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Richard Gladstein

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BUSINESS
January 28, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER
In bringing a sprawling novel to the big screen, surely the last thing a filmmaker would want is for the book's author to adapt the material. Novelists work alone and aren't used to collaborating about characters and plot points or to whittling their prose. But producer Richard Gladstein said condensing the best-selling 800-page novel "The Cider House Rules" into a 136-page screenplay during a five-year collaboration with celebrated author John Irving was anything but gut-wrenching.
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BUSINESS
January 28, 2000 | CLAUDIA ELLER
In bringing a sprawling novel to the big screen, surely the last thing a filmmaker would want is for the book's author to adapt the material. Novelists work alone and aren't used to collaborating about characters and plot points or to whittling their prose. But producer Richard Gladstein said condensing the best-selling 800-page novel "The Cider House Rules" into a 136-page screenplay during a five-year collaboration with celebrated author John Irving was anything but gut-wrenching.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2005 | John Horn and Chris Lee, Special to The Times
And the best picture nomination goes to -- well, we'll get back to you. The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has announced the year's five best picture nominees. But it hasn't yet resolved who will be credited with producing three of them. In an effort to curtail the pileup of producers swarming the stage to collect the top Oscar, the academy now limits the number of people who can claim to have made the film to three.
NEWS
August 26, 1998 | BILL HIGGINS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Scene: Monday's premiere of Miramax's "54." The tale of Manhattan's late-'70s hothouse of hedonism--the Studio 54 disco--screened at Mann's Chinese theater.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2007 | Josh Getlin, Times Staff Writer
The deal Actress Jessica Biel options the film rights to Edgar-nominated writer Megan Abbott's "Die a Little," a Los Angeles noir novel set in the 1950s with an intriguing character twist. The players Biel (recently in "I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry") and her producing partner, Michelle Purple, sign an option for a film set up at United Artists that also includes screenwriters Geoffrey and Marcia Blake and producer Richard Gladstein.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
Not to be glib, but sitting through the art-centric chamber piece "The Time Being" is truly like watching paint dry. This airless tale of struggling artist Daniel (Wes Bentley), who submits to a humiliating series of work assignments by a dying, mysterious recluse named Warner (Frank Langella), attempts to plumb the emotional depths of this pair of tortured souls yet never sufficiently makes us care about either. Director Nenad Cicin-Sain, who co-wrote with veteran producer Richard N. Gladstein, takes a style over substance approach, filling his frames with an abundance of gorgeously lit and composed images (kudos to cinematographer Mihai Malaimare)
OPINION
June 6, 2011 | By Scott Martelle
On the first Monday morning of June 1951, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 22-page majority decision that, for the next six years, did the unfathomable here in the land of the free: It effectively outlawed a specific political belief. Sixty years later, that ruling stands as an object lesson in how the U.S. government should not react to stressful times by clamping down on the freedoms that define our democracy. The case was Dennis vs. United States, and it began with a bungled investigation into Soviet spy rings.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2001 | SHAUNA SNOW
POP/ROCK Starting the Comeback Trail?: Michael Jackson will reunite in concert with his brothers in the Jackson 5 for the first time since the 1980s during a Sept. 7 all-star Madison Square Garden show that will be taped for broadcast as a two-hour TV special. Jackson, who hasn't performed live in the United States in 15 years, will perform solo, in duets with Whitney Houston and Britney Spears, and with his brothers Jackie, Tito, Marlon, Jermaine and Randy, producer David Gest said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1995 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Sean Penn brings the same visceral intensity and raw emotionality to writing and directing as he does to acting, and while that may sound like a good thing, it finally isn't. "The Crossing Guard," Penn's second film behind the camera, is a troubling, troublesome movie whose makeshift structure cannot contain the powerful flood of passions that he and his cast have poured into it.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2000 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Robert Altman's 1975 masterpiece "Nashville" is finally making its DVD debut (Paramount, $30). And this sprawling dark comedy about America is just as sharp and provocative today as it was 25 years ago. Written by Joan Tewkesbury, "Nashville" follows the intersecting lives of 24 people in the country music capital over a five-day period, culminating at a rally for a third-party presidential candidate.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1994
Regarding "A Chat With Mr. Mayhem," by Hilary de Vries (Sept. 11): How unfortunate it is to read that Quentin Tarantino sees himself as a maker of "great films," yet he knocks Oliver Stone for attempting to inject some much-needed social resonance into the tired veins of his original script for "Natural Born Killers." If one cuts out what Stone contributed to the film, all that's left is a droll one-act journey of cult film iconoclasm. Then Tarantino tries to tell us that Americans can't tell stories anymore.
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