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Richard E Lyng

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NEWS
August 4, 1988 | from the Washington Post
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng warned Wednesday that a $5-billion farm drought-relief package will run into trouble at the White House unless congressional conferees scale down parts of the bill. Lyng declined to threaten a veto recommendation, but he told conferees, meeting for the first time to work out differences in House and Senate versions, that the Administration would insist on eliminating costly add-ons.
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NEWS
August 4, 1988 | from the Washington Post
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng warned Wednesday that a $5-billion farm drought-relief package will run into trouble at the White House unless congressional conferees scale down parts of the bill. Lyng declined to threaten a veto recommendation, but he told conferees, meeting for the first time to work out differences in House and Senate versions, that the Administration would insist on eliminating costly add-ons.
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BUSINESS
December 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Farmers can be fairly optimistic about 1988 although cash income is expected to decline a bit from this year's record level, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said Tuesday. "I think farmers are playing it pretty close to their vests, and I wouldn't want to encourage them to go out and incur huge debts again," Lyng told reporters. "It's not an easy game, and it varies a lot depending upon the commodity."
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Despite bleak prospects for rain any time soon, it is too early to discuss details of an income-protection plan for drought-stricken farmers, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said Friday after briefing President Reagan on the worsening conditions. However, Lyng told reporters, a 1986 measure that paid $535 million to 180,000 victims of drought, floods and hailstorms might serve as the basis for legislative action this summer.
NEWS
July 2, 1988 | PAUL HOUSTON, Times Staff Writer
Despite bleak prospects for rain any time soon, it is too early to discuss details of an income-protection plan for drought-stricken farmers, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said Friday after briefing President Reagan on the worsening conditions. However, Lyng told reporters, a 1986 measure that paid $535 million to 180,000 victims of drought, floods and hailstorms might serve as the basis for legislative action this summer.
NEWS
February 3, 1987 | From Reuters
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng will be hospitalized within the next week for a hernia repair operation, Agriculture Department officials confirmed.
NEWS
February 10, 1987 | United Press International
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng has appointed Bingham County farmer Allan F. Larsen to the U.S. Agriculture Stabilization and Conservation Committee.
NEWS
April 20, 1986
Washington will go ahead in May with curbs on agricultural imports from the European Communities in retaliation for the introduction of Common Market levies on imports by Spain and Portugal, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said. Washington maintains that the levies will cost U.S. farmers an estimated $1 billion a year in lost sales and has demanded compensation.
BUSINESS
November 4, 1986
J. Patrick Boyle, an aide to Sen. Pete Wilson (R-Calif.), has been named head of the Agricultural Marketing Service, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng, announced. Boyle, 32, has worked for Wilson since February, 1985, as a legislative assistant for farm issues. His new job as administrator of the Agriculture Department agency pays $70,500 a year.
BUSINESS
December 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Farmers can be fairly optimistic about 1988 although cash income is expected to decline a bit from this year's record level, Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng said Tuesday. "I think farmers are playing it pretty close to their vests, and I wouldn't want to encourage them to go out and incur huge debts again," Lyng told reporters. "It's not an easy game, and it varies a lot depending upon the commodity."
NEWS
October 30, 1987 | United Press International
Agriculture Secretary Richard E. Lyng will travel to Europe on Nov. 2 to discuss ongoing global trade negotiations and farm trade issues with foreign agricultural ministers, officials announced Thursday. He will address the U. N. Food and Agriculture Organization's biannual conference in Rome on Nov. 10.
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