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Richard Feynman

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MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All these years gone, and Richard Feynman is still a force. dead more than a dozen years, but an icon nonetheless. Wander through the Caltech bookstore, and there he is, enshrined in a floor-to-ceiling photograph that takes up much of a wall. The only other prominent images in the store are those of Albert Einstein, and those are just posters.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2013 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Getting a dual American premiere Saturday, via Discovery and Science Channel, "The Challenger Disaster" is a BBC-made TV movie about physicist Richard Feynman (William Hurt) and the investigation into the causes of the 1986 space shuttle explosion. It is a kind of scientific "All the President's Men," including moody night scenes in the nation's capitol, microfiche, phone-booth calls and self-protecting sources guiding Feynman, who served on the commission convened to investigate the accident, toward the truth.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Physics is like sex," Richard Feynman once said, honing both his philosophic worldview and his pickup lines. "Sure, it has some practical results, but that's not why we do it." You don't hear that one in "QED," Peter Parnell's 1 1/2-person play now in its world premiere at the Mark Taper Forum. You hear many others, though.
BUSINESS
October 28, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
After reading my weekend column about the crisis in life science research, Hajime Hoji of USC's linguistics department reminded me of the late Richard Feynman's brilliant deconstruction of the flaws and pitfalls of science as it's done in the modern age. "Cargo Cult Science" was adapted from Feynman's 1974 commencement speech at Caltech, where his spirit reigns as one of that institution's two certified saints. (The other is Robert A. Millikan, Caltech's first president.)
BOOKS
November 1, 1992 | Thomas A. Bass, Bass is the author of "The Eudaemonic Pie" and "Camping With the Prince and Other Tales of Science in Africa."
Save for the beatified Einstein, few physicists have become famous. Robert Oppenheimer or Werner Heisenberg might be exceptions. But how many other physicists can we pick out of the serried ranks? Maybe one other--Richard Feynman, who won the requisite Nobel Prize and taught for many years at Cal Tech before becoming famous, first as a popular author and then as a member of the panel examining the Challenger space shuttle disaster in 1986.
MAGAZINE
April 20, 1986 | LAWRENCE GROBEL, Lawrence Grobel's book, "Conversations With Capote," has recently been published in paperback
One day last February, on a brightly lit stage in a large hall of the State Department in Washington, a distinguished panel of presidential appointees was conducting its investigation into the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger. The line of inquiry had turned to the effects that cold weather may have had on the launch.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 1994 | Kristine McKenna, Kristine McKenna is a frequent contributor to Calendar
Physicist Richard P. Feynman was just 24 when the U.S. government recruited him to help invent the atomic bomb. A graduate of Princeton, where he received his doctorate in 1942, Feynman was already a star in the science community, which was dazzled by his intuitive grasp of the complex outer reaches of physics. Skilled at feats of mental arithmetic that left his colleagues scratching their heads, Feynman seemed to do physics by ear.
NEWS
February 25, 1988
Two memorial services for Richard Feynman, the Caltech physicist and Nobel laureate who died Feb. 15, have been set for March 30 in Caltech's Beckman Auditorium. A school spokesman said administrators plan one service for students, faculty and staff and another later that day for the public. Meanwhile, a Richard Feynman Memorial Fund has been established, with proceeds going to cancer research. Contributions, payable to Caltech, may be sent to 105-40 Caltech, Pasadena, Calif. 91125.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1986
Three cheers for Richard Feynman! I knew it would be up to him to maintain a level of integrity and reason amidst NASA's bureaucratic nonsense. I think that every government commission should have at least one real, thinking person--just to balance things out. KEVIN LAUDERDALE Pasadena
MAGAZINE
January 18, 1987
I want to express my gratitude for the articles about such outstanding people as Richard Feynman, Sanford Sigoloff and, most recently, Milton Friedman--three of my contemporary heroes. I know of no other magazine that devotes itself to covering such persons of great achievement. Randall Davidson Hawthorne
BOOKS
May 22, 2005 | George Johnson, George Johnson's seventh book, "Miss Leavitt's Stars: The Untold Story of the Woman Who Discovered How to Measure the Universe," will be published in June.
A lot of money has been made from the literary estate of Richard P. Feynman, the Caltech physicist, Nobel laureate and performance artist, who stumbled into bestsellerdom in 1985 with a collection of anecdotes, transcribed from tape recordings, called "Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!" Three years later came a posthumous sequel, "What Do You Care What Other People Think?"
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
I was appalled when I discovered that, of the 100 California Nobel laureates listed in your excellent Nobel issue, only one was a woman ("Winner's Circle," by Debra J. Hotaling, Dec. 2). If extended as an average, that would suggest that only 1% of laureates are female. I noticed that this point was addressed, at least in part, by Michael T. Jarvis ("The Ones Who Got Away," Dec. 2). Perhaps they should come up with a new prize, the Nobelle. Celia Pearce Venice Kudos on your issue devoted to the Nobel winners; it's always inspiring to see scientists and thinkers praised.
MAGAZINE
December 2, 2001 | J. MICHAEL KENNEDY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
All these years gone, and Richard Feynman is still a force. dead more than a dozen years, but an icon nonetheless. Wander through the Caltech bookstore, and there he is, enshrined in a floor-to-ceiling photograph that takes up much of a wall. The only other prominent images in the store are those of Albert Einstein, and those are just posters.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2001
Jana J. Monji's article on "QED," the new play about the last days of the late, much-lamented Richard Feynman, contained a masterpiece of understatement: "Feynman later served on the Rogers Commission, investigating the explosion of the space shuttle Challenger" ("It's a Complex Equation," April 17). Served??!! He broke the case! Who can forget the TV hearings, with Feynman sitting among the bunch of ignorants and stuffed shirts, some of whom were reportedly anxious to cover up the tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | JANA J. MONJI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When she was a teenager, Michelle Feynman remembers playing a very Hollywood game--casting the story of her life. She picked Alan Alda to play her father. Alda is doing just that in the world premiere of Peter Parnell's "QED" at the Mark Taper Forum. Michelle's father, Richard Feynman, wasn't an ordinary man--he had worked on the Manhattan Project and was awarded the Nobel Prize for physics in 1965 for his research in quantum electrodynamics, or QED.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 2001 | MICHAEL PHILLIPS, TIMES THEATER CRITIC
"Physics is like sex," Richard Feynman once said, honing both his philosophic worldview and his pickup lines. "Sure, it has some practical results, but that's not why we do it." You don't hear that one in "QED," Peter Parnell's 1 1/2-person play now in its world premiere at the Mark Taper Forum. You hear many others, though.
MAGAZINE
January 6, 2002
I was appalled when I discovered that, of the 100 California Nobel laureates listed in your excellent Nobel issue, only one was a woman ("Winner's Circle," by Debra J. Hotaling, Dec. 2). If extended as an average, that would suggest that only 1% of laureates are female. I noticed that this point was addressed, at least in part, by Michael T. Jarvis ("The Ones Who Got Away," Dec. 2). Perhaps they should come up with a new prize, the Nobelle. Celia Pearce Venice Kudos on your issue devoted to the Nobel winners; it's always inspiring to see scientists and thinkers praised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1992
Moore's article claims that over 75% of all college students have cheated at least once. I have no reason to doubt that statement. Another statement by the author, however, is hard to accept. In that one he blames student cheating on schools' requirement for boring subjects, professors who are uninspiring and professors who signal "students that they have little to lose by cheating." First, it seems impossible to make every subject appealing to every student. Next, no one should expect every professor to be a Richard Feynman or Carl Sagan.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 2001 | JAN BRESLAUER, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Alan Alda is perched on the edge of a couch, getting fired up about photons. "A photon, a particle of light, bounces off a mirror and goes to your eye; it's clearly going from the lamp to the mirror to your eye," he says, gesticulating with sweater-clad arms flying, blue eyes flashing with puckish delight, as he pokes at several random points in space, including one perilously close to a reporter's eye.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 24, 2000 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
The Mark Taper Forum has announced a 2000-01 season that will feature a wide range of contemporary work. August Wilson's latest play, "King Hedley II" (Sept. 14-Oct. 22), will follow in the wake of his first play, "Jitney," which closed at the Taper last weekend. Part of Wilson's series of plays set in different decades, "King Hedley II" is set in 1985 in the same Pittsburgh neighborhood where "Jitney" took place.
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