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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
An arrest warrant was issued Friday for a Westside auction house owner who disappeared in March and allegedly absconded with more than 1,000 artworks, antiques and decorative objects belonging to his clients. Police said many more items may be missing from the defunct Richard Eszterhazy Galleries at 926 N. La Cienega Blvd., making this the largest local art theft in memory in terms of volume. "I can't remember any other case we've had that was this large," said Detective William Martin, who has investigated art thefts since 1978.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1989 | TERRY PRISTIN, Times Staff Writer
An arrest warrant was issued Friday for a Westside auction house owner who disappeared in March and allegedly absconded with more than 1,000 artworks, antiques and decorative objects belonging to his clients. Police said many more items may be missing from the defunct Richard Eszterhazy Galleries at 926 N. La Cienega Blvd., making this the largest local art theft in memory in terms of volume. "I can't remember any other case we've had that was this large," said Detective William Martin, who has investigated art thefts since 1978.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1994 | SHAWN HUBLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than $1 million worth of stolen art and antiques--ranging from an 18th-Century harpsichord to paintings by Chagall and Matisse--were returned to Los Angeles police on Wednesday, five years after they disappeared from a La Cienega Boulevard gallery, police said. LAPD Detective Barbara Bella said the items had been missing since 1989, when Richard Eszterhazy--owner of the Richard Eszterhazy Galleries--closed up shop for a three-week vacation and never returned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1993 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Planning on stealing some art? Aim low. "The thieves who take the big name stuff get themselves in trouble," said Constance Lowenthal, executive director of the International Foundation for Art Research in New York. "It's too hard to sell it without arousing suspicions." That sage advice may have come too late for two San Fernando Valley men arrested Tuesday and charged with stealing nine paintings worth an estimated $9 million.
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