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Richard Goldsmith

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NEWS
December 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Lawyers for Latino workers and labor unions on Tuesday praised a federal judge's ruling limiting immigration agents' authority to enter a workplace and look for illegal aliens. "This prohibits raids by the preferred method the Immigration and Naturalization Service uses, which is to obtain a general, open-ended warrant . . . to name one or two individuals and then to arrest, en masse, the entire workplace," said Francisco Garcia of the Mexican-American Legal Defense and Educational Fund. U.S.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1998 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
Warner Bros. got even with critics for a year's worth of negative reviews last week when it compelled them to see "Jack Frost" on a Saturday morning. "We're going to make you see it with children," a publicist said, with a detectable note of glee. Fair enough. But if the movie is to be reviewed as a total experience, yours and an auditorium filled with kids, then we must report both reactions. Not much.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1993 | JILL LEOVY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
This year Jared White, an English-speaking 6-year-old from West Hills, has had to do what Spanish-speaking children in Los Angeles have done for generations: Attend school in a language he didn't understand. At first, said his mother, Barbara White, it was tough going. But she and others who have enrolled their children in Hamlin Street School's language academy believe the effort will pay off. "The world is changing, the marketplace in the future will value languages. . . .
BUSINESS
June 11, 1998 | MARLA MATZER
Size does matter when it comes to getting product prominently featured in the aisles of retailers such as Target, Toys R Us and FAO Schwarz. At this week's Licensing '98 trade show, the increased cost of gaining prime shelf space in top stores was a hot topic of conversation. Licensors realize that no matter how much effort they put behind production and design, it doesn't amount to much if the merchandise never reaches consumers.
NEWS
July 23, 1992 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, Corinne Flocken is a free-lance writer who regularly covers Kid Stuff for The Times Orange County Edition.
From a pack of nasty-looking alligators to a Great White Rhino named Thor, some frighteningly unpredictable critters have been lured into the center ring by the folks at Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. But with the 122nd edition (which continues through Tuesday at the Anaheim Convention Center), circus organizers are after even more elusive game: the American Adolescent. In a bid to attract teens and pre-teens, Ringling Bros.
BUSINESS
December 24, 1997 | MARLA MATZER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"The Big Comfy Couch" is a sweet half-hour public TV show for preschoolers. The main characters are a young clown and her doll--both sporting bulbous red noses--who perform skits designed to help youngsters develop physical and emotional skills. Some people call it the "Barney" of Canada, where it originated. Gentle appearances aside, "Couch" competes in one of the most competitive and difficult arenas in show business, according to Richard Goldsmith, the man who turned the program into a U.S.
FOOD
June 27, 1985 | CAROLE SUGARMAN, The Washington Post
Labels cover a multitude of sins when it comes to the packaging and marketing of national brands, store brands and generics. If food manufacturers were asked to "bare all," there'd be a lot of embarrassed advertisers--and a lot of surprised consumers. Product swapping, label switching and recipe imitating are common among manufacturers and packers. The result is a marketplace of products that may be more alike--or, depending on your viewpoint, more different--than one might think.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
They're coming! They're coming! They're . . . here! For whatever the reason, Hollywood is abuzz about Outer Space Chic. Alien invader movies--which blasted off in the '50s, slumped in the '60s, and enjoyed a brief revival during the Steven Spielberg Regime (1977-1982)--are back again. Something is definitely in the air: Morton Downey Jr. recently revealed that he was once visited--perhaps even briefly abducted--by alien visitors (the New York Post headline: "Spaced Out With Mort!").
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