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Richard Gillespie

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NEWS
April 21, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Gillespie admits he didn't set out to find Amelia Earhart's airplane. All he wanted was to take his interest in the discovery and recovery of historic aircraft, to move the whole field out of its "grave-digger-treasure-hunter stage, and develop this fledgling science of aviation archeology as a genuine academic discipline."
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NEWS
April 21, 1992 | LEWIS BEALE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard Gillespie admits he didn't set out to find Amelia Earhart's airplane. All he wanted was to take his interest in the discovery and recovery of historic aircraft, to move the whole field out of its "grave-digger-treasure-hunter stage, and develop this fledgling science of aviation archeology as a genuine academic discipline."
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NEWS
March 30, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Gillespie and his East Coast cluster of engineers and archeologists say they have found a patch of aluminum torn from Amelia Earhart's airplane. Mystery solved. Case closed. Conclusively, finally and overwhelmingly. Yet Elgen Long and his West Coast clutch of mechanics and metallurgists say Gillespie's artifact is fiction. Not by any stretch of measurement or the imagination, they claim, could the piece be from Earhart's airplane. The case remains wide open.
NEWS
March 30, 1992 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Gillespie and his East Coast cluster of engineers and archeologists say they have found a patch of aluminum torn from Amelia Earhart's airplane. Mystery solved. Case closed. Conclusively, finally and overwhelmingly. Yet Elgen Long and his West Coast clutch of mechanics and metallurgists say Gillespie's artifact is fiction. Not by any stretch of measurement or the imagination, they claim, could the piece be from Earhart's airplane. The case remains wide open.
NEWS
March 18, 1992 | From Associated Press
The man in charge of assembling Amelia Earhart's plane said Tuesday that a piece of fuselage found on a remote atoll couldn't possibly have come from the famed aviator's sleek Lockheed Electra. "Not even close," said Ed Werner, who compared the dimensions and shape of the piece of aluminum with a duplicate of Earhart's plane at the Western Aerospace Museum in Oakland.
MAGAZINE
September 22, 1991 | Bill Manson, EDITED BY MARY McNAMARA
Russell Matthews, 23, lives in Hollywood and wants to direct adventure movies. But the adventure he's on now beats any script. During October, Matthews and 15 others will search the atoll of Nikumaroro, a desert island in the South Pacific, for the remains of aviator Amelia Earhart, who disappeared on July 2, 1937, on her pioneering round-the-world flight.
BUSINESS
April 16, 1998 | GREG JOHNSON
In the late 1950s, Wham-O's Frisbee print ads had to describe what the new toy was--and, unbelievably--how it worked. Advertising copy for the flying disc that began life as the "Pluto Platter" included lines such as "flies like a plane" and "America's favorite game of catch." Wham-O also flooded America with Hula-Hoops during the late 1950s. When the toy was reintroduced in the late 1960s, Wham-O pitched it as "ready for the new generation."
NEWS
July 30, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international airplane recovery group known for its exhaustive yet controversial search for a piece of Amelia Earhart's airplane is poised to study the plane wrecks in Ventura County's Los Padres National Forest for historical significance. Officials of the U. S.
NEWS
December 9, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN and DANICA KIRKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Trash trucks from around the city are expected to converge today and Sunday on the San Fernando Valley, which missed a pickup after Wednesday's mid-city accident that claimed the lives of two boys. The delays occurred when the city decided to inspect trash trucks similar to the one whose mechanical rod malfunctioned and rammed a school bus. Trash pickup in much of the city is already back on schedule. Some areas, such as South-Central Los Angeles, are expected to be on schedule by today.
NEWS
January 4, 1991 | Associated Press
Amateur aircraft sleuths speculated Thursday that a metal cabinet found on a remote South Pacific island is from the plane of aviator Amelia Earhart, who has been missing since 1937. Although the investigators acknowledged that the evidence is strictly circumstantial, an FBI expert said he found nothing "which would disqualify this artifact as having come from the Earhart aircraft." He said the paint on the metal bookcase is "consistent with the materials that were being used" in 1937.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 30, 1992 | TINA DAUNT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An international airplane recovery group, known for its exhaustive yet controversial search for a piece of Amelia Earhart's airplane, is poised to study the plane wrecks in Ventura County's Los Padres National Forest for historical significance. Officials of the U. S.
NEWS
January 5, 1997 | BRUCE STANLEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A jagged scrap of aluminum is probably old enough to have come from Amelia Earhart's last flight, preliminary tests have found, supporting a theory that she landed on an island before vanishing 59 years ago. But metals experts at the Alcoa Technical Center near Pittsburgh could not determine the relic's exact age. "We can't say it's Amelia's, but we can't say it's not from that time period," Victor Zadnik, a chemist at the center, said.
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