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Richard Gadd

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NEWS
April 3, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A Central Intelligence Agency helicopter illegally delivered at least one cargo of plastic explosives to rebels inside Nicaragua last year, according to an American crewman aboard the flight and two other sources. Their account is the first confirmed report of a direct violation by CIA employees of the Boland Amendment, which prohibited the agency from providing weaponry to the contras from late 1984 through late 1986.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2001 | PHILIP KENNICOTT, WASHINGTON POST
After more than four decades, a new man is at the helm of the Santa Fe Opera House, which houses this country's premier summer opera festival. Richard Gaddes--a protege of the company's founder and longtime general director, John Crosby--is leading the company through its first season of the post-Crosby years. It is a typical Santa Fe season: a couple of hits, some near-misses and only one real dog.
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NEWS
April 6, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The hours before the mission had been tense, with arguments in smoke-filled rooms in San Salvador and anxious telephone calls to the controllers in Washington. And as the Southern Air Transport cargo plane made its secret night crossing into the forbidden black airspace of Nicaragua, in the cockpit tension rose again. But ahead in the jungle blazed a line of primitive beacons--three hilltops on fire--and behind them, brilliantly lit, the Nicaraguan rebels' "drop zone."
NEWS
April 6, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The hours before the mission had been tense, with arguments in smoke-filled rooms in San Salvador and anxious telephone calls to the controllers in Washington. And as the Southern Air Transport cargo plane made its secret night crossing into the forbidden black airspace of Nicaragua, in the cockpit tension rose again. But ahead in the jungle blazed a line of primitive beacons--three hilltops on fire--and behind them, brilliantly lit, the Nicaraguan rebels' "drop zone."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 15, 2001 | PHILIP KENNICOTT, WASHINGTON POST
After more than four decades, a new man is at the helm of the Santa Fe Opera House, which houses this country's premier summer opera festival. Richard Gaddes--a protege of the company's founder and longtime general director, John Crosby--is leading the company through its first season of the post-Crosby years. It is a typical Santa Fe season: a couple of hits, some near-misses and only one real dog.
NEWS
March 18, 1987 | Associated Press
The Senate and House committees investigating the Iran- contra scandal voted today to hold all hearings jointly and agreed to a timetable for granting limited immunity to former national security adviser John M. Poindexter and his deputy, Oliver L. North, while delaying their public testimony until June. The agreement between the congressional panels and the government's special prosecutor was approved during closed-door meetings of the two committees, their chairmen said.
NEWS
August 28, 1990 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eugene Hasenfus, who says his life has been on a steady downward slide since being shot down by a Sandinista rocket in 1986 while taking part in the illegal Contra resupply operation, was shot down again here Monday by a federal district court jury considering his claims for back pay and legal fees. After five weeks of testimony and five days of deliberation, the six-member panel found Iran-Contra figure Richard V.
NEWS
April 14, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
Newly discovered bank records suggest that at least $1.5 million in profits from the Reagan Administration's secret arms sales to Iran were used to buy and service airplanes for the Nicaraguan rebels, investigators said Monday. The bank records show that a Swiss company that is believed to have handled money from the Iranian arms deal transferred funds to a dummy company in Panama, which then paid for planes for the contras ' secret airlift, they said.
NEWS
March 19, 1987 | KAREN TUMULTY, Times Staff Writer
The Senate panel investigating the Iran- contra scandal voted Wednesday to hold retired Maj. Gen. Richard V. Secord in contempt for failing to respond to a subpoena of bank records, starting a process that could leave Secord with the choice of handing over the documents or going to jail. Secord, who reportedly ran a private supply network for the Nicaraguan rebels, is believed to be a key player in the sale of U.S. arms to Iran and diversion of profits to the contras.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | RONALD J. OSTROW, Times Staff Writer
Despite the outpouring of public support for former White House aide Oliver L. North, there is no doubt that independent counsel Lawrence E. Walsh will seek to indict him and other principals in the Iran- contra case, sources familiar with Walsh's probe said Wednesday. Now that the congressional investigating committees have concluded their public hearings, the spotlight is shifting to Walsh's effort to bring criminal charges.
NEWS
April 3, 1987 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
A Central Intelligence Agency helicopter illegally delivered at least one cargo of plastic explosives to rebels inside Nicaragua last year, according to an American crewman aboard the flight and two other sources. Their account is the first confirmed report of a direct violation by CIA employees of the Boland Amendment, which prohibited the agency from providing weaponry to the contras from late 1984 through late 1986.
NEWS
March 7, 1989 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, Times Staff Writer
Lt. Col. Oliver L. North told a retired Air Force officer who helped him resupply Nicaragua's rebels that "someday the President will shake your hand," the officer told a federal court jury Monday. Retired Col. Robert C. Dutton said that North made the remark to him in September, 1986, after Dutton had solved tactical problems that prevented the Contras from receiving airdrops of weapons and medical supplies purchased with private donations.
NEWS
June 19, 1987 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
Members of Congress on Thursday challenged Lt. Col. Oliver L. North, key figure in the Iran- contra scandal, to cooperate with the congressional investigating committees if he hopes to retain his image as "the pillar of patriotism." Committee members rejected North's reasons for refusing to be questioned privately by the committee staff before his scheduled public testimony in mid-July.
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