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Richard E Byrd

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October 10, 1988 | United Press International
The son of polar explorer Adm. Richard E. Byrd, whose body was found in a vacant warehouse last week, died of malnutrition and dehydration, the state medical examiner announced today. Richard E. Byrd Jr., 68, who was discovered in the warehouse three weeks after setting out by train for a ceremony in Washington to honor his father, died of natural causes, a medical examiner spokeswoman said.
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NEWS
May 9, 1996 | BOYCE RENSBERGER, WASHINGTON POST
Richard E. Byrd, the famed American polar explorer who claimed in 1926--70 years ago today--to have been the first person to fly over the North Pole, may actually have turned back two hours and 150 miles short of his goal, according to new evidence released by Ohio State University's Byrd Polar Research Institute. The clues are in Byrd's long lost diary of the expedition, which an archivist at the center recently found in a mislabeled box of Byrd's memorabilia.
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NEWS
May 9, 1996 | BOYCE RENSBERGER, WASHINGTON POST
Richard E. Byrd, the famed American polar explorer who claimed in 1926--70 years ago today--to have been the first person to fly over the North Pole, may actually have turned back two hours and 150 miles short of his goal, according to new evidence released by Ohio State University's Byrd Polar Research Institute. The clues are in Byrd's long lost diary of the expedition, which an archivist at the center recently found in a mislabeled box of Byrd's memorabilia.
NEWS
October 10, 1988 | United Press International
The son of polar explorer Adm. Richard E. Byrd, whose body was found in a vacant warehouse last week, died of malnutrition and dehydration, the state medical examiner announced today. Richard E. Byrd Jr., 68, who was discovered in the warehouse three weeks after setting out by train for a ceremony in Washington to honor his father, died of natural causes, a medical examiner spokeswoman said.
NEWS
August 11, 1988 | Associated Press
The U.S. Postal Service said today it is issuing a block of commemorative stamps honoring four American explorers of the Antarctic--Nathaniel B. Palmer, Charles Wilkes, Richard E. Byrd and Lincoln Ellsworth--on stamps to be issued Sept. 14 in ceremonies at the National Geographic Society in Washington.
SPORTS
December 18, 1994 | Associated Press
Only days shy of his 89th birthday, explorer Norman Vaughn reached the summit of the 10,300-foot-high Antarctic mountain that bears his name. Vaughn, who turns 89 Monday, and his team spent Friday night atop Mount Vaughan, expedition organizers said Saturday. In 1928, Vaughan joined Adm. Richard E. Byrd's South Pole expedition as a 22-year-old Harvard dropout and became the first American to drive dogs in the Antarctic. It was Byrd who named the Queen Maud Mountains peak in Vaughan's honor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1993 | ED BOND
A Sun Valley seventh-grader was awarded the top prize Tuesday in a poster contest sponsored by merchants and residents. Roselyn Vien, a student at Richard E. Byrd Middle School, won first prize and a $150 U. S. Savings Bond. The contest promoting recycling and environmental awareness was sponsored by the Sun Valley Residents' Assn. and the Sun Valley Kiwanis Club. "One of the biggest problems in our area is a lack of a sense of community," said Jan Liptak, who heads the association.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 2012 | Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Barry Alan Berkus, a California architect who left a deep imprint on mass-market housing, spurring trends toward homes with grand entrances, high ceilings, master suites, natural light and open spaces, has died. He was 77. Berkus, who had leukemia, died Nov. 30 in Santa Barbara, where he had lived for more than 30 years, said his architect son, Jeffrey. During a career that spanned nearly six decades, the senior Berkus built a portfolio of 600,000 dwellings encompassing about 10,000 designs in developments across the United States, including Playa Vista in Los Angeles, Harbor View in Newport Beach, Turtle Rock Highlands and Woodbridge Landing in Irvine, and Park Imperial South in Palm Springs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 1999
A fire of suspicious origin damaged an office at Richard E. Byrd Middle School in Sun Valley on Saturday, a Los Angeles Fire Department spokesman said. Firefighters were called to the single-story building in the 9100 block of Telfair Avenue at 4:34 p.m., spokesman Jim Wells said. No one was injured in the blaze, which fire officials said caused about $10,000 in damage. The fire was extinguished within 15 minutes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1999
Alton Lindsey, 92, believed to be the last living scientist from the Antarctica expeditions of Adm. Richard E. Byrd. Lindsey was the son of a Methodist minister who was born in the Pittsburgh area in 1907. He graduated from Allegheny College and was in doctoral studies in biology at Cornell University when he was selected to join the crew of Byrd's second Antarctic expedition in 1933. He became its vertebrate zoologist, studying seals and penguins.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 14, 1998
H.D. "Doc" Quigg, 86, a globe-girdling correspondent for United Press International for half a century. Born Horace Dasher Quigg in Boonville, Mo., Quigg took his nickname from his doctor father and carefully avoided ever spelling out his full name. He studied arts and journalism at the University of Missouri and began his career at the Boonville Daily News. He soon joined United Press (later International) in Cleveland and in 1937 transferred to his permanent base of New York.
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