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Richard Egarr

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Partway through his recital of Mozart and Schubert violin sonatas with Andrew Manze in the Doheny Mansion at Mount St. Mary's College on Wednesday night, Richard Egarr stopped to describe his fortepiano. Sitting under the over-the-top Tiffany glass dome of the Pompeian Room and surrounded by a historical mishmash of paintings, antique furniture and figurines, the British pianist spoke of smooth and crunchy peanut butter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Rick Schultz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ever wonder what longhairs listen to when they let their hair down? Once upon a time, when conductors were regarded as remote intellectual titans, no one would have thought to ask. Marin Alsop, music director of the Baltimore Symphony, once described the archetypal image of a conductor as "this inaccessible person with an accent and an ascot. " All that has changed. At least since the 1960s, when Leonard Bernstein praised the Beatles and other pop groups, budding conductors have taken seriously the popular music of their day. And today's conductors don't care who knows it. One reason for the change in attitude is the Internet, which gives busy conductors easy access to different musical genres.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
British harpsichordist Richard Egarr is an early musiker who not only plays wonderfully, but also talks about music engagingly, as he did Friday at the Doheny Mansion, one of the stops in his first U.S. solo tour. Take the thorny subject of the old tuning systems, in which the distances between notes were inconsistent, as opposed to what Egarr jokingly called today's "communist system," in which distances are relatively equal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 9, 2007 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Partway through his recital of Mozart and Schubert violin sonatas with Andrew Manze in the Doheny Mansion at Mount St. Mary's College on Wednesday night, Richard Egarr stopped to describe his fortepiano. Sitting under the over-the-top Tiffany glass dome of the Pompeian Room and surrounded by a historical mishmash of paintings, antique furniture and figurines, the British pianist spoke of smooth and crunchy peanut butter.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The articulate, personable British harpsichordist Richard Egarr has appeared many times under the aegis of the Da Camera Society of Mount St. Mary's College's Chamber Music in Historic Sites series. He has performed by himself, in tandem with violinist Andrew Manze and as guest director of the Academy of Ancient Music -- always, as per the series' custom, in a different locale. Sunday afternoon, Egarr came back with the academy, but this time as its newly anointed music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
To say that Andrew Manze is a delightful violinist should, you would think, be qualification enough. Certainly anyone who enjoys witnessing expert violin playing would have been royally entertained at Manze's recital Thursday night in what the Southwestern University School of Law somewhat optimistically calls its Louis XVI Room. The concert was one in the series Chamber Music in Historic Sites, organized by the Da Camera Society of Mount St.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The little-known French Baroque composer Jean-Fery Rebel was known as a prodigious violinist and, as a composer, best remembered--though still only modestly--for his ballets. But a good case can be made for renewed attention to Rebel's chamber music, persuasively realized on this recording of violin sonatas by early music specialist Manze, with Egarr on harpsichord and gambist Linden.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2013 | By Rick Schultz, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Ever wonder what longhairs listen to when they let their hair down? Once upon a time, when conductors were regarded as remote intellectual titans, no one would have thought to ask. Marin Alsop, music director of the Baltimore Symphony, once described the archetypal image of a conductor as "this inaccessible person with an accent and an ascot. " All that has changed. At least since the 1960s, when Leonard Bernstein praised the Beatles and other pop groups, budding conductors have taken seriously the popular music of their day. And today's conductors don't care who knows it. One reason for the change in attitude is the Internet, which gives busy conductors easy access to different musical genres.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 2003 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
As Richard Egarr came to the end of his long harpsichord solo in Bach's Fifth Brandenburg Concerto, the audience broke into applause. People do that routinely at jazz concerts but not classical ones. They're supposed to hold their appreciation -- if they know the rules -- until the end of a piece. What was going on?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 2009 | Richard S. Ginell
This is the traditional June break here, the lull between the so-called winter and Hollywood Bowl seasons when the livin' is easy and the pickings are slim. Nevertheless, on Sunday beach-goers could have dropped in on an unusual event of note -- a performance of Handel's little-known but not lightly regarded oratorio "Theodora" -- at the Santa Monica First Presbyterian Church only a block from the palisades. It was a run-out concert for the Bach Collegium San Diego, a relatively new (2003)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2007 | Richard S. Ginell, Special to The Times
The articulate, personable British harpsichordist Richard Egarr has appeared many times under the aegis of the Da Camera Society of Mount St. Mary's College's Chamber Music in Historic Sites series. He has performed by himself, in tandem with violinist Andrew Manze and as guest director of the Academy of Ancient Music -- always, as per the series' custom, in a different locale. Sunday afternoon, Egarr came back with the academy, but this time as its newly anointed music director.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2006 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
British harpsichordist Richard Egarr is an early musiker who not only plays wonderfully, but also talks about music engagingly, as he did Friday at the Doheny Mansion, one of the stops in his first U.S. solo tour. Take the thorny subject of the old tuning systems, in which the distances between notes were inconsistent, as opposed to what Egarr jokingly called today's "communist system," in which distances are relatively equal.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
To say that Andrew Manze is a delightful violinist should, you would think, be qualification enough. Certainly anyone who enjoys witnessing expert violin playing would have been royally entertained at Manze's recital Thursday night in what the Southwestern University School of Law somewhat optimistically calls its Louis XVI Room. The concert was one in the series Chamber Music in Historic Sites, organized by the Da Camera Society of Mount St.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1999 | JOSEF WOODARD
The little-known French Baroque composer Jean-Fery Rebel was known as a prodigious violinist and, as a composer, best remembered--though still only modestly--for his ballets. But a good case can be made for renewed attention to Rebel's chamber music, persuasively realized on this recording of violin sonatas by early music specialist Manze, with Egarr on harpsichord and gambist Linden.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
The day it was released this month, Pierre-Laurent Aimard's recording of Bach's "Art of the Fugue" was the top-selling classical recording on iTunes. A week later, it debuted at No. 1 on Billboard's classical chart. The CD -- sublime performances of fathomless fugues from Bach's last days on Earth -- is exactly where it belongs. Troubled times call for deep and serious abstract art. Suddenly Bach's instrumental music is in huge demand.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2008 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
A repeat of its popular "Fall for Dance" festival and a dance gala featuring a dozen ballet stars, including Diana Vishneva, Angel Corella and Alina Cojocaru, will highlight the 2008-09 season at the Orange County Performing Artscenter. The second "Fall for Dance" festival, showcasing an eclectic, as yet unannounced lineup of companies, will run Oct. 2-5.
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