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Richard Dresser

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NEWS
October 15, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
To playwright Richard Dresser, writing a one-act play is like writing a short story. "It has to be very economical," Dresser says. "It's a great challenge to do it in a very limited amount of time. What I always want to do is write a full (short) play with a beginning, middle and end. . . . When it works, it's a wonderful thing."
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Richard Dresser has written a string of acclaimed comedies in the last 20 years without quite breaking through to the theatrical big time. Maybe "Rounding Third," about a Little League team's coaching staff, will finally get him to home base.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, Richard Dresser wrote himself into what he calls "a playwright's vision of hell." John Jory, producing director of the Humana Festival of New American Plays, one of the nation's leading theater showcases, had gotten an idea: put on a short comedy to be set entirely in the front seat of an automobile--an actual automobile--which would be parked in front of the festival site, the Actors Theatre of Louisville.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2003 | Mike Boehm
Richard Dresser always intended for "Rounding Third," his two-character comedy about mismatched dads coaching their sons' Little League baseball team, to open with the pair meeting in a bar. And that's how it's playing in its West Coast premiere at the Laguna Playhouse. But one actor's fame prevented the playwright from having it his way in the only previous production, last fall at the Northlight Theatre in Skokie, Ill.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 6, 2003 | Don Shirley, Times Staff Writer
Richard Dresser has written a string of acclaimed comedies in the last 20 years without quite breaking through to the theatrical big time. Maybe "Rounding Third," about a Little League team's coaching staff, will finally get him to home base.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes frequently on theater for The Times
Richard Dresser once wrote a brief one-act titled "The Road to Ruin." It's a minor piece with a title that says everything about Dresser's world--which is to say, America. He likes to set his plays in such places as Indiana and New England and Florida and New Jersey, but whatever the specific place, the pressures of a collapsing country are ever-present.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2000
ANAHEIM 8:30pm Pop Music Aimee Mann and Michael Penn as the first couple of literate pop are two of the anchors at the stimulating music scene at the Largo in L.A., both in their solo shows and in their occasional teamings. With Mann's profile high after her acclaimed songs for the film "Magnolia"--one of them got an Oscar nomination--the husband and wife bring their collaboration to some larger settings, including the Sun Theatre in Anaheim. * Aimee Mann and Michael Penn, Sun Theatre, 2200 E.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2003 | Mike Boehm
Richard Dresser always intended for "Rounding Third," his two-character comedy about mismatched dads coaching their sons' Little League baseball team, to open with the pair meeting in a bar. And that's how it's playing in its West Coast premiere at the Laguna Playhouse. But one actor's fame prevented the playwright from having it his way in the only previous production, last fall at the Northlight Theatre in Skokie, Ill.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
In person, Richard Dresser hardly seems the sort of fellow who would put the screws to you. Meeting his guest in the pool patio at a Santa Monica hotel, he makes sure that everyone has had coffee and that no one has to sit in the blazing sun. His manner is uncalculated, full of a satisfied working man's casual charm. Yet there's a devil inside Dresser, which he reserves for the hours he's writing plays.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
For Richard Dresser, discovering that his son's Little League coach planned to cheat in a playoff game was a spur to action. "I was so disturbed and appalled, I knew I had to write about it," the veteran comic playwright and TV writer says. The result is "Rounding Third," which opens tonight in its West Coast premiere at the Laguna Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2003 | Mike Boehm, Times Staff Writer
For Richard Dresser, discovering that his son's Little League coach planned to cheat in a playoff game was a spur to action. "I was so disturbed and appalled, I knew I had to write about it," the veteran comic playwright and TV writer says. The result is "Rounding Third," which opens tonight in its West Coast premiere at the Laguna Playhouse.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 2000
ANAHEIM 8:30pm Pop Music Aimee Mann and Michael Penn as the first couple of literate pop are two of the anchors at the stimulating music scene at the Largo in L.A., both in their solo shows and in their occasional teamings. With Mann's profile high after her acclaimed songs for the film "Magnolia"--one of them got an Oscar nomination--the husband and wife bring their collaboration to some larger settings, including the Sun Theatre in Anaheim. * Aimee Mann and Michael Penn, Sun Theatre, 2200 E.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last year, Richard Dresser wrote himself into what he calls "a playwright's vision of hell." John Jory, producing director of the Humana Festival of New American Plays, one of the nation's leading theater showcases, had gotten an idea: put on a short comedy to be set entirely in the front seat of an automobile--an actual automobile--which would be parked in front of the festival site, the Actors Theatre of Louisville.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Dresser's dark, sardonic corporate comedy "Below the Belt" is aptly named. Hitting below the belt is off-limits in boxing. But the brutality of one man punching another until someone is knocked unconscious is a pale runner-up to the corporate world, where the means justify the end--and the meaner the means, the better. The show was a hit at the 1995 Humana Festival in Louisville, Ky., and opened off-Broadway last year.
NEWS
October 29, 1993 | ROBERT KOEHLER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Robert Koehler writes frequently on theater for The Times
Richard Dresser once wrote a brief one-act titled "The Road to Ruin." It's a minor piece with a title that says everything about Dresser's world--which is to say, America. He likes to set his plays in such places as Indiana and New England and Florida and New Jersey, but whatever the specific place, the pressures of a collapsing country are ever-present.
NEWS
October 15, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T.H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times.
To playwright Richard Dresser, writing a one-act play is like writing a short story. "It has to be very economical," Dresser says. "It's a great challenge to do it in a very limited amount of time. What I always want to do is write a full (short) play with a beginning, middle and end. . . . When it works, it's a wonderful thing."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 6, 1997 | NANCY CHURNIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Dresser's dark, sardonic corporate comedy "Below the Belt" is aptly named. Hitting below the belt is off-limits in boxing. But the brutality of one man punching another until someone is knocked unconscious is a pale runner-up to the corporate world, where the means justify the end--and the meaner the means, the better. The show was a hit at the 1995 Humana Festival in Louisville, Ky., and opened off-Broadway last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 1989 | ROBERT KOEHLER
In person, Richard Dresser hardly seems the sort of fellow who would put the screws to you. Meeting his guest in the pool patio at a Santa Monica hotel, he makes sure that everyone has had coffee and that no one has to sit in the blazing sun. His manner is uncalculated, full of a satisfied working man's casual charm. Yet there's a devil inside Dresser, which he reserves for the hours he's writing plays.
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