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Richard Dawkins

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SCIENCE
November 30, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Richard Dawkins was enjoying a coffee at the Mondrian Hotel when a star-struck waiter interrupted him to thank him for his work. It was the kind of thing that happens a lot at the swanky West Hollywood hot spot - but usually to showbiz celebrities, not biologists. Dawkins is used to the adulation. The British intellectual has become a celebrity thanks to his books on evolution - including "The Selfish Gene," written in 1976 - and his vocal atheism, expressed in works like "The God Delusion," published in 2006.
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SCIENCE
November 30, 2013 | By Eryn Brown
Richard Dawkins was enjoying a coffee at the Mondrian Hotel when a star-struck waiter interrupted him to thank him for his work. It was the kind of thing that happens a lot at the swanky West Hollywood hot spot - but usually to showbiz celebrities, not biologists. Dawkins is used to the adulation. The British intellectual has become a celebrity thanks to his books on evolution - including "The Selfish Gene," written in 1976 - and his vocal atheism, expressed in works like "The God Delusion," published in 2006.
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WORLD
January 12, 2009 | Henry Chu
All they are saying is give atheism a chance. This month 800 buses rolled out of depots across Britain plastered with advertisements cheerfully informing people that "there's probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life." Sponsored by the British Humanist Assn., the campaign is the brainchild of a comedian who had seen Christian messages on buses, looked up the websites of the organizations behind them and found warnings that, as a nonbeliever, she was destined to go to hell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 2011 | By Mitchell Landsberg, Los Angeles Times
As a prosecutor, Vincent Bugliosi put Charles Manson behind bars. As an author, he outlined legal cases against O.J. Simpson, Lee Harvey Oswald and George W. Bush. It turns out that Bugliosi was just warming up. Now the author of "Helter Skelter: The True Story of the Manson Murders," has written a book that takes on God. In "Divinity of Doubt: The God Question" (Vanguard Press), the former Los Angeles County deputy district attorney has applied his ample prosecutorial skills to the ultimate mystery: Is there a God and, if so, why does He allow evil?
BOOKS
December 19, 2004 | Richard Ellis, Richard Ellis is the author of "No Turning Back: The Life and Death of Animal Species" and the forthcoming "Tiger Bone & Rhino Horn: The Destruction of Wildlife for Traditional Chinese Medicine."
With the publication of "The Selfish Gene" in 1976, biologist Richard Dawkins announced his intention of concentrating on various interpretations of evolution. A self-proclaimed philosophical descendant of Charles Darwin, Dawkins believes that DNA reveals the basic blueprint for life on Earth, without benefit of a designer, intelligent or otherwise. He is a vocal opponent of the idea that evolution was designed to produce us.
NEWS
March 17, 1995 | LEE DEMBART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Many scientists eventually become dewy-eyed about the beauty of the universe and nature's laws. Awe and wonder lead them to metaphysical speculations about how and why everything has come about. No less a scientist than Albert Einstein said, "The most beautiful and the most profound emotion one can experience is the sensation of the mystical. It is the source of all true science." He was not alone. For many, the discoveries of science lead to the question, "Why does the universe exist?"
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Richard Dawkins, best known as the author of "The Selfish Gene" (1976) and "The God Delusion" (2006), is at the Atheist Alliance International Convention in Burbank to discuss his new book, "The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution" (Free Press: 470 pp., $30), but he can't get from one banquet hall to the next without someone asking to take a picture with him. Modest and professorial, Dawkins is mobbed, celebrity-style, no matter which audience he tells there is no God. As for Mother Nature, he adds, she doesn't care either -- natural selection is not a good-natured process, but one that favors mutant efforts to get ahead.
OPINION
January 8, 2007
Re "Vandalizing Hussein," Opinion, Jan. 4 Richard Dawkins wonders how "evil monsters could secure sufficient support to take over an entire country," and predictably he uses Adolf Hitler as his model. He ignores such tyrants as Josef Stalin, Mao Tse-tung, Pol Pot and others who caused 100 million deaths in pursuit of what they called equality and social justice. Contributing to their success in taking over entire countries were members of the international leftist community who were convinced by their words.
OPINION
January 19, 2009
Re "Spreading the atheist word," Jan. 12 It's refreshing that Richard Dawkins meets many atheists or intellectuals on his book tours and believes America's religiosity or intellectual dwarfism is exaggerated. I disagree. It would seem that dangerous religious superstitions would decline worldwide as greater scientific knowledge is gained. In fact, religious nonsense is declining in all industrialized nations except this one. Richard Feldman Pomona -- The interview raises a significant issue regarding Dawkins and his kin: Does science per se logically lead to atheism?
SCIENCE
October 22, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
On the cover of his new book, Francisco Ayala is sticking a banana on a fork and asking: Am I a monkey? He asks five other straightforward questions about evolution ? laying out for the general public the most commonly discussed topics surrounding how human life came to be. Though the title might seem funny ? "Am I a Monkey? Six Big Questions about Evolution" ( Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010) ? the book is serious. Among other things, Ayala tackles the tension between religion and science, taking a softer position than some other scientists, notably British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins.
SCIENCE
October 22, 2010 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times
On the cover of his new book, Francisco Ayala is sticking a banana on a fork and asking: Am I a monkey? He asks five other straightforward questions about evolution ? laying out for the general public the most commonly discussed topics surrounding how human life came to be. Though the title might seem funny ? "Am I a Monkey? Six Big Questions about Evolution" ( Johns Hopkins University Press, 2010) ? the book is serious. Among other things, Ayala tackles the tension between religion and science, taking a softer position than some other scientists, notably British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins.
NEWS
November 4, 2009 | By Lori Kozlowski, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
In the 150 years since the publication of Charles Darwin's landmark book, "On the Origin of Species," researchers have accrued massive amounts of evidence in support of evolution and the mechanics behind the process. Yet today only 4 in 10 Americans believe that evolution occurred. British evolutionary biologist Richard Dawkins, an eminent scholar and outspoken atheist, has for decades written best-selling books on evolutionary processes and has repeatedly called for rational public thinking on the matter.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds, Salter Reynolds is a Times staff writer.
Richard Dawkins, best known as the author of "The Selfish Gene" (1976) and "The God Delusion" (2006), is at the Atheist Alliance International Convention in Burbank to discuss his new book, "The Greatest Show on Earth: The Evidence for Evolution" (Free Press: 470 pp., $30), but he can't get from one banquet hall to the next without someone asking to take a picture with him. Modest and professorial, Dawkins is mobbed, celebrity-style, no matter which audience he tells there is no God. As for Mother Nature, he adds, she doesn't care either -- natural selection is not a good-natured process, but one that favors mutant efforts to get ahead.
OPINION
August 14, 2009
Re "A holy war?" Opinion, Aug. 11 As a long- standing member of the National Center for Science Education, I cannot begin to tell you how much harm Richard Dawkins and his fellow neo-reductionists have caused our efforts. Perhaps he has some secret agenda to "draw fire" from the creationists that is normally directed against biology teachers. If so, he is naive to a fault. The wall of fear and ignorance shielding the 46% of U.S. citizens cited in this article from modern science is merely stiffened by Dawkins' attacks.
OPINION
January 19, 2009
Re "Spreading the atheist word," Jan. 12 It's refreshing that Richard Dawkins meets many atheists or intellectuals on his book tours and believes America's religiosity or intellectual dwarfism is exaggerated. I disagree. It would seem that dangerous religious superstitions would decline worldwide as greater scientific knowledge is gained. In fact, religious nonsense is declining in all industrialized nations except this one. Richard Feldman Pomona -- The interview raises a significant issue regarding Dawkins and his kin: Does science per se logically lead to atheism?
WORLD
January 12, 2009 | Henry Chu
All they are saying is give atheism a chance. This month 800 buses rolled out of depots across Britain plastered with advertisements cheerfully informing people that "there's probably no God. Now stop worrying and enjoy your life." Sponsored by the British Humanist Assn., the campaign is the brainchild of a comedian who had seen Christian messages on buses, looked up the websites of the organizations behind them and found warnings that, as a nonbeliever, she was destined to go to hell.
OPINION
April 22, 2008
Re "Gods and earthlings," Opinion, April 18 Atheism has its fundamentalists like Richard Dawkins. Everyone has faith in something that is beyond science to prove. Science itself is based on the assumption that the universe is rational and logical and not absurd. Dawkins has a similar problem to those who cannot explain where a complex God came from. Where did the Big Bang come from, and what existed before? If the anthropic principle (the laws of nature seem to have been crafted for the emergence and sustenance of life)
OPINION
April 22, 2008
Re "Gods and earthlings," Opinion, April 18 Atheism has its fundamentalists like Richard Dawkins. Everyone has faith in something that is beyond science to prove. Science itself is based on the assumption that the universe is rational and logical and not absurd. Dawkins has a similar problem to those who cannot explain where a complex God came from. Where did the Big Bang come from, and what existed before? If the anthropic principle (the laws of nature seem to have been crafted for the emergence and sustenance of life)
OPINION
January 8, 2007
Re "Vandalizing Hussein," Opinion, Jan. 4 Richard Dawkins wonders how "evil monsters could secure sufficient support to take over an entire country," and predictably he uses Adolf Hitler as his model. He ignores such tyrants as Josef Stalin, Mao Tse-tung, Pol Pot and others who caused 100 million deaths in pursuit of what they called equality and social justice. Contributing to their success in taking over entire countries were members of the international leftist community who were convinced by their words.
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