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Richard Elliot

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1994 | ZAN STEWART
Tenor sax player Richard Elliot, who performed with his band Saturday night at the Strand, may not sit on top of the pop instrumental sax heap, but he's close. A crowd pleaser, he tours about 120 days a year and sells lots of albums. But popularity and the ability to excite an audience don't necessarily translate into a musical experience that has impact.
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SPORTS
June 10, 2006
It was a relief to see the Mavericks send the Suns home for a long rest they surely needed. The most overachieving team in the NBA, the Suns played with what was virtually a six-man team at breakneck speed, 20 games in almost as many days. And without a 7-footer. Given a reasonable rest, they may have won it all. I take my hat off to so much fortitude. Steve Nash led them with heart and soul. Did any of the Lakers management watch? A team can't go far with a bloated ego as a leader.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Big commercial success has proved elusive for pop jazz saxophonist Richard Elliot, who shares a bill with Keiko Matsui on Sunday night as part of Humphrey's Concerts by the Bay. Elliot, 31, makes no bones about his calculated attempts to reach the largest possible audience, and his career was once ascending handsomely. The 1988 release "Take to the Skies" topped 80,000 in sales--not phenomenal compared with the millions sold by Kenny G, for example, but respectable.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1994 | ZAN STEWART
Tenor sax player Richard Elliot, who performed with his band Saturday night at the Strand, may not sit on top of the pop instrumental sax heap, but he's close. A crowd pleaser, he tours about 120 days a year and sells lots of albums. But popularity and the ability to excite an audience don't necessarily translate into a musical experience that has impact.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1992 | DON HECKMAN
* 1/2 Richard Elliot, "On the Town," Manhattan. Tenor saxophonist Elliot's quest for a laid-back, ballad-oriented outing founders on the shoals of a too-rigid rhythm section. Even the tracks that avoid the use of some sort of computer-sequenced rhythms are mechanical and hard-edged. A brief reading of "Over the Rainbow" at the close of the recording suggests that Elliot has a potential for warm expressiveness, but it's too little and too late.
SPORTS
June 10, 2006
It was a relief to see the Mavericks send the Suns home for a long rest they surely needed. The most overachieving team in the NBA, the Suns played with what was virtually a six-man team at breakneck speed, 20 games in almost as many days. And without a 7-footer. Given a reasonable rest, they may have won it all. I take my hat off to so much fortitude. Steve Nash led them with heart and soul. Did any of the Lakers management watch? A team can't go far with a bloated ego as a leader.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Richard Elliot was waiting backstage last week at the Arsenio Hall show. The hustle and bustle of television production enveloped him--ambient waves of sound from the audience and the band; a jungle of lights, cameras and technical equipment. It was an environment he had experienced many times before as a professional musician. But this time it was different.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
In a day when there is a profusion of up-and-coming able-bodied contemporary saxophonists in our midst--Sam Riney, Jim Honeyman, Steve Tavaglione, John Bolivar, Brandon Fields, Gary Meeks, Justo Almario and Mike Gealer, among them--what is it about Richard Elliot that sets him apart from the rest? For the 28-year-old horn man, the answer lies not so much in what he plays but in how he plays it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Elliot has a winning formula. The animated, pop-fired saxophonist knows just what to do to rouse his audience to appreciative ovations. That formula--accessible melodies, big but uncomplicated beats and an epic sense of drama--worked its magic at the Galaxy Concert Theatre on Thursday, moving the crowd to cheers and long stretches of hearty applause a number of times over the course of Elliot's 90-minute performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next to the human voice, the tenor saxophone has been the instrument of choice for creating rhythm-and-blues statements that touch the soul. And few have used the instrument as slickly for that purpose as one-time Tower of Power horn man Richard Elliot. There were any number of times Friday at the Coach House that Elliot's playing invited comparisons with vocalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 17, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Elliot has a winning formula. The animated, pop-fired saxophonist knows just what to do to rouse his audience to appreciative ovations. That formula--accessible melodies, big but uncomplicated beats and an epic sense of drama--worked its magic at the Galaxy Concert Theatre on Thursday, moving the crowd to cheers and long stretches of hearty applause a number of times over the course of Elliot's 90-minute performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Next to the human voice, the tenor saxophone has been the instrument of choice for creating rhythm-and-blues statements that touch the soul. And few have used the instrument as slickly for that purpose as one-time Tower of Power horn man Richard Elliot. There were any number of times Friday at the Coach House that Elliot's playing invited comparisons with vocalists.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 1993 | DON HECKMAN
* * 1/2 Richard Elliot, "Soul Embrace," Manhattan. The saxophonist deserves recognition for his ability as an appealing melodist. Most of these tunes--10 of which are originals--acknowledge that fact by allowing Elliot's sensuous tone to take center stage, buoyed by hypnotically repetitious dance rhythms. Less captivating is the inclusion of three vocals.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1991 | DIRK SUTRO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Big commercial success has proved elusive for pop jazz saxophonist Richard Elliot, who shares a bill with Keiko Matsui on Sunday night as part of Humphrey's Concerts by the Bay. Elliot, 31, makes no bones about his calculated attempts to reach the largest possible audience, and his career was once ascending handsomely. The 1988 release "Take to the Skies" topped 80,000 in sales--not phenomenal compared with the millions sold by Kenny G, for example, but respectable.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Richard Elliot was waiting backstage last week at the Arsenio Hall show. The hustle and bustle of television production enveloped him--ambient waves of sound from the audience and the band; a jungle of lights, cameras and technical equipment. It was an environment he had experienced many times before as a professional musician. But this time it was different.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
In a day when there is a profusion of up-and-coming able-bodied contemporary saxophonists in our midst--Sam Riney, Jim Honeyman, Steve Tavaglione, John Bolivar, Brandon Fields, Gary Meeks, Justo Almario and Mike Gealer, among them--what is it about Richard Elliot that sets him apart from the rest? For the 28-year-old horn man, the answer lies not so much in what he plays but in how he plays it.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 25, 1992 | ZAN STEWART
At My Place in Santa Monica, which has presented such top acts as the Manhattan Transfer and guitarist John Scofield, is closing its doors on Thursday, after 12 years of operation. Matt Kramer, who has served as artistic director since the room's inception, has decided to devote all his energies to his managerial career--he handles saxman Richard Elliot and singer-songwriter Renee Armand.
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