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Richard Davey

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SPORTS
September 9, 1988
Richard Davey, a 23-year-old Briton, broke the record for swimming the English Channel from France to England, making the crossing in 8 hours 5 minutes. The old record of 8:15 was set last year by New Zealand's Philip Rush.
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SPORTS
September 9, 1988
Richard Davey, a 23-year-old Briton, broke the record for swimming the English Channel from France to England, making the crossing in 8 hours 5 minutes. The old record of 8:15 was set last year by New Zealand's Philip Rush.
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OPINION
February 2, 2002
"Olympics Scrambles to Bridge Generation Gap" (Jan. 27) was no surprise to me. I am 31 years old, and my interest in the Olympic Games has been lacking for the past 10 years, but not for the reasons you listed. I am frustrated every time I turn on the TV during the Olympics to be treated to figure skating or gymnastics. There are other sports and, believe it or not, people want to see them. Most young people today do not relate to the drama and competition of the Olympics because they are not able to see much of the competition.
NEWS
May 15, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A daring experiment--having AIDS patients stop taking their powerful drugs in the hope that their bodies could control the virus without them--has produced disappointing results: The virus comes back. Researchers were not surprised. Even in patients such as these, where potent drug combinations had rendered the human immunodeficiency virus undetectable by the most sophisticated testing, scientists already knew that there were hidden reservoirs of latent HIV in the body.
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | ANNE C. ROARK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The supplies of blood available for medical transfusions in the United States, Canada, Australia, Japan and most of Western Europe are extremely safe, thanks to increasingly sophisticated screening for AIDS, hepatitis and other contagious diseases. Such screening, however, continues to be largely unavailable in Africa, China, the Soviet Union and much of Eastern Europe and the Middle East, resulting in blood supplies contaminated with disease.
HEALTH
September 13, 1999 | JANE E. ALLEN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Imagine that your daughter is about to have her tonsils removed. Everything's arranged, right down to your family leave and her school makeup tests, but then the hospital calls and says all elective surgery is being postponed because there isn't enough blood if an emergency transfusion is needed. Fiction? Or prediction?
NEWS
July 8, 2000 | THOMAS H. MAUGH II, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
The numbers of AIDS deaths and new HIV infections in the United States have remained stable for the second year in a row, public health authorities will announce today. But increases in risky behaviors and growing infection rates among the young are setting the stage for a resurgence of the disease, officials cautioned. An estimated 16,000 Americans died of AIDS last year and 40,000 became HIV-positive, according to the newest figures compiled by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
NEWS
January 31, 1999 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At precisely 11 p.m. on Jan. 5, Mark Deal, a 37-year-old legal researcher and AIDS patient who lives in New Orleans, ushered in the Feast of the Epiphany by swallowing the last of the 25 daily pills that had been keeping him alive and thriving. Deal did it for the good of science and because he believes he already has beaten the odds. "I'm beyond scared," he said. "I should have been dead years ago."
SPORTS
February 15, 1991 | LARRY STEWART
A little less than a year ago, Bill Walton lost the use of his ankles. On March 15, 1990, in the third major operation on his painful ankles in three years, the bones were fused. That means the ankles no longer flex. Walton's feet are locked in position. But after six months on crutches, the intense pain he had for years is gone. "I'm the luckiest man alive," said Walton, who no longer needs the crutches. "I can walk, ride a bicycle and go to sleep pain-free.
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