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Richard Goodwin

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NEWS
September 14, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Richard N. Goodwin has grown bored with the questions about why he wrote such mean things about Lyndon Baines Johnson. "I'm not saying anything mean about Johnson," Goodwin said in an interview in his living room here. His voice was less testy than resigned; this was not the first time he had been asked about his iconoclasm, and he was not the first person to write that Johnson was difficult or that he sometimes received guests while seated on the toilet.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Richard H. Goodwin, a pioneering land preservationist and early president of the Nature Conservancy who negotiated the conservation group's first land purchase in California, a 3,000-acre stretch of virgin forest along the state's northern coast, has died. He was 96. Goodwin, who was a longtime botany professor at Connecticut College, died July 6 in East Lyme, Conn., the college announced. No cause of death was given.
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BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Jim Miller, Miller is the author of "Democracy Is in the Streets: From Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago" (Simon & Schuster). and
Once a White House insider under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, later an influential outsider and critic of the war in Vietnam, Richard Goodwin has written a flawed but fascinating kind of political Bildungsroman .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"Writing a play is hard," Richard N. Goodwin reflects. "I found it the most difficult thing I'd ever undertaken. It's much easier to write a national speech for a U.S. president than to write a play." Goodwin is one of the few men in the world who could offer such an opinion based on personal experience. In the 1960s, he was a speechwriter for two Democratic presidents, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Now at age 71, he has finally made his debut as a dramatist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1989
In response to "Sold Off by a Greedy Few, to Our Vast Harm," by Richard Goodwin, Op-Ed Page, Sept. 29: Goodwin's only valid points are that American management is greedy and shortsighted. This has been the case since the end of World War II, made possible by the survival of the U.S. as the only major industrial power, with no competition in basic industries such as steel, automobiles, construction, etc. Without foreign competition, short-term profits and share-prices increasingly became the indexes of mangement performance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
Re "The Class Struggle Is Over--the Wealthy Win," Commentary, July 15: What planet does Richard Goodwin live on? In his diatribe he states that "the value of securities has increased by $2 trillion in the last year and a half. Almost none of that went to the politicians' much beloved middle class; none of it went to the poor." On the contrary, the middle class was the chief beneficiary of that increase in value. Goodwin conveniently ignores the fact those securities are mostly owned by pension funds and IRAs, the chief beneficiaries being members of the middle class and, to a lesser extent, the working poor whose employers help fund their stake in those pension plans.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1988 | SUE SUMMERS
To make a six-hour, two-movie version of Charles Dickens' least-known book is an act of cinematic bravery that some people would say verges on the eccentric. But director Christine Edzard and producer Richard Goodwin, the husband-and-wife team behind "Little Dorrit," have had their faith in the project rewarded. In Britain, the critics hailed it as the finest adaptation of a Dickens novel since David Lean's "Great Expectations" 40 years ago, and it ran for seven months in a top London cinema.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 2007 | Valerie J. Nelson, Times Staff Writer
Richard H. Goodwin, a pioneering land preservationist and early president of the Nature Conservancy who negotiated the conservation group's first land purchase in California, a 3,000-acre stretch of virgin forest along the state's northern coast, has died. He was 96. Goodwin, who was a longtime botany professor at Connecticut College, died July 6 in East Lyme, Conn., the college announced. No cause of death was given.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1993 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin was an assistant special counsel to President Kennedy and a special assistant to President Johnson. He now writes in Concord, Mass.
"To everything there is a season." And without fail there will be a season to make critical, even harsh judgments on the acts and policies of President William Jefferson Clinton. But not today. For in his inaugural, Clinton met the first test of his presidency with dignity and understanding. An inaugural address, like most political speeches, is not a literary composition but an event. It is not designed for inclusion in anthologies, but to accomplish a fairly immediate purpose.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard N. Goodwin's "The Hinge of the World" is a rare accomplishment, a book of ideas that manages to be animated, suspenseful and firmly grounded in the individual psychological identities of its principal characters. The ideas under discussion here--about scientific method and the threat it posed to Catholicism during the first decades of the 17th century--feel as fresh and as startling as when they were first formulated.
NEWS
August 7, 1998 | MICHAEL FRANK, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Richard N. Goodwin's "The Hinge of the World" is a rare accomplishment, a book of ideas that manages to be animated, suspenseful and firmly grounded in the individual psychological identities of its principal characters. The ideas under discussion here--about scientific method and the threat it posed to Catholicism during the first decades of the 17th century--feel as fresh and as startling as when they were first formulated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 24, 1996
Re "The Class Struggle Is Over--the Wealthy Win," Commentary, July 15: What planet does Richard Goodwin live on? In his diatribe he states that "the value of securities has increased by $2 trillion in the last year and a half. Almost none of that went to the politicians' much beloved middle class; none of it went to the poor." On the contrary, the middle class was the chief beneficiary of that increase in value. Goodwin conveniently ignores the fact those securities are mostly owned by pension funds and IRAs, the chief beneficiaries being members of the middle class and, to a lesser extent, the working poor whose employers help fund their stake in those pension plans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 1993 | RICHARD N. GOODWIN, Richard N. Goodwin was an assistant special counsel to President Kennedy and a special assistant to President Johnson. He now writes in Concord, Mass.
"To everything there is a season." And without fail there will be a season to make critical, even harsh judgments on the acts and policies of President William Jefferson Clinton. But not today. For in his inaugural, Clinton met the first test of his presidency with dignity and understanding. An inaugural address, like most political speeches, is not a literary composition but an event. It is not designed for inclusion in anthologies, but to accomplish a fairly immediate purpose.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1989
In response to "Sold Off by a Greedy Few, to Our Vast Harm," by Richard Goodwin, Op-Ed Page, Sept. 29: Goodwin's only valid points are that American management is greedy and shortsighted. This has been the case since the end of World War II, made possible by the survival of the U.S. as the only major industrial power, with no competition in basic industries such as steel, automobiles, construction, etc. Without foreign competition, short-term profits and share-prices increasingly became the indexes of mangement performance.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 13, 1988 | SUE SUMMERS
To make a six-hour, two-movie version of Charles Dickens' least-known book is an act of cinematic bravery that some people would say verges on the eccentric. But director Christine Edzard and producer Richard Goodwin, the husband-and-wife team behind "Little Dorrit," have had their faith in the project rewarded. In Britain, the critics hailed it as the finest adaptation of a Dickens novel since David Lean's "Great Expectations" 40 years ago, and it ran for seven months in a top London cinema.
BOOKS
September 25, 1988 | Jim Miller, Miller is the author of "Democracy Is in the Streets: From Port Huron to the Siege of Chicago" (Simon & Schuster). and
Once a White House insider under Presidents John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson, later an influential outsider and critic of the war in Vietnam, Richard Goodwin has written a flawed but fascinating kind of political Bildungsroman .
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2003 | David Gritten, Special to The Times
"Writing a play is hard," Richard N. Goodwin reflects. "I found it the most difficult thing I'd ever undertaken. It's much easier to write a national speech for a U.S. president than to write a play." Goodwin is one of the few men in the world who could offer such an opinion based on personal experience. In the 1960s, he was a speechwriter for two Democratic presidents, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson. Now at age 71, he has finally made his debut as a dramatist.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1990
Richard Goodwin's column "The Shirking Cowards of Capitol Hill" (Column Left, Commentary, Dec. 5) is right on! He chastises Congress for not doing its constitutional duty in making the decision about war. This is the most important point of the entire Iraq-Kuwait affair. His article should be required reading for every voter. TOM KILLGROVE, Frazier Park
NEWS
September 14, 1988 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, Times Staff Writer
Richard N. Goodwin has grown bored with the questions about why he wrote such mean things about Lyndon Baines Johnson. "I'm not saying anything mean about Johnson," Goodwin said in an interview in his living room here. His voice was less testy than resigned; this was not the first time he had been asked about his iconoclasm, and he was not the first person to write that Johnson was difficult or that he sometimes received guests while seated on the toilet.
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