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Richard G Darman

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NEWS
May 2, 1990
In response to "Taxicab Driver Appearance Guidelines," Metro, April 19: The Times is quite right, the lot of the city's taxi drivers is indeed tough. The new dress code requirement, however, will make it brighter by giving the courteous, well-dressed cabbie renewed self-respect, gratitude from the taxi-riding public and by all indications higher gratuities. NATHAN L. CHROMAN President, Transportation Commission City of Los Angeles
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BUSINESS
January 19, 1993 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To its legion of critics, the Bush Administration economic team has always been something of an oxymoron: It never did much about the economy, and it certainly never acted like a team. Now, as the Administration's economic advisers pack up to make way for Bill Clinton's replacements, conservatives are accusing them of engineering George Bush's defeat by bungling key policy decisions and sometimes putting their own agendas above the President's. Yet as outgoing Budget Director Richard G.
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NEWS
September 14, 1992 | From Times staff writers
SECOND CHANCE: The biggest beneficiary of Baker's return is said to be Budget Director Richard G. Darman, a man routinely vilified by conservatives who contend he bears major responsibility for Bush's political woes. "He's in all the meetings." one White House official said of Darman. "And when he talks, everybody pays attention."
NEWS
October 26, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The choice of advisers is of no little import to a prince; and they are good or not, according to the wisdom of the prince.
NEWS
January 24, 1989
The Senate Governmental Affairs Committee unanimously approved Richard G. Darman to be White House budget director as Darman hinted that President Bush's own budget proposals will not differ substantially from those presented earlier this month by the outgoing Reagan Administration. Darman's nomination is expected to be approved by the full Senate on Wednesday. In his second day of testimony before the committee, Darman provided few new details of what Bush will propose.
NEWS
August 15, 1989
The White House, reluctant to pick a public fight with the Federal Reserve Board, offered only lukewarm endorsement for the call by Budget Director Richard G. Darman for lower interest rates to sustain economic growth. White House Press Secretary Marlin Fitzwater refused to echo the comment Darman made Sunday on the NBC News program "Meet the Press" that the Fed should stop worrying about inflation and "be more attentive to the need to avoid tipping this economy into recession."
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
DARMAN UNDER FIRE: Divisions inside the Bush White House are deepening. Among the causes are the intensifying debate over next year's federal budget and the issue of health care reform. When the White House last week stopped the presses on the budget, the clear loser was Budget Director Richard G. Darman. The action was taken to remove a Darman-backed provision to begin taxing health care benefits received by highly paid employees.
NEWS
November 26, 1989 | From Reuters
Although the Bush Administration is not looking at any tax increases next year, Budget Director Richard G. Darman refused Saturday to rule out the possibility if further cuts in the budget deficit are not achieved. On CNN's "Evans & Novak" program, Darman made it clear that he intended to reduce the deficit without a tax increase and said that raising taxes was "not on the table." However, he did not rule out the possibility.
NEWS
April 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Health and Human Services Secretary Louis W. Sullivan, responding to criticism from Budget Director Richard G. Darman, ordered public health officials Friday to revise a survey that would probe the sexual lives of thousands of Americans. Sullivan said he was acting to ensure that the federal government does not inappropriately intrude into the most personal aspects of citizens' lives, while balancing the need to gain a better understanding of how the deadly AIDS virus is being spread.
NEWS
January 20, 1989 | TOM REDBURN, Times Staff Writer
Watch out America, here comes the "duck test." Richard G. Darman, President-elect Bush's incoming budget director, told a Senate committee Thursday that Bush's pledge against higher taxes covered not only higher income taxes, but also efforts to eliminate tax deductions or raise excise taxes. Bush "meant no new taxes as it would ordinarily be understood by ordinary Americans," Darman said. "I think the burden of that is the duck test--if it looks like a duck, it's a duck."
NEWS
October 13, 1992 | DOUGLAS JEHL and JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Scrambling to persuade voters that President Bush is serious about changing course on the economy, the White House signaled Monday that Bush plans to dismiss his controversial economic policy team if reelected. Senior White House officials indicated Monday that the President's top economic advisers--Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady, Budget Director Richard G. Darman and chief economist Michael J. Boskin--will be replaced if there is a second Bush term next January.
NEWS
September 14, 1992 | From Times staff writers
SECOND CHANCE: The biggest beneficiary of Baker's return is said to be Budget Director Richard G. Darman, a man routinely vilified by conservatives who contend he bears major responsibility for Bush's political woes. "He's in all the meetings." one White House official said of Darman. "And when he talks, everybody pays attention."
NEWS
August 15, 1992 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the fall of 1990, Budget Director Richard G. Darman chuckled to reporters about how he had snookered the Democrats in hammering out a five-year budget agreement between the White House and Congress. For the first time, Darman said, Congress would be unable to pass new initiatives requiring fresh federal spending unless they either made cuts in other areas or found new sources of revenue to cover the cost. The result, according to Darman and Treasury Secretary Nicholas F.
NEWS
May 7, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
White House Budget Director Richard G. Darman on Wednesday praised congressional efforts to pass a constitutional amendment requiring a balanced budget, and said that adopting President Bush's economic plan together with a cap on spending growth for mandatory benefits could produce a federal budget surplus in five years.
NEWS
February 3, 1992 | From The Times' Washington staff
DARMAN UNDER FIRE: Divisions inside the Bush White House are deepening. Among the causes are the intensifying debate over next year's federal budget and the issue of health care reform. When the White House last week stopped the presses on the budget, the clear loser was Budget Director Richard G. Darman. The action was taken to remove a Darman-backed provision to begin taxing health care benefits received by highly paid employees.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1991 | From Reuters
The economy began to recover from recession in May, but not as vigorously as the Bush Administration wants, White House Budget Director Richard Darman said Sunday. "I think the economy turned in May," Darman said on ABC television's "This Week with David Brinkley," citing increased housing starts and industrial production as evidence that the economy is continuing to grow. "But the question is whether it's going to stay up and whether it's going to come up strongly," Darman said.
BUSINESS
February 7, 1990 | TOM REDBURN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Treasury Secretary Nicholas F. Brady, attempting to mollify lawmakers on one of the most contentious issues dividing the Bush Administration and Congress, said Tuesday that the White House will not propose to hide off-budget the extra $40 billion to $100 billion in temporary borrowing needed to help finance the costly savings and loan cleanup operation.
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