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Richard Eder

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NEWS
July 30, 2001
The article about my Atlantic Monthly essay "A Reader's Manifesto" ("For Prose Warrior, Lit'rature Is the Enemy," July 16) describes me as rising to the challenge of a "rather testy" Rene Montaigne. Ms. Montaigne had me babbling like a ninny in response to several other questions, but she and NPR were kind enough to leave only my more articulate responses in the edited version of the interview. Neither of us saw the discussion as a debate, but if it was one, Ms. Montaigne won it hands down.
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BOOKS
May 12, 1991
The use of the word gyp (Richard Eder's review of "Subtraction," Feb. 17) constitutes an ethnic slur. DAVID M. SHERR, SANTA MONICA
BOOKS
February 28, 1999 | STEVE WASSERMAN, Steve Wasserman is Book Editor of The Times
Richard Eder is retiring from The Times. Today's review will be his last for this newspaper, alas. Now 66 years old, Eder has served as the paper's Book Critic since joining The Times in 1982; his column also appeared simultaneously in Newsday. In 1987, he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for his criticism. That same year he received the annual citation of the National Book Critics Circle.
BOOKS
November 29, 1987
Richard Eder comments (The Book Review, Nov. 1) that in "Riddley Walker," Russell Hoban "made an astonishing flight into the minds and speech of prehistoric humans." Make that post-historic. "Riddley Walker" deals with far-in-the-future survivors of a nuclear holocaust that has nearly obliterated the history and artifacts of our civilization. DONALD DRURY Long Beach
BOOKS
June 12, 1994
In his review of Jeremy Treglown's biography of Roald Dahl (Book Review, April 17), Richard Eder writes, "As a bachelor in Washington, D.C., (Dahl) painted the genitals of the rhinoceroses on the Q Street bridge." As someone whose in-laws live less than a hundred yards from that bridge, I don't know whether the mistake was a misperception by an overstimulated Dahl, or an error by his biographer, but I do know that those animals on the Q Street bridge are bison--and indeed, many Georgetown residents refer to the structure affectionately as "the Buffalo Bridge."
BOOKS
November 12, 1995
One wonders if Richard Eder remembered accurately Marianne Wiggins' novel "John Dollar," if he can describe it as "the entrancing tale of children marooned" ("Turmoil in the Front Row," Oct. 15). Even readers with strong stomachs must have had some problems with the clinically graphic descriptions of human cannibalism and festering, lethal wounds that make up a large part of the narrative. Vile? Yes. Appropriate? Who Knows? "Entrancing"? Never! LEONORA HOLDER, LONG BEACH
BOOKS
October 20, 1985
I would like to remind Richard Eder, the Los Angeles Times' best book reviewer in my opinion, that it was not the Belgian Rene Magritte who painted the mustache on the Mona Lisa, as he indicated in his review of "After the Ball Is Over" (View, Oct. 2), but rather, the Frenchman Marcel Duchamp. No doubt the young Duchamp grew especially tired of the adulation accorded La Gioconda, living so close to her, and gave in to his urge to deface the painting if only by proxy. MEL ROSENBERG Principal Librarian Art, Music and Recreation Department Los Angeles
BOOKS
January 24, 1988
Judge Bazelon explicates a justice's perilous task: balancing society's real need for security and order against the right of the accused to a fair trial and just punishment.--Jerry Pacht A WOMAN RUN MAD by John L'Heureux (Viking: $17.95; 272 pp.) Four main characters, representing in different ways the rational flower of our contemporary urbanity, by the end of the book have fallen into madness and monstrosity.--Richard Eder
BOOKS
December 13, 1998
Herewith, nine works of fiction and one of nonfiction: THE HOURS; By Michael Cunningham; (Farrar, Straus and Giroux: 230 pp., $22) A contemporary gay writer simultaneously affirms and dissolves the category with a novel that is simply a particular door into a universal fiction. A set of contemporary characters re-voices the patterns of Virginia Woolf's "Mrs. Dalloway" (one of them is Woolf herself).
BOOKS
November 12, 1995
One wonders if Richard Eder remembered accurately Marianne Wiggins' novel "John Dollar," if he can describe it as "the entrancing tale of children marooned" ("Turmoil in the Front Row," Oct. 15). Even readers with strong stomachs must have had some problems with the clinically graphic descriptions of human cannibalism and festering, lethal wounds that make up a large part of the narrative. Vile? Yes. Appropriate? Who Knows? "Entrancing"? Never! LEONORA HOLDER, LONG BEACH
BOOKS
June 12, 1994
In his review of Jeremy Treglown's biography of Roald Dahl (Book Review, April 17), Richard Eder writes, "As a bachelor in Washington, D.C., (Dahl) painted the genitals of the rhinoceroses on the Q Street bridge." As someone whose in-laws live less than a hundred yards from that bridge, I don't know whether the mistake was a misperception by an overstimulated Dahl, or an error by his biographer, but I do know that those animals on the Q Street bridge are bison--and indeed, many Georgetown residents refer to the structure affectionately as "the Buffalo Bridge."
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
In correcting Jay McInerney and Richard Eder, Andrew Dungan (Letters, July 12), is quite certain that "Brightness Falls" from the hair, not from the air. He is certainly right that we read the usual version of the line, "Brightness falls from the air," in a modern, symbolist way that would have made little sense to Elizabethan readers. And I too was completely convinced by J.V. Cunningham's argument. But as it happens, his proof was not quite conclusive. Wesley Trimpi has published a long, detailed paper in which he shows that the line Nashe wrote is probably "Brightness falls from the air" and that it made perfectly good sense to Elizabethans in terms of contemporary theories of disease.
BOOKS
February 16, 1992
Your readers are perhaps too erudite (or is it recondite?) for your columnists. Fred Scifers (Letters, Jan. 5) reads Richard Eder, doesn't recognize bloviate , reaches for the Oxford English Dictionary, doesn't find the word, and writes to you in dismay. If he'd merely tried Merriam-Webster's Third Unabridged, he'd have found the word, defined "to orate verbosely and windily," and the etymology ("prob. irreg. fr. blow + -i- + ate") but regrettably (because Webster's 3, for all its virtues, isn't as comprehensive as the OED)
BOOKS
August 9, 1992
In correcting Jay McInerney and Richard Eder, Andrew Dungan (Letters, July 12), is quite certain that "Brightness Falls" from the hair, not from the air. He is certainly right that we read the usual version of the line, "Brightness falls from the air," in a modern, symbolist way that would have made little sense to Elizabethan readers. And I too was completely convinced by J.V. Cunningham's argument. But as it happens, his proof was not quite conclusive. Wesley Trimpi has published a long, detailed paper in which he shows that the line Nashe wrote is probably "Brightness falls from the air" and that it made perfectly good sense to Elizabethans in terms of contemporary theories of disease.
BOOKS
May 12, 1991
The use of the word gyp (Richard Eder's review of "Subtraction," Feb. 17) constitutes an ethnic slur. DAVID M. SHERR, SANTA MONICA
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