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Richard E Friedman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Richard E. Friedman likes a good thriller. He's a Raymond Chandler aficionado (like many other Bible scholars, it just so happens). So when he sat down after 10 years of looking into who wrote the Bible, he thought of writing his book in the style of Alfred Hitchcock. After all, there was a fundamental mystery: Whodunit? There was a large body of clues to be examined and sorted through.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Richard E. Friedman likes a good thriller. He's a Raymond Chandler aficionado (like many other Bible scholars, it just so happens). So when he sat down after 10 years of looking into who wrote the Bible, he thought of writing his book in the style of Alfred Hitchcock. After all, there was a fundamental mystery: Whodunit? There was a large body of clues to be examined and sorted through.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1997 | JOHN DART
More than 1,000 study guides to the Oscar-winning motion picture "Schindler's List," which will be shown on NBC on Sunday night, were distributed through Los Angeles city schools and the Los Angeles Catholic Archdiocese. The study guides were originally produced for the 1993 theater run of the Steven Spielberg-directed movie by Alex Grobman, then-director of the Martyrs Memorial and Museum of the Holocaust at the Jewish Federation of Greater Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 21, 1987 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Richard E. Friedman likes a good thriller. Like many other Bible scholars, as it happens, he's a Raymond Chandler aficionado. So when he sat down after 10 years of looking into who wrote the Bible, he thought of writing his book in the style of someone like, say, Alfred Hitchcock. After all, there was a fundamental mystery--Whodunit? There was a large body of clues to be examined and sorted through.
NEWS
June 10, 1997 | JOHN DART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Prague rabbi--who escaped a Nazi death train--claimed to have discovered coded messages in the Hebrew Bible shortly after World War II. He declared, among other things, that the word "Torah" was spelled in the books of Genesis, Exodus, Numbers and Deuteronomy--you just had to take the first letter of each book and skip ahead 50 letters at a time.
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