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Richard Greenberg

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Greenberg once savored the idea of being little known, satisfied that the obscure life of a working playwright was more than enough to make him happy. He even went out of his way to deflate his sudden national prominence a decade ago at 30--"That oppressive cultural instant," he called it--as the witty author of "Eastern Standard," a satirical comedy hailed by the New York Times for its dazzling summation of the post-crash '80s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
NEW YORK - "I'm too tired to be anxious," said playwright Richard Greenberg, looking worn out with anxiety as he settled into a booth at a Chelsea diner. This neighborhood canteen, dubbed his "office" by the late theatrical agent Helen Merrill, is where he conducts "business," broadly defined as any professional obligation requiring him to leave his nearby apartment and temporarily abandon his real work, the writing of deliciously urbane, hyper-articulate plays. If Greenberg seems a little strung-out these days, it's with good reason.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1997 | Jan Breslauer, Jan Breslauer is a regular contributor to Calendar
Richard Greenberg, one of the most produced young American dramatists to emerge in the past decade, is in an unusually comfortable situation. He's got not just one but two new works about to premiere, both at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. The two works are very different: The first, opening Thursday, is his adaptation of Marivaux's 18th century comedy "The Triumph of Love," based on a new literal translation by John Glore and directed by Mark Rucker.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2009 | David Ng
The actress Jenny O'Hara may not be familiar to most readers, but anyone remotely connected to the Los Angeles theater world in the last 35 years will have crossed her path or seen her perform. Her career longevity -- mostly on stage and television -- offers proof of a reputation built on talent, patience and years of unglamorous ensemble work.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the extent that he savors his relative obscurity and goes out of his way to deflate the aura of success surrounding "Eastern Standard," his best-known play, by describing it as "that oppressive cultural instant," Richard Greenberg is a publicist's nightmare. "There's this myth that gets put out in the publicity that I had this wonderful Broadway hit," he says. "It's in all of the brochures here. (But) 'Eastern Standard' was a bomb. It ran for three months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1994
Isn't it funny that the people criticizing Clinton for mentioning his underwear are the same ones who busy themselves airing his dirty laundry. RICHARD GREENBERG Pacific Palisades
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Sherry Stern
Richard Greenberg, who has written eight plays for Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory Theatre, including his Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Days of Rain," will continue the relationship next year with the world premiere of "Our Mother's Brief Affair." The SCR faithful will remember a laugh-so-hard-you-cry reading of the play at the theater's 2007 Pacific Playwrights Festival, starring Jill Clayburgh and Adam Arkin doing their best Jewish mother and son. So it's fitting that the play will premiere at the 12th annual festival, with a run April 3 to May 3 on the Segerstrom Stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa scored big in the 1998 Pulitzer Prizes, despite not coming up with a winner. Two plays commissioned by Orange County's professional resident theater company and produced there last season--Amy Freed's "Freedomland" and Richard Greenberg's "Three Days of Rain"--were named as two of the three finalists for the Pulitzer in drama. "It's as close as you can get without having to buy new clothes," Greenberg, 39, said Wednesday from his Manhattan home.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The third annual Pacific Playwrights Festival at South Coast Repertory will introduce nine new works and again give theatergoers a window on something the Costa Mesa theater is acclaimed for: developing new plays and cultivating emerging playwrights. The festival, from June 15-25, will consist of fully staged productions of two plays and staged readings, without scenery and costumes, of seven others. Festival-goers will get a taste of SCR's coming season.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 26, 1991 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Playwright Richard Greenberg savors his relative obscurity and goes out of his way to deflate the aura of success surrounding "Eastern Standard," his best-known work, by describing it as "that oppressive cultural instant." "There's this myth that I had this wonderful Broadway hit," he says. "It's in all of the brochures here. (But) 'Eastern Standard' ran for three months. There were times when you could have catered a reception in the balcony. It lost money."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2008 | Sherry Stern
Richard Greenberg, who has written eight plays for Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory Theatre, including his Pulitzer Prize-winning "Three Days of Rain," will continue the relationship next year with the world premiere of "Our Mother's Brief Affair." The SCR faithful will remember a laugh-so-hard-you-cry reading of the play at the theater's 2007 Pacific Playwrights Festival, starring Jill Clayburgh and Adam Arkin doing their best Jewish mother and son. So it's fitting that the play will premiere at the 12th annual festival, with a run April 3 to May 3 on the Segerstrom Stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2008 | Charles McNulty, Times Theater Critic
Money may be a principal motive for the characters in Richard Greenberg's "The Injured Party," but whether they're already wealthy or hoping to be soon, all are richly endowed with the author's enviable bankroll of language. In this curiously digressive play, which had its world premiere Friday at South Coast Repertory, cascades of golden words pour from the mouths of archly sophisticated New Yorkers, who even kvetch with a poet's precision. It's a reminder that Greenberg is one of the few living American playwrights (along with Edward Albee and David Mamet)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | Richard Greenberg, Special to The Times
One year when I was feeling competitive, my agent went to a preview of what I thought would be a major rival. He called from the car. "It's a sad little play," he declared. And many agreed, and I lived happily ever after. But his description -- dismissal -- stuck with me. There are worse things you can call a play than "a sad little play." "A bad little play" is worse, I think. So is "big piece of crap."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | By Richard Greenberg, Special to The Times
ONE year when I was feeling competitive, my agent went to a preview of what I thought would be a major rival. He called from the car. "It's a sad little play," he declared. And many agreed, and I lived happily ever after. But his description -- dismissal -- stuck with me. There are worse things you can call a play than "a sad little play. " "A bad little play" is worse, I think. So is "big piece of crap. " Yet there's something in that summary so dispirited, so enervated, so devoid of elation, that it seems to me that any play that can answer to it violates the purpose of theater more thoroughly than gaudily inept stuff, which might, at least, have some energy (in fact, big pieces of crap have provided me with some of my most cherished theatergoing memories)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One night in 1996, playwright Richard Greenberg made his way uptown from his lower Manhattan apartment to a production of "Holiday," Philip Barry's 1928-vintage play about a self-made man who woos two daughters from an upper-crust family. He had no desire to revisit a show he remembered as nothing more than "bright chat," but he went out of a "friendship duty" to the director, David Warren. Expecting shallowness, Greenberg came away startled by the play's poignancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 27, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, Mike Boehm is a Times staff writer
Playwright Richard Greenberg was strolling near South Coast Repertory, his artistic home away from home, when a voice stopped him from behind. "Do you really hate us, Mr. Greenberg?" The amiable, round, gentle-natured Manhattanite turned to face a friendly but slightly peeved couple from Orange County. He didn't need to ask what they meant.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 2002 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One night in 1996, playwright Richard Greenberg made his way uptown from his lower Manhattan apartment to a production of "Holiday," Philip Barry's 1928-vintage play about a self-made man who woos two daughters from an upper-crust family. He had no desire to revisit a show he remembered as nothing more than "bright chat," but he went out of a "friendship duty" to the director, David Warren. Expecting shallowness, Greenberg came away startled by the play's poignancy.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | By Richard Greenberg, Special to The Times
ONE year when I was feeling competitive, my agent went to a preview of what I thought would be a major rival. He called from the car. "It's a sad little play," he declared. And many agreed, and I lived happily ever after. But his description -- dismissal -- stuck with me. There are worse things you can call a play than "a sad little play. " "A bad little play" is worse, I think. So is "big piece of crap. " Yet there's something in that summary so dispirited, so enervated, so devoid of elation, that it seems to me that any play that can answer to it violates the purpose of theater more thoroughly than gaudily inept stuff, which might, at least, have some energy (in fact, big pieces of crap have provided me with some of my most cherished theatergoing memories)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2000 | MIKE BOEHM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The third annual Pacific Playwrights Festival at South Coast Repertory will introduce nine new works and again give theatergoers a window on something the Costa Mesa theater is acclaimed for: developing new plays and cultivating emerging playwrights. The festival, from June 15-25, will consist of fully staged productions of two plays and staged readings, without scenery and costumes, of seven others. Festival-goers will get a taste of SCR's coming season.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1998 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Richard Greenberg once savored the idea of being little known, satisfied that the obscure life of a working playwright was more than enough to make him happy. He even went out of his way to deflate his sudden national prominence a decade ago at 30--"That oppressive cultural instant," he called it--as the witty author of "Eastern Standard," a satirical comedy hailed by the New York Times for its dazzling summation of the post-crash '80s.
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