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Richard E Leakey

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NEWS
February 13, 1991
The African Society for Animal Protection has announced that world-renowned paleoanthropologist Richard E. Leakey has accepted the post of honorary chairman with the new American conservationist group. ASAP, a nonprofit organization, is dedicated to preserving the wildlife population of East Africa, particularly the elephant. The group also will focus on efforts to reduce poaching in the region. For more information, write to ASAP, Grand Central Station P.O. Box 5965, New York, N.Y. 10163-5965.
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NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Renowned conservationist Richard Leakey has resigned from his post as head of the civil service and leader of a team designed to extricate Kenya from its myriad economic problems, the president's office said. Leakey, who has made enemies with his blunt approach and has had a difficult relationship with President Daniel Arap Moi, volunteered to step down, the office said. Leakey could not be reached for comment. Leakey was named by Moi to head the civil service in 1999.
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NEWS
May 8, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
This is what happened after Richard E. Leakey, world-renowned paleontologist, author and conservationist, head of the Kenya National Museums for 20 years, decided to speak out on the issue of wildlife poaching in the country's national parks: Leakey's reputation as a scientist and museum administrator was harshly attacked in the local press. The government reorganized the museum board behind his back, prompting him to submit his resignation. Despite being a native Kenyan and a citizen, whose younger brother serves in the Kenyan Parliament and as deputy tourism minister, Leakey was derided by one government minister as a "cheeky white" who felt that black Africans could not manage their own affairs.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man charged with rescuing Kenya's civil service from the depths of mismanagement and corruption has been praised as an industrious and efficient administrator--and slammed as an arrogant son of white colonialists. Richard Leakey, the famed paleontologist and conservationist who was recently appointed to head Kenya's public service sector, will need all those character traits in his new job. Supporters believe that Leakey has the medicine needed to cure the country's economic ills.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | Associated Press
Under pressure from donors to straighten out Kenya's economic mess, President Daniel Arap Moi made key changes in his administration Friday, putting paleontologist Richard Leakey in charge of the civil service. Leakey, head of the Kenya Wildlife Service, was named Cabinet secretary and permanent secretary over the bloated public service. Moi has on numerous occasions publicly stated his aversion to Leakey, a third-generation white Kenyan who is recognized as an efficient and charismatic
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
Criticism mounted against the government Friday after opposition figures and journalists reported being attacked by ruling party supporters and plainclothes police. The attacks took place Thursday in Nakuru, a city about 85 miles northwest of Nairobi. Renowned paleontologist Richard Leakey was whipped by several men and his car damaged outside the courthouse Thursday in full view of police officers, he said.
NEWS
March 27, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Renowned conservationist Richard Leakey has resigned from his post as head of the civil service and leader of a team designed to extricate Kenya from its myriad economic problems, the president's office said. Leakey, who has made enemies with his blunt approach and has had a difficult relationship with President Daniel Arap Moi, volunteered to step down, the office said. Leakey could not be reached for comment. Leakey was named by Moi to head the civil service in 1999.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed conservationist Richard Leakey has boldly criticized the Kenyan government for corruption and social decay and joined the call for a new political opposition in his home country--a step that has provoked harsh reaction here, inflamed racial sensitivities and perhaps nudged this country closer to chaos.
NEWS
August 14, 1999 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man charged with rescuing Kenya's civil service from the depths of mismanagement and corruption has been praised as an industrious and efficient administrator--and slammed as an arrogant son of white colonialists. Richard Leakey, the famed paleontologist and conservationist who was recently appointed to head Kenya's public service sector, will need all those character traits in his new job. Supporters believe that Leakey has the medicine needed to cure the country's economic ills.
NEWS
July 5, 1992 | YVONNE BASKIN, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Kenyan fish technologist Joseph Ogunja holds up a reptilian-looking piece of leather and points with satisfaction to a photograph on his office wall. It shows three styles of shoes, a purse and a belt, all made from similar hides. The tanned hide of Nile perch caught in Lake Victoria hasn't yet taken the fashion world by storm, and Ogunja is still refining a recipe for perch sausage.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | Associated Press
Under pressure from donors to straighten out Kenya's economic mess, President Daniel Arap Moi made key changes in his administration Friday, putting paleontologist Richard Leakey in charge of the civil service. Leakey, head of the Kenya Wildlife Service, was named Cabinet secretary and permanent secretary over the bloated public service. Moi has on numerous occasions publicly stated his aversion to Leakey, a third-generation white Kenyan who is recognized as an efficient and charismatic
NEWS
August 12, 1995 | From Associated Press
Criticism mounted against the government Friday after opposition figures and journalists reported being attacked by ruling party supporters and plainclothes police. The attacks took place Thursday in Nakuru, a city about 85 miles northwest of Nairobi. Renowned paleontologist Richard Leakey was whipped by several men and his car damaged outside the courthouse Thursday in full view of police officers, he said.
NEWS
May 20, 1995 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Famed conservationist Richard Leakey has boldly criticized the Kenyan government for corruption and social decay and joined the call for a new political opposition in his home country--a step that has provoked harsh reaction here, inflamed racial sensitivities and perhaps nudged this country closer to chaos.
NEWS
February 13, 1991
The African Society for Animal Protection has announced that world-renowned paleoanthropologist Richard E. Leakey has accepted the post of honorary chairman with the new American conservationist group. ASAP, a nonprofit organization, is dedicated to preserving the wildlife population of East Africa, particularly the elephant. The group also will focus on efforts to reduce poaching in the region. For more information, write to ASAP, Grand Central Station P.O. Box 5965, New York, N.Y. 10163-5965.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, Times Staff Writer
This is what happened after Richard E. Leakey, world-renowned paleontologist, author and conservationist, head of the Kenya National Museums for 20 years, decided to speak out on the issue of wildlife poaching in the country's national parks: Leakey's reputation as a scientist and museum administrator was harshly attacked in the local press. The government reorganized the museum board behind his back, prompting him to submit his resignation. Despite being a native Kenyan and a citizen, whose younger brother serves in the Kenyan Parliament and as deputy tourism minister, Leakey was derided by one government minister as a "cheeky white" who felt that black Africans could not manage their own affairs.
NEWS
August 9, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rarely during his 19 years in power has Kenyan President Daniel Arap Moi appeared more embattled and isolated. Foreign allies who once lauded the relative stability of his regime now openly criticize its repressive moves against critics. The International Monetary Fund has blocked an aid package to the East African nation, citing widespread government corruption and other financial scandals.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | MARY LOU LOPER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Jacques Andreani, ambassador of France to the United States, arrived in Los Angeles, he and his wife Donatella buzzed to Orange County. They wanted to visit Orange High School, where she was an American Field Service exchange student in 1962. This week, the couple (she in Dior black and white polka dots with a clump of the Dior emblematic lily of the valley flowers on her shoulder) attended the party French Consul Gen. Gerard Coste and his wife, Naomi, gave in their Beverly Hills home.
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