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Richard Diebenkorn

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February 26, 2012
"Richard Diebenkorn: The Ocean Park Series" Where: Orange County Museum of Art, 850 San Clemente Drive, Newport Beach When: Through May 27. Closed Monday and Tuesday. Contact: http://www.ocma.net or (949) 759-1122
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: In chronological order, 2013 Top 10: Art American artist Charles Reiffel is probably the best early Modernist painter you've never heard of - til now http://lat.ms/1f4OtFO #Top10art Brilliant, sexy charioteer was only one great reason to see Getty's extraordinary ancient "Sicily" show http://lat.ms/1aSscqo ...
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2013 | David Colker
Somewhere in Newport Beach is a two-story warehouse with no sign on the door or any other clue as to what it holds. But inside is the core of a vast art collection that has been seen by only a few select people in the art world. It includes original works by numerous contemporary artists who are world-famous - such as Richard Diebenkorn , Robert Irwin , Helen Lundeberg , Carlos Almaraz and Edward Kienholz - as well as lesser-known figures. But the artists all have one thing in common: They all worked in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
PALM SPRINGS - A modest little painting near the entry to the exhibition "Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966" is a harbinger of things to come. Not just for the lovely and engrossing show that unfolds in the galleries at the Palm Springs Art Museum , but for Diebenkorn's greater achievement. That came after the painter left Northern California and settled in Los Angeles, where he began the peerless "Ocean Park" abstractions. "Seated Man" was painted in 1956.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
PALM SPRINGS - A modest little painting near the entry to the exhibition "Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966" is a harbinger of things to come. Not just for the lovely and engrossing show that unfolds in the galleries at the Palm Springs Art Museum , but for Diebenkorn's greater achievement. That came after the painter left Northern California and settled in Los Angeles, where he began the peerless "Ocean Park" abstractions. "Seated Man" was painted in 1956.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 2012 | By Jori Finkel, Los Angeles Times
Sometimes a change of place is much more than a change of scenery. The way Richard Diebenkorn told it, moving from the Bay Area to Southern California in the fall of 1966 was a catalyst that changed the direction of his painting. Before then, the artist was known for abandoning the mission of Abstract Expressionism and reintroducing the human figure into his work. Six or eight months after the move, and after taking over painter Sam Francis' studio a block from the beach in the Ocean Park neighborhood of Santa Monica, something broke wide open.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Maybe life really is as gentle as an old Hollywood family comedy. If it is, Richard Diebenkorn, who died Tuesday, is currently sitting on a celestial cloud reading laudatory obituaries to his life and art. He adjusts his glasses, pulls his nose and runs his hand through his dark hair. "This is lovely and well-meant," he'd think, "but so complimentary to me that, personally, I'm a bit embarrassed. All this business about my life is redundant, really.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, TIMES ART CRITIC
Richard Diebenkorn wasn't the first important modernist painter to develop in California, but he was the first of the breed to gain an enduring national reputation for his art. His death from respiratory failure Tuesday, just three weeks shy of his 71st birthday, marks a turning point.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1992 | CHRISTOPHER KNIGHT, Christopher Knight is a Times art critic
Richard Diebenkorn's "Ocean Park" paintings are immensely sad. Look into their vaporous veils of watery, layered color, and across the tracery of submerged and tremulous lines on which their loose geometry of shapes is constructed. You'll see a solitary vision of an artist sequestered in his studio, alone, trying to assemble a paradisal realm that calls forth the memory of a lost Golden Age.
NEWS
March 31, 1993 | WILLIAM WILSON and MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard Diebenkorn, arguably the most historically and aesthetically important modernist painter to come out of California, died Tuesday. He was 70. Diebenkorn, internationally known for his blending of Abstract Expressionism and American realism, died en route to a hospital in Berkeley, said Lawrence Rubin, president of New York's M. Knoedler & Co. The company had been Diebenkorn's dealer since 1975.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 2013 | David Colker
Somewhere in Newport Beach is a two-story warehouse with no sign on the door or any other clue as to what it holds. But inside is the core of a vast art collection that has been seen by only a few select people in the art world. It includes original works by numerous contemporary artists who are world-famous - such as Richard Diebenkorn , Robert Irwin , Helen Lundeberg , Carlos Almaraz and Edward Kienholz - as well as lesser-known figures. But the artists all have one thing in common: They all worked in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Richard Diebenkorn is an artist with both Northern and Southern California roots. Born in Portland, Ore., he grew up in San Francisco, and played a big role in the postwar Abstract Expressionist scene centered at the California School of Fine Arts (now the San Francisco Art Institute ) before moving to Los Angeles in 1966 to teach at UCLA. Late in his life, he moved back to Northern California, where he died in 1993 at the age of 70. His work is marked by an interplay between the abstract and the concrete; as he explained in the late 1950s, “One wants to see the artifice of the thing as well as the subject.” Two decades after his death, the intention resonates, with its sense that what is important in a work of art, any work of art, is “a feeling of strength in reserve - tension beneath the calm.” Diebenkorn is the subject of two exhibitions this fall: “Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years,” at San Francisco's de Young Museum, and “The Intimate Diebenkorn: Works on Paper,” which will open at the College of Marin Fine Arts Gallery in September before going on the road.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2013 | By Jori Finkel
The De Young Museum in San Francisco has borrowed paintings from dozens of collectors and museums to put together its Richard Diebenkorn exhibition, focusing on the late artist's years in Berkeley from 1953 to 1966. One lender is Wayne Thiebaud, the 92-year-old master of hand-painted Pop famous for his candy-colored richly textured images of pies, cakes and ice-cream treats. He loaned a Diebenkorn still life from 1955 that features a bottle and spoon against a sea of competing blues for the show, which runs through Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2013 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
For William Wilson, the former Los Angeles Times art critic who died Saturday at the age of 78, art was a childhood refuge, a teenage survival mechanism, and, finally, a career that saw him chronicle the city's rise in art-world stature from his first byline in 1965 to his retirement in 1998. "He grew up under really rotten circumstances, and was just a self-made person," said Diane Leslie, a novelist who was a close friend. Another longtime friend, artist Don Lagerberg, said Wilson died in his sleep at a Los Angeles care facility from Alzheimer's disease, which had been diagnosed about four years ago. Wilson, born July 5, 1934,  never knew his father and often talked of hard times growing up in Los Angeles with a single mother who was given to radical mood swings and who fell to her death in an apparent suicide when he was 18. Among his boyhood memories, Leslie said, was eating a great deal of canned tuna - and noticing that sometimes the can had a picture of cats on it. He often spoke of how his mother took him to the library, where he would pore over picture books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2013 | By Suzanne Muchnic, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Gifford Phillips, a gentlemanly patron of cultural institutions and passionate advocate of contemporary art who played a leading role at museums on both coasts of the United States, has died. He was 94. Phillips died Wednesday of natural causes at a hospice in Palm Desert, said his daughter Marjorie Elliott. A member of a wealthy family - including his uncle, art collector Duncan Phillips, who founded the Phillips Collection in Washington, D.C. - Gifford Phillips was a partner in Pardee Phillips, a real estate developer of residential and commercial property in California and Nevada.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 27, 2012 | By Joe Bel Bruno and Mike Boehm
Jeffrey Gundlach said Thursday that an estimated $10 million in 20th century art that was burglarized from his Santa Monica home has now been safely returned, and that police told him they have arrested two suspects. The wealthy bond trader, who's considered one of the world's most prominent investment fund managers, had posted a $1.7-million reward for the return of works by Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns, Richard Diebenkorn, Joseph Cornell and others. He had discovered Sept. 14 that they were missing, after returning from a short business trip.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 1989 | WILLIAM WILSON
Richard Diebenkorn goes quietly about the business of being Los Angeles' most renowned artist-in-residence. He is so quiet about it, in fact, that many of his admirers have failed to realize he doesn't live there anymore. Last spring he moved to rural Healdsburg in the wine country north of San Francisco. By now, all attentive admirers do know that on Thursday a retrospective of his drawings opens to the public at the L. A. County Museum of Art to remain on view through May 7.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 20, 2013 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
In this time when news is disseminated ever more quickly, we asked our critics to list the best of culture in 2013 in tweet form: In chronological order, 2013 Top 10: Art American artist Charles Reiffel is probably the best early Modernist painter you've never heard of - til now http://lat.ms/1f4OtFO #Top10art Brilliant, sexy charioteer was only one great reason to see Getty's extraordinary ancient "Sicily" show http://lat.ms/1aSscqo ...
BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By Pat Benson
Bond king Jeffrey Gundlach has offered a $1.7-million reward for the safe return of artworks stolen recently from his Santa Monica home. The stolen pieces, worth an estimated $10 million, included some of the biggest names in contemporary art: Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. What happens to art after it's stolen? Join us for a live video chat today at 4:30 p.m. with retired FBI agent Robert K. Wittman, who wrote the book "Priceless: How I Went Undercover to Rescue the World's Stolen Treasures.
BUSINESS
September 24, 2012 | By Stuart Pfeifer, Mike Boehm and Walter Hamilton, Los Angeles Times
Even by Hollywood standards, the audacious art heist from the home of a wealthy L.A. money man is an intriguing whodunit. Jeffrey Gundlach, one of the world's top bond gurus, has offered a $1.7-million bounty for the safe return of a cherished collection stolen from his Santa Monica home last week. The $10-million haul included some of the biggest names in contemporary art: Piet Mondrian, Jasper Johns and Richard Diebenkorn. On Monday, Gundlach took the unusual step of holding a news conference in downtown Los Angeles to announce one of the highest rewards on record for the return of stolen art. He set aside $1 million of the reward money for a Mondrian piece, which one art-theft expert said was the most ever offered for a single painting.
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