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Richard Fleischer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2006
Director Richard Fleischer, who made such films as "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," "The Boston Strangler," "Tora! Tora! Tora!" and "Soylent Green," died at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, it was announced late Saturday. Fleischer was 89. A full obituary will appear in Monday's Times.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The film noir universe isn't pretty, with its antiheroes who have chips on their shoulders and scores to settle and those beautiful but duplicitous women who wrap the men around their little fingers. It's a world of crime, lust, love and murder. And it's an addictive universe. Hollywood kept returning to the noir well in the 1940s and 1950s — audiences, it seemed, couldn't get enough of these tawdry, atmospheric crime thrillers. Warner Home Video has come up with eight mouthwatering examples for its Film Noir Classic Collection Vol. 5, released this month on DVD. Here are highlights: 'Cornered' Dick Powell was best known in the 1930s as the jovial musical comedy star of such films as "42nd Street" and "Flirtation Walk."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Richard Fleischer picked up the phone more than half a century ago and was stunned. Walt Disney was on the line, asking him to direct "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea." "You do know who I am?" Fleischer recalled asking. His father, animation pioneer Max Fleischer, who created Betty Boop and popularized Popeye, was a bitter rival of Disney's. Even though the Disney name was not spoken in their home, Fleischer's father told him the opportunity was too important to pass up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 2006 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Richard Fleischer picked up the phone more than half a century ago and was stunned. Walt Disney was on the line, asking him to direct "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea." "You do know who I am?" Fleischer recalled asking. His father, animation pioneer Max Fleischer, who created Betty Boop and popularized Popeye, was a bitter rival of Disney's. Even though the Disney name was not spoken in their home, Fleischer's father told him the opportunity was too important to pass up.
NEWS
September 7, 1993 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is the sound of one voice talking? In Hollywood, all too often, it is noisy self-promotion. The attractive thing about writing a memoir is that none of the people you criticize for being difficult gets the chance to respond--and if your memories are extensive enough you might even retire the field and preclude some nasty journalist from writing your biography. Memoirs, save those of the wonderfully frank, are commercial publishing's version of a vanity press.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1993 | ROBIN RAUZI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Fleischer has a kind word for everybody. Consider what he says about "Tyrannosaurus" Rex Harrison, who quit and rejoined the cast of "Doctor Dolittle" about five times before filming started: "I found him to be the most wonderful actor that I've ever had to work with. He was just great. . . . All our difficulties with Rex were before the picture." Or, Kirk Douglas, who insisted on being in the very center of every shot of "The Vikings": "He's difficult because he's challenging. .
NEWS
April 15, 1989
Mario Chiari, 79, Italian art director and costume designer, who was trained as an architect. After starting out in the theater, he began work in the film industry in 1940 and collaborated on many Italian and foreign films and on television productions. Some of the films he worked on include "Miracle in Milan," directed by Vittorio de Sica (1951); "I Vitelloni," by Federico Fellini (1953); "War and Peace," by King Vidor (1956); "The Bible," by John Huston (1966); and "Dr. Doolittle," by Richard Fleischer (1967)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2001
Hey! What will happen to the title of the movie I directed in 1967, "Doctor Dolittle"? It seems to have gotten lost in some kind of numbers games. All I see in the newspapers are ads for Eddie Murphy's "Dr. Dolittle 2" and articles and reviews comparing it with Eddie Murphy's "Dr. D1." The title of my "Doctor Dolittle," which starred Rex Harrison and won nine academy nominations and two Academy Awards, didn't have a number, so I guess it'll have to be referred to as number "0" from now on. To make matters somewhat more confusing, Kenneth Turan, in his review ("They're Not Quite House-Trained," June 22)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988
In reviewing the television program "Roger Rabbit and the Secrets of Toon Town" and attempting to correct some oversights he found in it, Charles Solomon commits some of his own (TV Review, Sept. 13). He credited "Anchors Aweigh" (1944) as one of the earlier movies to blend live action with animation. True, but perhaps it would have been more appropriate if he had credited my father, Max Fleischer, for not only inventing the Rotoscope, the process by which this is accomplished, but for using it so successfully for many years in his animated series "Out of the Inkwell" (1917)
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Director Sues Filmstar for Breach of Contract: Richard Fleischer and the Directors Guild of America sued Filmstar Inc., alleging that it failed to pay Fleischer in a "pay or play" agreement to direct a project called "Lost," which was abandoned for lack of financing. The Superior Court lawsuit alleges that Filmstar agreed Feb. 22, 1989, to pay Fleischer a guaranteed $600,000, later changed to $500,000, to be placed in escrow; 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2006
Director Richard Fleischer, who made such films as "20,000 Leagues Under the Sea," "The Boston Strangler," "Tora! Tora! Tora!" and "Soylent Green," died at the Motion Picture and Television Country House and Hospital in Woodland Hills, it was announced late Saturday. Fleischer was 89. A full obituary will appear in Monday's Times.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 2001
Hey! What will happen to the title of the movie I directed in 1967, "Doctor Dolittle"? It seems to have gotten lost in some kind of numbers games. All I see in the newspapers are ads for Eddie Murphy's "Dr. Dolittle 2" and articles and reviews comparing it with Eddie Murphy's "Dr. D1." The title of my "Doctor Dolittle," which starred Rex Harrison and won nine academy nominations and two Academy Awards, didn't have a number, so I guess it'll have to be referred to as number "0" from now on. To make matters somewhat more confusing, Kenneth Turan, in his review ("They're Not Quite House-Trained," June 22)
NEWS
September 7, 1993 | KAREN STABINER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What is the sound of one voice talking? In Hollywood, all too often, it is noisy self-promotion. The attractive thing about writing a memoir is that none of the people you criticize for being difficult gets the chance to respond--and if your memories are extensive enough you might even retire the field and preclude some nasty journalist from writing your biography. Memoirs, save those of the wonderfully frank, are commercial publishing's version of a vanity press.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 24, 1993 | ROBIN RAUZI, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Fleischer has a kind word for everybody. Consider what he says about "Tyrannosaurus" Rex Harrison, who quit and rejoined the cast of "Doctor Dolittle" about five times before filming started: "I found him to be the most wonderful actor that I've ever had to work with. He was just great. . . . All our difficulties with Rex were before the picture." Or, Kirk Douglas, who insisted on being in the very center of every shot of "The Vikings": "He's difficult because he's challenging. .
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | From United Press International
Director Sues Filmstar for Breach of Contract: Richard Fleischer and the Directors Guild of America sued Filmstar Inc., alleging that it failed to pay Fleischer in a "pay or play" agreement to direct a project called "Lost," which was abandoned for lack of financing. The Superior Court lawsuit alleges that Filmstar agreed Feb. 22, 1989, to pay Fleischer a guaranteed $600,000, later changed to $500,000, to be placed in escrow; 2.
NEWS
April 15, 1989
Mario Chiari, 79, Italian art director and costume designer, who was trained as an architect. After starting out in the theater, he began work in the film industry in 1940 and collaborated on many Italian and foreign films and on television productions. Some of the films he worked on include "Miracle in Milan," directed by Vittorio de Sica (1951); "I Vitelloni," by Federico Fellini (1953); "War and Peace," by King Vidor (1956); "The Bible," by John Huston (1966); and "Dr. Doolittle," by Richard Fleischer (1967)
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2010 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
The film noir universe isn't pretty, with its antiheroes who have chips on their shoulders and scores to settle and those beautiful but duplicitous women who wrap the men around their little fingers. It's a world of crime, lust, love and murder. And it's an addictive universe. Hollywood kept returning to the noir well in the 1940s and 1950s — audiences, it seemed, couldn't get enough of these tawdry, atmospheric crime thrillers. Warner Home Video has come up with eight mouthwatering examples for its Film Noir Classic Collection Vol. 5, released this month on DVD. Here are highlights: 'Cornered' Dick Powell was best known in the 1930s as the jovial musical comedy star of such films as "42nd Street" and "Flirtation Walk."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1988
In reviewing the television program "Roger Rabbit and the Secrets of Toon Town" and attempting to correct some oversights he found in it, Charles Solomon commits some of his own (TV Review, Sept. 13). He credited "Anchors Aweigh" (1944) as one of the earlier movies to blend live action with animation. True, but perhaps it would have been more appropriate if he had credited my father, Max Fleischer, for not only inventing the Rotoscope, the process by which this is accomplished, but for using it so successfully for many years in his animated series "Out of the Inkwell" (1917)
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