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Richard Grayson

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
At Occidental College, where he has taught for nearly 20 years, Richard Grayson is a mild-mannered professor of music who usually keeps to himself, teaches his courses, interacts with his students and sometimes practices the piano late into the night. He spends a lot of time in his quiet, orderly and soundproof office in the music building at the north end of the hillside campus in Eagle Rock. Except once a year, when this Clark Kent of a pianist turns into Superimprovisor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1988 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
At Occidental College, where he has taught for nearly 20 years, Richard Grayson is a mild-mannered professor of music who usually keeps to himself, teaches his courses, interacts with his students and sometimes practices the piano late into the night. He spends a lot of time in his quiet, orderly and soundproof office in the music building at the north end of the hillside campus in Eagle Rock. Except once a year, when this Clark Kent of a pianist turns into Superimprovisor.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1987 | TERRY McQUILKIN
To help celebrate the centennial at Occidental College, four illustrious alumni were invited to perform Saturday evening, along with the College Chorus, Glee Club and Orchestra, at Thorne Hall. In addition, the school commissioned faculty member Richard Grayson to write a new work for the occasion. Based on five very different poems by Robinson Jeffers (also an Occidental alumnus), "Continent's End" looks at humanity with brooding pessimism.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1992 | RICHARD S. GINELL
A program entitled "New Year, New World" would seem to promise a barrage of festive, exuberant sounds, wouldn't it? Yet Edward Cansino, the compulsively adventurous director of I Cantori, proved otherwise at Occidental College's Thorne Hall on Saturday night. Whether Cansino meant it or not, one could interpret I Cantori's commemoration of the Columbus year as a now-fashionably thoughtful meditation on the mixed effects that Columbus' visit had on this hemisphere.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | ANN KLARNER
Something seems wrong here. The music sounds Baroque, all right, but the melody is more like what you heard last week wailing out of some kid's boombox. Has Hammer gone Bach in time? Actually, no. It's Richard Grayson's 23rd annual Classical Keyboard Improvisation and Live Electronic Music Concert on Friday night at Occidental College. "Most improvisation is nowadays jazz or pop music," said Grayson, who is chairman of the music department at Occidental.
NEWS
May 25, 1995 | ALAN C. MILLER and ELIZABETH SHOGREN
TIMELY GETAWAY: The American Bankers Assn. couldn't have asked for better timing for the annual retreat it hosts for congressional staffers. Two days before the House Banking Committee took up major banking legislation earlier this month, 15 to 20 congressional staffers--primarily from the House and Senate banking panels--gathered at the association's expense at The Homestead, a posh resort in Hot Springs, Va.
NEWS
May 20, 1989 | GREGG WAGER
After 20 fruitful years filled with grading papers, giving lectures and all the chores associated with being a college professor, Richard Grayson is reaching for new directions. He now sees himself performing more and touring around the country. "I admit I've always been a shy person," said the 48-year-old composer-pianist and master improvisationist from his Santa Monica home where he lives with his wife and two cats. "But now I have a manager to take care of all the little things that were never done before and think I might be ready to take my act on the road."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1985 | MARC SHULGOLD
There's a scene in "Amadeus" that is as revealing about musical gamesmanship of that era as it is about its two protagonists. Salieri had just composed a homely little march in honor of young Mozart's arrival in court. Modestly, the precocious composer sits at the keyboard, repeats Salieri's march verbatim, then merrily dissects it, expands it and, to the amazement of all, winds up with a whole new tune--later to turn up in "Le Nozze di Figaro."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
UC Irvine composer Paul Hodgins wants to convince people that electronic music is not just "squeaks, rattles and things that go bump in the night." "That was the nature of the music at the beginning," agreed Hodgins, 29, chairman of the new Gassman Electronic Studio at UC Irvine. "Until the advent of digital technology, (electronic music) was really primitive music making." But advances in technology over the past 10 years have changed all that.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 2001 | JON MATSUMOTO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Simple arts and crafts activities, face painting and clown appearances have become standard activities for children at many family-oriented festivals and events. Ho-hum. Parents and their kids get much more than that when they take part in Family Sundays at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art. Held each Sunday between 12:30 and 3:15 p.m., the program involves five workshops and a docent-led gallery tour designed for families.
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