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Richard Donner

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | DONNA ROSENTHAL
Richard Donner crouches on his hands and knees, directing two giggly boys as they play with a dog holding a turtle in its mouth. The filmmaker is ready to capture this childhood magic, but suddenly, the German shepherd starts gnawing on the turtle. Veteran director Donner flashes a chagrined grin at cinematographer Laszlo Kovacs. On "Radio Flyer," where actors include turtles, frogs and a buffalo who adores Oreo cookies, controlled chaos reigns.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Tom Mankiewicz, a screenwriter and premier script doctor who made his reputation working on such James Bond films as "Diamonds Are Forever," "Live and Let Die" and "The Man With the Golden Gun," has died. He was 68. Mankiewicz, who received a controversial credit for rewriting the 1978 film " Superman" and its 1980 sequel, died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles after a brief illness, according to John Mankiewicz, his cousin. Three months ago, Tom had undergone the Whipple operation, which is used to treat pancreatic cancer.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
FOR once, Superman failed to save the day -- Lois Lane was dead, killed by the machinations of Lex Luthor, and the Man of Steel was left wailing in grief. But then the hero launched himself into the stratosphere and furiously circled the Earth until time itself reversed and he was given a second chance to make things right.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2006 | Geoff Boucher, Times Staff Writer
FOR once, Superman failed to save the day -- Lois Lane was dead, killed by the machinations of Lex Luthor, and the Man of Steel was left wailing in grief. But then the hero launched himself into the stratosphere and furiously circled the Earth until time itself reversed and he was given a second chance to make things right.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Writer-director Elaine May, a much-in-demand script doctor who shuns credit for such work, is currently consulting with the producers of Paramount's updated "Scrooge," which stars Bill Murray and goes before the cameras in a few months under the direction of Richard Donner. Producer Art Linson confirmed that May was "script consultant": "She has a great comic mind. Bill, the writers (Michael O'Donohue and Mitch Glazer) and Richard Donner have welcomed her contributions."
NEWS
December 20, 1990
"The Little Drummer Boy" (1968), directed by Arthur Rankin Jr. and Jules Bass. 30 minutes. No rating. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," directed by Rankin and Bass. 53 minutes. No rating. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town," directed by Rankin and Bass. 53 minutes. No rating. "A Very Merry Cricket" (1973), directed by Chuck Jones. 26 minutes. No rating. "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (1966), directed by Jones. 26 minutes. No rating. "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (1965), directed by Bill Melendez.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The most exciting part of "Timeline," Richard Donner's dud of a time-warp adventure, is the big, blazing balls of death hurled from the trebuchets, catapults used by medieval armies to hurl flaming orbs and the occasional poor soul at the enemy. No one gets catapulted during the climatic siege in "Timeline," about travelers who leap from the 21st century back into a 14th century French battle.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | Leonard Klady
'Twas the night before pre-Christmas and all was not quiet at the production office of Paramount's "Scrooge," where they're modernizing Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," Bill Murray's first major film role since "Ghostbusters." In the new version, which began filming last week in NYC, Murray plays a cynical network programmer overseeing the making of a TV special of the classic.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
The scariest part of this summer's movie lineup is not lizards threatening New York or Texas-sized asteroids threatening Earth, but whether the Hollywood studios behind them will come out alive. After two mega-budgeted films, Sony Pictures' "Godzilla" and Disney's "Armageddon," opened to softer-than-expected attendance, along comes Warner Bros.' entry, "Lethal Weapon 4," into the box-office derby.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | JEFFREY WELLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shooting TV commercials again after 20 years in feature films "was like getting back on a bicycle. It came back to me in no time," said Richard Donner, the director of the three "Lethal Weapon" movies, among others. Donner is one of several Hollywood veterans whose work for the Coca-Cola campaign coordinated by the Creative Artists Agency was unveiled last week.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2003 | Manohla Dargis, Times Staff Writer
The most exciting part of "Timeline," Richard Donner's dud of a time-warp adventure, is the big, blazing balls of death hurled from the trebuchets, catapults used by medieval armies to hurl flaming orbs and the occasional poor soul at the enemy. No one gets catapulted during the climatic siege in "Timeline," about travelers who leap from the 21st century back into a 14th century French battle.
BUSINESS
July 7, 1998 | CLAUDIA ELLER and JAMES BATES
The scariest part of this summer's movie lineup is not lizards threatening New York or Texas-sized asteroids threatening Earth, but whether the Hollywood studios behind them will come out alive. After two mega-budgeted films, Sony Pictures' "Godzilla" and Disney's "Armageddon," opened to softer-than-expected attendance, along comes Warner Bros.' entry, "Lethal Weapon 4," into the box-office derby.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
For those of you who choked on laughter when Sylvester Stallone stood in the middle of a futuristic street in "Judge Dredd," dressed in a Halloween outfit from Nintendo, and bellowed to the skies, "I yam the law!," some good news. Stallone barely raises his voice in Richard Donner's "Assassins," and darned if his character isn't actually engaging. That doesn't mean he is more real than Judge Dredd, or any of the others in the actor's gallery of action heroes.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1993 | JEFFREY WELLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Shooting TV commercials again after 20 years in feature films "was like getting back on a bicycle. It came back to me in no time," said Richard Donner, the director of the three "Lethal Weapon" movies, among others. Donner is one of several Hollywood veterans whose work for the Coca-Cola campaign coordinated by the Creative Artists Agency was unveiled last week.
NEWS
December 20, 1990
"The Little Drummer Boy" (1968), directed by Arthur Rankin Jr. and Jules Bass. 30 minutes. No rating. "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer," directed by Rankin and Bass. 53 minutes. No rating. "Santa Claus Is Coming to Town," directed by Rankin and Bass. 53 minutes. No rating. "A Very Merry Cricket" (1973), directed by Chuck Jones. 26 minutes. No rating. "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (1966), directed by Jones. 26 minutes. No rating. "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (1965), directed by Bill Melendez.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 1990 | DONNA ROSENTHAL
Richard Donner crouches on his hands and knees, directing two giggly boys as they play with a dog holding a turtle in its mouth. The filmmaker is ready to capture this childhood magic, but suddenly, the German shepherd starts gnawing on the turtle. Veteran director Donner flashes a chagrined grin at cinematographer Laszlo Kovacs. On "Radio Flyer," where actors include turtles, frogs and a buffalo who adores Oreo cookies, controlled chaos reigns.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1995 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
For those of you who choked on laughter when Sylvester Stallone stood in the middle of a futuristic street in "Judge Dredd," dressed in a Halloween outfit from Nintendo, and bellowed to the skies, "I yam the law!," some good news. Stallone barely raises his voice in Richard Donner's "Assassins," and darned if his character isn't actually engaging. That doesn't mean he is more real than Judge Dredd, or any of the others in the actor's gallery of action heroes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2010 | By Valerie J. Nelson, Los Angeles Times
Tom Mankiewicz, a screenwriter and premier script doctor who made his reputation working on such James Bond films as "Diamonds Are Forever," "Live and Let Die" and "The Man With the Golden Gun," has died. He was 68. Mankiewicz, who received a controversial credit for rewriting the 1978 film " Superman" and its 1980 sequel, died Saturday at his home in Los Angeles after a brief illness, according to John Mankiewicz, his cousin. Three months ago, Tom had undergone the Whipple operation, which is used to treat pancreatic cancer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 13, 1987 | Leonard Klady
'Twas the night before pre-Christmas and all was not quiet at the production office of Paramount's "Scrooge," where they're modernizing Charles Dickens' "A Christmas Carol," Bill Murray's first major film role since "Ghostbusters." In the new version, which began filming last week in NYC, Murray plays a cynical network programmer overseeing the making of a TV special of the classic.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 20, 1987 | Leonard Klady
Writer-director Elaine May, a much-in-demand script doctor who shuns credit for such work, is currently consulting with the producers of Paramount's updated "Scrooge," which stars Bill Murray and goes before the cameras in a few months under the direction of Richard Donner. Producer Art Linson confirmed that May was "script consultant": "She has a great comic mind. Bill, the writers (Michael O'Donohue and Mitch Glazer) and Richard Donner have welcomed her contributions."
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