Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsRichard Gregorie
IN THE NEWS

Richard Gregorie

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
October 6, 1991 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley has written extensively about Latin America. He interviewed Richard D. Gregorie from his Miami office
The trial of Manual A. Noriega began as a gleam in the eye of Richard D. Gregorie. The top narcotics prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Miami in the mid-1980s, Gregorie wrote the indictment that eventually landed Noriega in a Miami courtroom. It was a natural move for Gregorie. Born in Boston, his personal style is brash and streetwise; his entire professional career has been devoted to cracking major criminal conspiracies.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
October 6, 1991 | Jefferson Morley, Jefferson Morley has written extensively about Latin America. He interviewed Richard D. Gregorie from his Miami office
The trial of Manual A. Noriega began as a gleam in the eye of Richard D. Gregorie. The top narcotics prosecutor in the U.S. Attorney's Office in Miami in the mid-1980s, Gregorie wrote the indictment that eventually landed Noriega in a Miami courtroom. It was a natural move for Gregorie. Born in Boston, his personal style is brash and streetwise; his entire professional career has been devoted to cracking major criminal conspiracies.
Advertisement
NEWS
November 24, 1988 | Associated Press
The prosecutor who won drug-trafficking indictments against Panamanian Gen. Manuel A. Noriega and top leaders of the Medellin, Colombia, cartel resigned Wednesday from the U.S. attorney's office. Richard Gregorie, 41, chief assistant to U.S. Atty. Dexter Lehtinen, said he will join a private law firm that specializes in civil cases.
NEWS
July 22, 1988
Bolivian police seized Roberto Suarez Gomez, considered one of the top cocaine traffickers in South America. Suarez, 56, is wanted in the United States on drug trafficking charges and has been called by authorities the godfather of Bolivia's illegal cocaine trade and a major supplier of drugs to the Medellin, Colombia, drug cartel. Upon hearing news of the capture, Miami's Chief Assistant U.S. Atty. Richard Gregorie said, "He's the biggest cocaine producer in the world."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1988 | Associated Press
A millionaire businessman who promised to bankroll a new life for a welfare mother of five faces criminal charges and a $1.4-million judgment in a bank fraud and is not free to spend his money, attorneys said Thursday. James Gisclair had offered to buy a house for Anita Hunter and her family and provide her with a job, a college education, a car and a nurse to care for the children.
NEWS
March 7, 2000 | Associated Press
A U.S. immigration official accused of spying for the Cuban government pleaded not guilty Monday to federal charges of communicating national defense secrets. Mariano Faget, 54, a Cuban-born supervisor in the Miami office of the Immigration and Naturalization Service, stood silently during the brief arraignment hearing. "He is adamant that he is not guilty of these charges," said lawyer Diane Ward, standing in for Faget's lawyer. "He is adamant that he did not do anything to betray his country."
NEWS
September 15, 1988 | United Press International
Lawyers for Gen. Manuel A. Noriega filed a sealed motion today to dismiss drug charges against the Panamanian strongman. They denied prosecution charges that Noriega might be filing the document to "cut himself a deal" in a U.S. presidential election year. "I am not engaging in any kind of political chicanery," said Noriega lawyer Neal Sonnett of Miami. "We have important legal issues. Those are the only things we're arguing. There is no political purpose to this motion at all."
NEWS
September 16, 1988 | United Press International
Lawyers for Gen. Manuel A. Noriega filed a sealed motion Thursday to dismiss drug charges against the Panamanian strongman, but they denied prosecutors' suggestions that Noriega is seeking to "cut himself a deal" in a U.S. presidential election year. "I am not engaging in any kind of political chicanery," said Noriega's American lawyer, Neal Sonnett. "We have important legal issues. Those are the only things we're arguing. There is no political purpose to this motion at all."
NEWS
July 2, 1997 | ROBERT L. JACKSON and MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal authorities who arrested two Lithuanians for allegedly trying to sell tactical nuclear weapons from the former Soviet Union acknowledged Tuesday that they have no proof the pair actually could have delivered nuclear devices.
NEWS
May 31, 2000 | MIKE CLARY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A former career U.S. immigration officer was convicted of four counts of espionage Tuesday in a case that was less about spying for Fidel Castro's Cuba than it was about cashing in once the Communist ruler is gone. Mariano Faget, 54, a supervisor in the Miami office of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service, was found guilty of violating the Espionage Act by disclosing official secrets and lying about his contacts with Cuban diplomats.
NATIONAL
April 24, 2008 | Vanessa Blum, South Florida Sun-Sentinel
Federal prosecutors announced plans Wednesday to retry six Florida men on terrorism charges despite two consecutive mistrials in a case once trumpeted as a success in the government's war on terrorism. "We've worked very hard this past week, reviewing everything in this case and considering it very, very seriously," prosecutor Richard Gregorie said in Miami federal court. "The United States has decided it's necessary to proceed . . . one more time." The defendants have been detained since their arrests in June 2006.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|