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Richard Goode

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ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Though connoisseurs long ago discovered him, Richard Goode remains a decidedly unfamous pianist. Yet, as he proved again Monday night, the New York-born musician, known among his cult for a deep and wide repertory and for having recorded all 32 of Beethoven's piano sonatas, deserves a place among the elite.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Because of his formidable presence in certain parts of the repertory -- Beethoven and Schubert come immediately to mind -- Richard Goode's versatility has sometimes been overlooked. Yet over the years this great American pianist has shown us the breadth of his interests most convincingly. Bach was the subject Wednesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall when Goode returned to Los Angeles to please, thrill and titillate a roomful of enthusiastic followers.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1989 | ALBERT GOLDBERG
As the active concert repertory dwindles almost from day to day for lack of nourishing replenishment, the opportunities for performing specialization likewise shrinks apace. Richard Goode, the American-born and trained pianist who played a Beethoven recital in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion on Monday night, may resent this categorization, for he does on occasion indeed play music other than Beethoven.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 2, 2004 | Mark Swed, Times Staff Writer
Richard Goode has two centers of gravity, and you couldn't miss either one the moment he began his impressive UCLA Live recital at Royce Hall on Wednesday night. The first is physical. Once he touches the keyboard, his weight seems concentrated in his hands. Raising his fingers looks like a major effort. When he does so, it's with a tense, sudden jerk. Goode's other center of gravity is musical. He plays as though Beethoven was at the core of his art and his ideas about the piano.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Extraordinary pianism was the order of the weekend at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. Friday night, Robert McDonald, assisting violinist Midori in a memorable recital (reviewed Monday), restored respect for the sometimes dimming occupation of "collaborative artist." And Sunday, in a joint appearance with soprano, Dawn Upshaw, Richard Goode proved again that a gang of equals beats any other musical combination.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 7, 2006 | Daniel Cariaga, Special to The Times
Because of his formidable presence in certain parts of the repertory -- Beethoven and Schubert come immediately to mind -- Richard Goode's versatility has sometimes been overlooked. Yet over the years this great American pianist has shown us the breadth of his interests most convincingly. Bach was the subject Wednesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall when Goode returned to Los Angeles to please, thrill and titillate a roomful of enthusiastic followers.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 5, 1987 | HERBERT GLASS
The Sequoia String Quartet & Friends season at the Japan America Theatre ended triumphantly-- and somewhat sadly--on Sunday afternoon. The triumph was one of performing style over musical content: a magnificent reading of Elgar's bloated A-minor Piano Quintet. It was hardly coincidental that the Sequoians' collaborator in Elgar was the most steadfast of its "friends," pianist Richard Goode, whose presence over the years has consistently brought out the best in the ensemble.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Though connoisseurs long ago discovered him, Richard Goode remains a decidedly unfamous pianist. Yet, as he proved again Monday night, the New York-born musician, known among his cult for a deep and wide repertory and for having recorded all 32 of Beethoven's piano sonatas, deserves a place among the elite.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 7, 1989 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Like mushrooms and true love, genuine Beethoven players spring up, unannounced, and in unlikely places. For instance: the last half-decade has produced an unpredicted Beethoven specialist in the person of the American musician Richard Goode, who until recently seemed to be merely an unprepossessing pianist of solid credentials but small charisma. Now, as demonstrated again in his first Ambassador Auditorium recital Tuesday night, the 46-year-old Goode casts a long shadow over the field.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Richard Goode was a dark horse for so many years, it's hard to believe the American pianist now occupies a place among the musical elite. Still, that place is secure, as Goode's latest Southland recital proved, again, Sunday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Experience has taught us that not all "experts" are true authorities; sometimes, reputations are created by hype and wishful thinking.
HEALTH
June 29, 1998 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Unbelievable. Little Richard was actually going to play the piano during our interview. We were talking in the hotel bar at the Hyatt West Hollywood when his fingers began playing air piano. He looked around for the piano. "It's gone for real?" Richard Wayne Penniman asked his brother Robert. "I was going to show you something," Little Richard told me. And I really wanted to hear it--all of it--I told the rock 'n' roll legend from Macon, Ga., who's 65. "Tutti-Frutti." "Good Golly, Miss Molly."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 1998 | TIMOTHY MANGAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
I bet Richard Goode doesn't play the Rachmaninoff Third Piano Concerto. He's not the type; his taste is too refined. It would be like asking Laurence Olivier to play Rambo. He probably doesn't play much Bartok or Prokofiev either. Those composers' use of the piano as a percussion instrument--hammers striking strings--goes against the grain of Goode's view. He sees the piano as essentially a singing instrument--hammers caressing strings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
A story is told about a prominent anarchist: Although he opposed laws of all kinds, his kids jumping on the bed drove him crazy, and he became, at home, a tyrant. Orpheus, that peculiar chamber orchestra of 36 players with no conductor--which is filling in this week at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for the Los Angeles Philharmonic on tour in Spain--brings to mind such anarchism. These are musicians who have rebelled, and rebelled successfully, against government.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 1997 | Ken Smith, Ken Smith is a freelance writer based in New York
It's Thursday afternoon and Richard Goode is seated at the piano in front of about 20 members of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. His hands move in an arc as he sings through the line they have just finished rehearsing from Mozart's C-major Piano Concerto, K. 503, suggesting a different tack. He holds back the flow almost imperceptibly, but when the full orchestra plays, the contrast is striking. Several Orpheans express their approval immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 1993 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Richard Goode was a dark horse for so many years, it's hard to believe the American pianist now occupies a place among the musical elite. Still, that place is secure, as Goode's latest Southland recital proved, again, Sunday night in the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion. Experience has taught us that not all "experts" are true authorities; sometimes, reputations are created by hype and wishful thinking.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 20, 1992 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Extraordinary pianism was the order of the weekend at Royce Hall on the UCLA campus. Friday night, Robert McDonald, assisting violinist Midori in a memorable recital (reviewed Monday), restored respect for the sometimes dimming occupation of "collaborative artist." And Sunday, in a joint appearance with soprano, Dawn Upshaw, Richard Goode proved again that a gang of equals beats any other musical combination.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1988 | TERRY McQUILKIN
The third concert in the "Music for Mischa" series was devoted to one composer, and featured only one other performer in addition to cellist and series producer Robert Martin, who performs on each of the four programs. Collaborating with his fellow Curtis Institute alumnus, pianist Richard Goode presented a rather serious Beethoven program Tuesday evening at Gindi Auditorium. Expansive and daunting for performer and listener, the "Hammerklavier" Sonata makes for a heady recital-opener.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 1997 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
A story is told about a prominent anarchist: Although he opposed laws of all kinds, his kids jumping on the bed drove him crazy, and he became, at home, a tyrant. Orpheus, that peculiar chamber orchestra of 36 players with no conductor--which is filling in this week at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion for the Los Angeles Philharmonic on tour in Spain--brings to mind such anarchism. These are musicians who have rebelled, and rebelled successfully, against government.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Though connoisseurs long ago discovered him, Richard Goode remains a decidedly unfamous pianist. Yet, as he proved again Monday night, the New York-born musician, known among his cult for a deep and wide repertory and for having recorded all 32 of Beethoven's piano sonatas, deserves a place among the elite.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1991 | DANIEL CARIAGA, TIMES MUSIC WRITER
Though connoisseurs long ago discovered him, Richard Goode remains a decidedly unfamous pianist. Yet, as he proved again Monday night, the New York-born musician, known among his cult for a deep and wide repertory and for having recorded all 32 of Beethoven's piano sonatas, deserves a place among the elite.
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