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Richard Dixon

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council on Tuesday night elected Richard T. Dixon to his fourth term as mayor. Dixon succeeds Kathryn McCullough, elected to the council in 1994 and passed over four times for the largely ceremonial mayor's job after critics said they did not think she was up to it. McCullough's supporters suggested racism was to blame. She won last year on a 3-2 vote.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011
The Prague Cemetery A Novel Umberto Eco, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 445 pp., $27
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2011
The Prague Cemetery A Novel Umberto Eco, translated from the Italian by Richard Dixon Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 445 pp., $27
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 6, 2001 | From Times Staff Reports
The City Council on Tuesday night elected Richard T. Dixon to his fourth term as mayor. Dixon succeeds Kathryn McCullough, elected to the council in 1994 and passed over four times for the largely ceremonial mayor's job after critics said they did not think she was up to it. McCullough's supporters suggested racism was to blame. She won last year on a 3-2 vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
Gloria Molina began slicing up Los Angeles County Administrative Officer Richard Dixon at Tuesday's supervisorial meeting about an hour before lunch. At first, the newest Los Angeles County supervisor used her knife on the veteran chief fiscal officer in a deceptively slow manner, poking around, deciding where to cut, as if she were preparing to carve the Thanksgiving turkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon has proposed raising at least $29.2 million in new utility and business taxes in Los Angeles County's unincorporated areas, officials said Monday. County officials, who are grappling with an unprecedented $588-million budget shortfall, also have recommended closing as many as 12 public libraries and cutting back services at all 92 county-operated libraries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
Your editorial of July 18 supports an expansion of the Board of Supervisors from five to seven or nine members and also supports replacing the CAO with an elected county executive. You are absolutely wrong when you argue that these changes will help to improve county government. Comparatively speaking, county government is far more efficient in addressing the needs of our citizens than the city of Los Angeles, the state of California and the federal government. You may not like the fact that the Board of Supervisors has both legislative and executive powers or that the board has chosen to operate the county through its CAO more like a large corporation than the sprawling unresponsive bureaucracies typical of big government.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles County government struggles financially, the county's chief fiscal custodian has maintained an open-ended expense account for himself and the Board of Supervisors--and last year they spent $117,000 on everything from fresh fruit and flowers to gourmet meals. The taxpayer-funded checking account controlled by Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon was set up to pay for incidental expenses.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He has more authority to award contracts than Gov. Pete Wilson. He can rearrange department budgets at will, something Mayor Tom Bradley cannot. Although he is not elected, the public pays for his perquisites, such as a bulletproof car with a sheriff's deputy as chauffeur, plus an open-ended expense account for himself and other top county officials that amounted to $117,000 last year. Chief Administrative Officer Richard B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard B. Dixon, forced out as Los Angeles County's chief administrator in part because of his approval of pension increases for himself and other top officials, has been quietly hired as a $200-an-hour adviser to the county retirement board. Charles Conrad, administrator of the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Assn., said in an interview Tuesday that he hired Dixon as an adviser on the sale of bonds to pay off the county's nearly $2-billion liability to the pension system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 1992 | HECTOR TOBAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chief Administrative Officer Richard Dixon has proposed raising at least $29.2 million in new utility and business taxes in Los Angeles County's unincorporated areas, officials said Monday. County officials, who are grappling with an unprecedented $588-million budget shortfall, also have recommended closing as many as 12 public libraries and cutting back services at all 92 county-operated libraries.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992
Your editorial of July 18 supports an expansion of the Board of Supervisors from five to seven or nine members and also supports replacing the CAO with an elected county executive. You are absolutely wrong when you argue that these changes will help to improve county government. Comparatively speaking, county government is far more efficient in addressing the needs of our citizens than the city of Los Angeles, the state of California and the federal government. You may not like the fact that the Board of Supervisors has both legislative and executive powers or that the board has chosen to operate the county through its CAO more like a large corporation than the sprawling unresponsive bureaucracies typical of big government.
NEWS
February 2, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
He has more authority to award contracts than Gov. Pete Wilson. He can rearrange department budgets at will, something Mayor Tom Bradley cannot. Although he is not elected, the public pays for his perquisites, such as a bulletproof car with a sheriff's deputy as chauffeur, plus an open-ended expense account for himself and other top county officials that amounted to $117,000 last year. Chief Administrative Officer Richard B.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 1992 | RICHARD SIMON and FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
As Los Angeles County government struggles financially, the county's chief fiscal custodian has maintained an open-ended expense account for himself and the Board of Supervisors--and last year they spent $117,000 on everything from fresh fruit and flowers to gourmet meals. The taxpayer-funded checking account controlled by Chief Administrative Officer Richard B. Dixon was set up to pay for incidental expenses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 1991 | BILL BOYARSKY
Gloria Molina began slicing up Los Angeles County Administrative Officer Richard Dixon at Tuesday's supervisorial meeting about an hour before lunch. At first, the newest Los Angeles County supervisor used her knife on the veteran chief fiscal officer in a deceptively slow manner, poking around, deciding where to cut, as if she were preparing to carve the Thanksgiving turkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 29, 1993 | RICHARD SIMON and CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard B. Dixon, forced out as Los Angeles County's chief administrator in part because of his approval of pension increases for himself and other top officials, has been quietly hired as a $200-an-hour adviser to the county retirement board. Charles Conrad, administrator of the Los Angeles County Employees Retirement Assn., said in an interview Tuesday that he hired Dixon as an adviser on the sale of bonds to pay off the county's nearly $2-billion liability to the pension system.
OPINION
June 28, 1992
Did the $6-million office refurbish and $1.4-million furniture purchase include a diamond-studded gold plaque engraved "His Royal Highness--Richard Dixon"? JOHN C. MARTIN, Palmdale
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