BOOKS
August 4, 1985 | ALEX RAKSIN
A Documentary History of the United States, Richard D. Heffner (NAL). Politics in paperback, from Tom Paine's "Common Sense" to President Reagan's version of it in 1981 and 1985. In this fourth (and first paperback) edition of a 1952 work, Heffner leaves the polemics to America's most prominent orators, adding only short historical notes before each section. The result is a concise yet comprehensive glimpse into the rhetoric and reason that have shaped this nation.
NEWS
July 6, 1986 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
What is this thing called liberty? Overshadowed by the jets streaking through the sky, the ships streaming down the river, the fireworks exploding in midair and the entertainers cavorting on midstage, a group called the Liberty Conference holed up in the conference room of a midtown hotel this sunny holiday weekend to confront that very issue. Adding "cerebration to celebration," as Chairman Richard D.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 1990 | ROBERT RADNITZ, Radnitz is the producer of the feature films "Sounder," which received five Academy Award nominations, and "Cross Creek," which received four, and the TV movie "Mary White," winner of an Emmy Award. and
Since its inception, I have fought against the rating system. I have felt it to be a ploy to ward off federal legislation, but in point of fact, I believe it has brought the motion picture industry closer to federal regulation than it ever was. Personally, I have nothing against sex or violence in any film for anyone--provided that it not be gratuitous. When it is, it should be castigated for what it is--bad filmmaking. I believe in the American people's ability to discern for themselves.
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