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Richard Ford

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August 9, 1987 | SUSAN SQUIRE
RICHARD FORD IS the kind of seamless Southern gentleman who can obscure even the most spontaneous irritation under a veil of polite charm. When a UCI undergraduate comes up to him, after his formal reading of what has clearly been a short story about one eventful night in a young boy's life, and says, "Mr. Ford, was that poetry or science fiction?" Ford answers the student slowly, seriously, without a smidgen of sarcasm. "No," he says in his mellifluous country drawl, "that was a short story."
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Caroly Kellogg
Richard Ford and Timothy Egan were named winners of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence at the American Library Assn.'s national conference on Sunday night. This is the second year of the awards. The fiction citation went to Ford for his novel "Canada. " The Pulitzer Prize-winning author grew up in Jackson, Miss., where his local library was important to him. “I got an introduction there to what books were, why books were important,” Ford said in a statement. Egan took the nonfiction award for “Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher,” his biography of photographer Edward Curtis, who was famous for his photographs of Native Americans.
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BOOKS
July 2, 1995 | R.J. Smith, R . J . Smith is a freelance writer living in Echo Park
A central dread of Frank Bascombe's life in Richard Ford's new novel, "Independence Day," is that his ex-wife has married an architect. Bascombe is a realtor, someone who by his own description sells dreams. But his ex has left him for somebody who builds them, and somehow manages to bring those dreams to life. The question of what makes a house a home, and a group of people a family, animates Ford's novel.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
When John Freeman, the editor of Granta, was setting up Sunday morning's panel discussion on “The Art of the Poetic Line,” he related an anecdote about an exchange between Billy Collins, the former U.S. poet laureate, and Richard Ford, the novelist. How come you novelists get all the credit and all the money, Collins supposedly asked Ford. “It's really hard, Billy,” Ford replied. “You've got to write all the way to end of the page, and all the way down.” Of course, the art of arranging poetic lines on a page -- complete with punctuation (or not)
BOOKS
June 10, 1990 | Richard Eder
In "Wildlife," an adolescent begins to grow up when his parents go into crisis. He is not ready to leave the nest but, ready or not, the nest threatens to leave him. It could be subtitled "The Year I Learned About Life." This is almost a genre in American fiction, and Richard Ford has written a controlled and sometimes moving example of it.
BOOKS
September 27, 1987 | Carolyn See
"Edna and I had started down from Kalispell," the narrator in Richard Ford's title story begins, "heading for Tampa-St. Pete where I had some friends from the old glory days who wouldn't turn me in to the police. . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | DAVID L. ULIN, BOOK CRITIC
It's tempting to call Richard Ford a writer of place. Beginning with his first novel, 1976's "A Piece of My Heart," the 68-year-old author has tended toward the border among landscape, language and character, using setting to help drive his narratives. Think of Frank Bascombe, who in "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day" and "The Lay of the Land" drifts across the bland surfaces of New Jersey, seeking not stimulation but a stasis similar to that of the suburbs where he resides.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It may be impossible for an author to achieve more acclaim than Toni Morrison, now 81, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993. Her work is "characterized by visionary force and poetic import," the Nobel Committee wrote, and we'll get more of it May 8, when her 10th novel is published. "Home" is the story of an angry African American veteran of the Korean War who returns, unhappily, to the Georgia community where he was raised. She's not the only Nobel Prize winner returning to shelves.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2013 | By Reed Johnson
When John Freeman, the editor of Granta, was setting up Sunday morning's panel discussion on “The Art of the Poetic Line,” he related an anecdote about an exchange between Billy Collins, the former U.S. poet laureate, and Richard Ford, the novelist. How come you novelists get all the credit and all the money, Collins supposedly asked Ford. “It's really hard, Billy,” Ford replied. “You've got to write all the way to end of the page, and all the way down.” Of course, the art of arranging poetic lines on a page -- complete with punctuation (or not)
NEWS
March 24, 2002
Regarding the March 8 City of Angles column: The item on novelist Richard Ford mentions an audience member taking exception to Ford's "lack of grammatical correctness in his new book (one story features a series of sentences that end in propositions) ..." Not yet being familiar with that particular story, I can only say that, if each sentence ends in a proposition, that potentially juicy story is the first I'll be turning to. Oh, excuse me, the first to which I'll be turning. LAURA DRABKIN Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
May 27, 2012 | DAVID L. ULIN, BOOK CRITIC
It's tempting to call Richard Ford a writer of place. Beginning with his first novel, 1976's "A Piece of My Heart," the 68-year-old author has tended toward the border among landscape, language and character, using setting to help drive his narratives. Think of Frank Bascombe, who in "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day" and "The Lay of the Land" drifts across the bland surfaces of New Jersey, seeking not stimulation but a stasis similar to that of the suburbs where he resides.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles Times
It may be impossible for an author to achieve more acclaim than Toni Morrison, now 81, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1993. Her work is "characterized by visionary force and poetic import," the Nobel Committee wrote, and we'll get more of it May 8, when her 10th novel is published. "Home" is the story of an angry African American veteran of the Korean War who returns, unhappily, to the Georgia community where he was raised. She's not the only Nobel Prize winner returning to shelves.
BOOKS
October 22, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
LET me be completely honest: I can't make up my mind about "The Lay of the Land." For the last few weeks, I've wrestled with it and have been alternately indifferent and enthralled.
BOOKS
January 25, 2004 | Richard Schickel, Richard Schickel writes the monthly "Film on Paper" column for Book Review. His latest book is "Woody Allen: A Life in Film," and his latest film is "Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin."
Here I am, on a rainy May afternoon in 1996, struggling out of a taxi on West 26th Street in Manhattan. I'm carrying an umbrella, a briefcase and a couple of changes of coat and tie. Needless to say, I don't have anything close to the correct change for the cabby; it takes a drenching while to complete our transaction.
NEWS
March 24, 2002
Regarding the March 8 City of Angles column: The item on novelist Richard Ford mentions an audience member taking exception to Ford's "lack of grammatical correctness in his new book (one story features a series of sentences that end in propositions) ..." Not yet being familiar with that particular story, I can only say that, if each sentence ends in a proposition, that potentially juicy story is the first I'll be turning to. Oh, excuse me, the first to which I'll be turning. LAURA DRABKIN Studio City
BOOKS
February 10, 2002 | JANE CIABATTARI
Richard Ford, who was raised in Mississippi and has spent a lot of time in Montana, where the standard obituary often ends, "and he was an avid hunter and fisherman," has hunted all his life.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2013 | By Caroly Kellogg
Richard Ford and Timothy Egan were named winners of the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence at the American Library Assn.'s national conference on Sunday night. This is the second year of the awards. The fiction citation went to Ford for his novel "Canada. " The Pulitzer Prize-winning author grew up in Jackson, Miss., where his local library was important to him. “I got an introduction there to what books were, why books were important,” Ford said in a statement. Egan took the nonfiction award for “Short Nights of the Shadow Catcher,” his biography of photographer Edward Curtis, who was famous for his photographs of Native Americans.
BOOKS
October 22, 2006 | David L. Ulin, David L. Ulin is book editor of The Times.
LET me be completely honest: I can't make up my mind about "The Lay of the Land." For the last few weeks, I've wrestled with it and have been alternately indifferent and enthralled.
BOOKS
November 15, 1998 | MICHAEL HENRY HEIM, Michael Henry Heim has translated Chekhov's major plays, a collection of his letters ("Anton Chekhov's Life and Thought"), and Henri Troyat's biography, "Chekhov." He teaches in the department of Slavic languages and literatures at UCLA
"Chekhovian" may not roll off the tongue as easily as "Kafkaesque," yet in its way it is every bit as evocative of how we construe the 20th century. (Ironically, Chekhov and Kafka died of the quintessentially 19th century illness, consumption; they were both in their early 40s.
BOOKS
October 18, 1998 | JENNY UGLOW, Jenny Uglow is the editorial director of Chatto & Windus and a biographer and critic whose most recent book is "Hogarth: A Life and a World."
In one of Eudora Welty's early stories, "A Memory," a young girl lies by a lake. She sees the scene before her as if it were a picture or a brightly lit stage. The noon sun beats down, the water shines like steel: "I was looking at a rectangle brightly lit, actually glaring at me, with sun, sand, water, a little pavilion, a few solitary people in fixed attitudes, and around it all a border of dark rounded oak trees, like the engraved thunderclouds surrounding illustrations in the Bible."
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