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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a recent article on the growth of Japanese investments in Hollywood, Newsweek magazine cited special-effects wizard Richard Edlund as one of the benefactors of the growing trend. The article said that Japanese money was helping Edlund "break into directing" with "Crisis 2050," a science-fiction adventure budgeted at "a whopping $50 million." For Edlund, would that it were so. "Everybody loves to get into 'Newsweek,' but that kind of publicity can work two ways," says Edlund.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1989 | CHARLES SOLOMON
In a recent article on the growth of Japanese investments in Hollywood, Newsweek magazine cited special-effects wizard Richard Edlund as one of the benefactors of the growing trend. The article said that Japanese money was helping Edlund "break into directing" with "Crisis 2050," a science-fiction adventure budgeted at "a whopping $50 million." For Edlund, would that it were so. "Everybody loves to get into 'Newsweek,' but that kind of publicity can work two ways," says Edlund.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 10, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Japanese Fund 'Crisis': Japanese money continues to flow into Hollywood. This time two major Japanese companies are footing the bill for a $30-million film to be produced by special effects wizard Richard Edlund ("Star Wars," "Raiders of the Lost Ark"), a four-time Oscar winner. "Solar Crisis," a futuristic story about a mission to the sun in the year 2050, drew funding from NHK Enterprises, a unit of the Japanese TV network, and the multimedia concern Gakken Publishing Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 1994 | CHRIS WILLMAN and * MPAA-rating: PG-13. Times guidelines: Generally OK for kids, although blood is shed during the Crucifixion scenes.
"What if Jesus Christ came for the first time in 1993?" That's the provocative question being posed in radio commercials for the evangelical fantasy film "The Judas Project." (The 1993 part isn't meant to imply it happened and we missed it; rather, the ads just haven't been updated since the feature had a regional run in the South last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 4, 2006 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Arthur Widmer, a pioneer in film special-effects technology who received a lifetime achievement award last year from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, has died. He was 92. Widmer died of cancer May 28 at his home in Hollywood, according to publicist Jane Ayer. In presenting the award to Widmer on Feb. 12, 2005, the academy noted his significant contributions to the development of the Ultra Violet and "blue screen" compositing processes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1987 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
"Masters of the Universe" (citywide) is a misfiring, underdone epic that takes its inspiration not from life or literature, but from a toy line and the cartoon series it inspired. Unfortunately, the film might have worked better with the cartoon characters in the leads. Or even the toys. You couldn't get a more polyethylene performance than Dolph Lundgren gives.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | BETTY GOODWIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a land of architectural stars, it was evident that Richard Neutra was a superstar long before many of L.A.'s well-known types were out of diapers. Considered by many to be the city's greatest modernist, Neutra, who died in 1970 at age 78, was toasted on the occasion of what would have been his 100th birthday Wednesday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 1989 | David Pecchia \f7
The Boneyard (Backbone). Shooting in Asheville, N.C. This horror story is propelled by the discovery of three dead Chinese children and the subsequent probe by the county coroner's office into the surrounding mystery. Executive producer Jeffrey Sanfilippo. Producer Richard Brophy. Director/screenwriter James Cummins. Stars Ed Nelson, Deborah Rose, Norman Fell, James Eustermann, Denise Young and Phyllis Diller in a dramatic role. February release. Broken Spur (Sandpiper).
NEWS
October 25, 1990 | MIKE BELL
Once the Halloween ritual of handing out candy and making the neighborhood rounds with the kids is safely past, put the little ones to bed, gather up the leftover candy and get the VCR warmed up. Wednesday night is the perfect "Fright Night." Scary, funny and intentionally campy, "Fright Night" revolves around teen-ager Charlie Brewster (William Ragsdale), who innocently looks out his window one night and spots his new neighbor moving in next door.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 7, 2013 | By Susan King
The Visual Effects Society announced Monday morning its nominees for the 11th annual VES Awards, which honors visual effects artistry in 24 categories of film, animation, television, commercials and video games. Nominees for outstanding visual effects in a visual effects-driven feature motion picture are "The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey," "Prometheus," "Life of Pi," "The Avengers" and "Battleship. " Vying for outstanding supporting visual effects in a feature motion picture are "Rust and Bone," "The Impossible," "Argo," "Flight" and "Zero Dark Thirty" Outstanding animation in an animated feature motion picture are "Brave," "ParaNorman," "Rise of the Guardians," "Wreck-It Ralph" and "Hotel Transylvania.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 6, 2013 | By Susan King
Ang Lee's "Life of Pi" won four VES Awards at the 11th Visual Effects Society Awards on Tuesday evening at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. "Life of Pi" -- which is nominated for 11 Academy Awards, including best film and director -- won for visual effects in a visual effects-driven motion picture, animated character in a live action feature motion picture forĀ  Richard Parker, FX and simulation animation in a live action feature motion picture for the...
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