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Richard E Wiley

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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President-elect George W. Bush began crafting a technology agenda for his incoming administration, one of the first calls his aides made was to Washington communications lawyer Richard E. Wiley. Little known outside a small fraternity of industry insiders, Wiley has carved out an influential role as a telecommunications power broker since leaving as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission in 1977.
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BUSINESS
January 15, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President-elect George W. Bush began crafting a technology agenda for his incoming administration, one of the first calls his aides made was to Washington communications lawyer Richard E. Wiley. Little known outside a small fraternity of industry insiders, Wiley has carved out an influential role as a telecommunications power broker since leaving as chairman of the Federal Communications Commission in 1977.
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BUSINESS
September 25, 1996 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Urging broadcasters to boost their commitment to local political races, Federal Communications Commission Chairman Reed Hundt on Tuesday applauded a move by a Dallas-based chain of TV stations to provide free air time to candidates for governor, U.S. Senate and House of Representatives. The company, A.H. Belo Corp., filed an application with the FCC on Monday to dole out five-minute blocks of air time to candidates to use as they please.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1994 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days after the selection of a technical standard moved high-definition TV closer to reality, disgruntled broadcasters are pushing new HDTV proposals that threaten to delay the long-awaited technology.
BUSINESS
May 25, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rival groups announced Monday that they would work together to develop a high-definition television system that would be available to consumers within three to five years and priced $1,000 to $2,000 more than conventional TV sets.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2002 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Media consolidation has not reduced the diversity of programs on television and radio, although concentration of ownership may result in more TV commercials and similar slants in news coverage, according to government studies released Tuesday. The Federal Communications Commission requested the 12 studies as part of its review of media-ownership rules, which cap the growth of broadcasters and restrict TV stations from merging with newspapers and radio stations in the same market.
OPINION
October 14, 2006 | Jon Healey, JON HEALEY is an editorial writer at The Times. jon.healey@latimes.com
AMERICAN presidents often complain about the press, but none in the modern era matched Richard M. Nixon's venom for the Fourth Estate. Nixon's resentment of the Washington Post was so intense, recordings from the Oval Office show, that he and his aides plotted an unusual form of regulatory retaliation: forcing the Post to give up the TV and radio stations it owned in Washington, D.C., and Florida by blocking the renewal of its broadcast licenses.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2002 | JUBE SHIVER Jr. and SALLIE HOFMEISTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A U.S. appeals court on Tuesday ordered federal regulators to justify a long-standing rule barring media companies from owning more than one TV station in about half of the nation's television markets. The court said the Federal Communications Commission's TV ownership restriction is arbitrary because it does not include newspapers, cable TV systems and radio stations when measuring diversity, competition and the number of "voices" available to an audience.
BUSINESS
September 20, 1993 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Clinton Administration redoubling its effort to modernize the nation's information infrastructure, a once-sleepy arm of the Commerce Department that is advising the President on the issue is suddenly rising to political prominence. At center stage is the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, a Commerce unit that evolved from the Office of Telecommunications Policy created by then-President Richard M. Nixon in 1970.
BUSINESS
July 24, 2001 | JUBE SHIVER Jr., TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could lead to changes in the way Americans watch television, five major Hollywood studios have agreed on an anti-piracy technology designed to protect digital movies and other forms of video entertainment from theft. The move could speed the replacement of old analog TVs and cable set-top boxes and bring VCRs with new devices that can unscramble, record and store encrypted digital programming.
BUSINESS
April 14, 2007 | Jim Puzzanghera, Times Staff Writer
Don Imus' comments about the Rutgers University women's basketball team cost him his job, but in all likelihood won't cost the broadcasters of his show a cent in federal fines. Despite calls from the Rev. Al Sharpton and the head of the Congressional Black Caucus for sanctions against CBS Radio stations that aired Imus' remarks, the Federal Communications Commission has authority to levy fines only for sexually indecent and profane comments over the public airwaves.
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